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Stovall Mill Covered Bridge located in Sautee Nacoochee, GA dates to the 1890s

Stovall Mill Covered Bridge and historic marker
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge

Located off of Georgia Highway 255 in Sautee Nacoochee, GA is the 38-foot-long Stovall Mill Covered Bridge. The graffiti covered bridge dates to before the turn of the 20th century. As would be expected, parking is free and there is no admission charge to view or walk across the bridge. Picnic tables are on site so you can enjoy the views and sounds of Chickamauga Creek.

Text for the Georgia Historic Marker reads:

Stovall Mill Covered Bridge

Fred Dover constructed a bridge and nearby grist, saw and shingle mill complex here in the late 1800s. The original bridge washed away in the early 1890s and Will Pardue replaced it in 1895 with the present 38-foot structure. Dover sold the operation to Fred Stovall, Sr. in 1917. The mill and dam washed away in 1964. Constructed as a modification of the queen post truss design, the bridge’s trusses have two vertical posts (with iron rods) separated by a horizontal crosspiece. The bridge was featured in the movie I’d Climb the Highest Mountain  starring Susan Heyward.

Erected by the Georgia Historical Society, Georgia Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration.

Stovall Mill Covered Bridge historic marker
Georgia Historic Marker recognizing the Stovall Mill Covered Bridge. The marker dates from 2000.
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge and historic marker
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge and Georgia Historic Marker
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

For those with more interest in the subject, I recommend the book Vanishing Landmarks of Georgia: Grist Mills and Covered Bridges written by Joseph Kovarik. Vanishing Landmarks of Georgia spotlights 56 remaining gristmills and 16 covered bridges. In addition to stunning color photographs of each structure, the guide provides a history of the site and detailed directions, including maps and GPS coordinates.

 

 

 

I’d Climb the Highest Mountain, starring Susan Hayward and William Lundigan is available on DVD. This simple story directed by Henry King, follows a Methodist minister called to a rural Georgia mountain community. There he and his city-bred wife use their love to help a small town find God. The film has limited reviews on Rotten Tomatoes.

 

 

 

 


Covered Bridges of the Northeast
 

In Covered Bridges of the Northeast, author Richard Sanders  Allen describes foot bridges, latticework, and double-decked structures, double-barreled bridges, drawbridges, and more, in locations from Maine to New Jersey. Enhanced with 150 illustrations, diagrams, and maps, the text provides complete information on bridge location, length of span, and other data. A priceless tribute to bygone days, this profusely illustrated and delightfully written book will captivate lovers of Americana and anyone interested in bridge construction.

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Historic Lake Monroe Bridge in Sanford, Florida

Marker with the bridge in background
Lake Monroe Historic Marker
The front side of the Lake Monroe Historic Marker
Lake Monroe Bridge marker
The backside of the Lake Monroe historic marker
Marker with the bridge in background
The old Lake Monroe Bridge with the historic marker showing in front.

 

Marker Text

The Lake Monroe Bridge was the first electronically operated swing bridge in Florida. In 1932-1933, the
state used Federal assistance to build the bridge, which replaced a wooden toll bridge that was manually
operated. The construction of the bridge provided economic relief for an area hurt by the economic
collapse of the Depression era. The bridge was fabricated by Ingalls Iron Works of Birmingham, Alabama;
the swing machinery manufactured by Earl’s Gears and Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and it
was erected by W. W. White Steel Construction of St. Petersburg, Florida. Kreis Contracting Company of
Knoxville, Tennessee was the general contractor for the Florida Department of Transportation. The
Florida Department of Transportation and Seminole County cooperated in preserving the swing span as
a fishing pier when the new Benedict Bridge was completed in 1994.

The Lake Monroe Bridge had historic impact on the communities of the area, but also is of historical
value as an example of a branch of bridge engineering.

The Lake Monroe Bridge was 627 feet, and included a 235 foot swing span. It carried the main route
linking Daytona Beach and Tampa, via DeLand, Sanford, Orlando, and Lakeland. It could pivot 360
degrees on its curved rack and two spur pinions.

The Warren-type through truss construction had a central panel section peaked to accommodate the
drive machinery. The Warren-type truss is considered the most economical type of construction for
continuous spans. It is characterized by diagonals that alternate in direction. The first diagonal beam
starts at base level and goes up to the top. The next level diagonal starts at the top and goes down to
the base level. The diagonals are in tension and compression in alternate panels. To meet the heavy
stresses of the swing span operation the bridge arms were heavily reinforced and had riveted
connections at all stress points. The harbor for Lake Monroe Park in Volusia County was created by fill
taken from the approaches to the Lake Monroe Bridge.

Seminole County Board of County Commissioners

This marker is not part of the State of Florida historic marker program.

Lake Monroe Bridge dedication April 6, 1934
The April 6, 1934 Lake Monroe Bridge dedication. Image courtesy Florida Memory n028431

 

Local newspaper reports state that dedication of the $75,000 Bridge took place at a 3 p.m. ceremony on
April 6, 1934. Participants included Florida Governor David Sholtz and the Stetson University band. An image of the dedication is shown above.

See some beautiful early images of Sanford, FL in this title from the Images of America Series. From its days as a leading river town, to being the Celery Capital, to being the home to many incredible mid-century modern homes, Sanford has an incredible history.

Also recommended is African Americans of Sanford, which recognizes and applauds those who have helped to preserve Sanford’s history as well as those who have participated in making it.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors  products.