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In Memory: Officer Thomas M. Coulter of the Daytona Beach Police Department

Thomas Coulter headstone Courtesy Findagrave

Thomas M. Coulter

Thomas M. Coulter Courtesy Findagrave
Thomas M. Coulter
Courtesy Findagrave

Having only graduated from the police academy at Daytona State College in 2017, Thomas M. Coulter was beginning to live out his dream of being a police officer when hired by the Daytona Beach Police Department in 2018.

Thomas M. Coulter was born January 29, 1993 in New Jersey to parents Ann and Michael Coulter. He later earned his high school diploma and A.A. degree in 2011, finishing early with the assistance of dual enrollment credits. He was to later attend the University of Central Florida.

Coulter began his recruit training on May 14, 2018 after passing a preemployment physical with the Daytona Beach Police Department. On the morning of Friday, May 18, Coulter, along with twenty-three other recruits and three trainers, were participating in what police chief Craig Capri said was a team building exercise. This was was jogging and walking exercise that included stops for pushups and stretching. The group was moving at the speed of the slowest participant.

Around 8:00 a.m. Coulter collapsed during training. He was taken to Halifax Health Medical Center where doctors initially believed he would recover. His condition began to decline on Saturday the 19th and he passed away at 4:30 a.m. on Monday, May 21. Autopsy reports would later show the Coulter died of a heart attack.

Fellow recruits were allowed that Monday off training but were required to return on Tuesday morning. DBPD provided counseling for those in need.

According to Chief Capri, Coulter had made no complaint of discomfort or feeling ill before collapsing and as noted prior, had passed the required physical. Capri stated that Coulter was in “average shape” for a 25 year old.

Chief Capri was quoted in the local newspaper, “This young man, all he wanted to do was be a police officer. Talking with the family he wanted to be a police officer. That was his life’s dream, since he was a little kid. That was his goal and he did meet his goal.”

His memorial service was held at the News-Journal Center in downtown Daytona Beach. The service was attended by law enforcement officers from numerous agencies and then Florida governor Rick Scott. Capri stated, “I’m just very proud of the community, the support of the community. And we had police officers from all over.”

Thomas Coulter left behind a wife of only six months, Jazmin, his parents, a brother, Mikey, and sisters Sandy and Bridgette, along with extended family members.

Thomas Coulter headstoneCourtesy Findagrave
Thomas M. Coulter headstone
Courtesy Findagrave

Officer Coulter is buried at Daytona Memorial Pak in the Hero’s Garden of Glory section. His marker includes the words, Have a Great Day Officer Coulter. 

Officer Coulter is memorialized on the Law Enforcement Memorial Volusia and Flagler Counties located adjacent to the Historic Courthouse in DeLand, FL.

An online memorial for Officer Coulter may be found HERE.

 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.


All Gave Some Law Enforcement Mens T-Shirt

from: Flagshirt

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Stovall Mill Covered Bridge located in Sautee Nacoochee, GA dates to the 1890s

Stovall Mill Covered Bridge and historic marker
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge

Located off of Georgia Highway 255 in Sautee Nacoochee, GA is the 38-foot-long Stovall Mill Covered Bridge. The graffiti covered bridge dates to before the turn of the 20th century. As would be expected, parking is free and there is no admission charge to view or walk across the bridge. Picnic tables are on site so you can enjoy the views and sounds of Chickamauga Creek.

Text for the Georgia Historic Marker reads:

Stovall Mill Covered Bridge

Fred Dover constructed a bridge and nearby grist, saw and shingle mill complex here in the late 1800s. The original bridge washed away in the early 1890s and Will Pardue replaced it in 1895 with the present 38-foot structure. Dover sold the operation to Fred Stovall, Sr. in 1917. The mill and dam washed away in 1964. Constructed as a modification of the queen post truss design, the bridge’s trusses have two vertical posts (with iron rods) separated by a horizontal crosspiece. The bridge was featured in the movie I’d Climb the Highest Mountain  starring Susan Heyward.

Erected by the Georgia Historical Society, Georgia Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration.

Stovall Mill Covered Bridge historic marker
Georgia Historic Marker recognizing the Stovall Mill Covered Bridge. The marker dates from 2000.
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge and historic marker
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge and Georgia Historic Marker
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge
Stovall Mill Covered Bridge

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

For those with more interest in the subject, I recommend the book Vanishing Landmarks of Georgia: Grist Mills and Covered Bridges written by Joseph Kovarik. Vanishing Landmarks of Georgia spotlights 56 remaining gristmills and 16 covered bridges. In addition to stunning color photographs of each structure, the guide provides a history of the site and detailed directions, including maps and GPS coordinates.

 

 

 

I’d Climb the Highest Mountain, starring Susan Hayward and William Lundigan is available on DVD. This simple story directed by Henry King, follows a Methodist minister called to a rural Georgia mountain community. There he and his city-bred wife use their love to help a small town find God. The film has limited reviews on Rotten Tomatoes.

 

 

 

 


Covered Bridges of the Northeast
 

In Covered Bridges of the Northeast, author Richard Sanders  Allen describes foot bridges, latticework, and double-decked structures, double-barreled bridges, drawbridges, and more, in locations from Maine to New Jersey. Enhanced with 150 illustrations, diagrams, and maps, the text provides complete information on bridge location, length of span, and other data. A priceless tribute to bygone days, this profusely illustrated and delightfully written book will captivate lovers of Americana and anyone interested in bridge construction.

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Book Review: Shiloh National Military Park (Images of America)

Shiloh National Military Park book cover

McCutchen, Brian K., and Timothy B. Smith. Shiloh National Military Park (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing. 2012. ISBN 9780738591353. B/W photos. 127 pages. $21.99.

When armies under the commands of Ulysses S. Grant and Albert Sidney Johnston faced off on April 6 and 7, 1862, they could not have realized the carnage that would be left on the Tennessee battlefield. The Battle of Shiloh left almost 24,000 soldiers dead, wounded, missing, or captured, a staggering sum that included Confederate General Johnston.

In 1866, Pittsburg National Cemetery was established by the War Department; a name later changed to Shiloh National Cemetery in 1889.

Established on December 27, 1894, Shiloh National Military Park now serves as a reminder of those terrible two days of fighting that helped set in motion the events of the next three years. The park first operated under the guidance of the War Department but was moved to the National Park Service in 1933.

This 1894 legislation allowed for participating states to place monuments and memorials on the park grounds. The park as we know it today was beginning to take shape.

The Images of America series of books does an excellent job of providing access to usually older photos that the general public may not otherwise have the opportunity to view. In Shiloh National Military Park, authors Brian K. McCutchen and Timothy B. Smith achieve this standard, using images from the park collection.

McCutchen is a former park ranger at Shiloh and has served at other national parks. Timothy B. Smith is a professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Martin. He is a leading scholar on the Battle of Shiloh and has authored what many consider the definitive volume on the battle, Shiloh: Conquer or Perish.

In this Images of America title, the authors showcase just over 200 images, broken into seven chapters. As might be expected in a collection spanning longer than 150 years, some images have reproduced much better than others. Occasionally there are images that seem a bit fuzzy and hazy. This is not a major distraction however. Each image contains a caption with most being around fifty words. The captions are easy to read and bring additional life to the images. 

I particularly enjoyed the chapter titled, “Memories in Stone and Bronze: Monuments of Shiloh.” This chapter highlights just a few of the more than 150 monuments that are located throughout the 4,000+ acres of the park. As McCutchen and Smith state, “To the veterans of America’s first monster battle…the statuary was much more. It embodied full representations of the brave solders of North and South and thus told the stories that they wished to convey to future generations.: (p.57)

A little-known aspect of the battlefield that the authors cover is the cyclone of October 14, 1909. This storm, that appears to have been building throughout the day, killed seven and injured thirty-three. Damage to the park and cemetery were considerable with Congress ultimately allocating $8,000 for the national cemetery and almost $20,000 for repairs and reconstruction at the park. In just over a dozen photos, the damage to the park is shown, with trees uprooted, buildings destroyed, and monuments smashed.

The beauty of a book such as this is its simplicity. A reader can know nothing of the battle and still enjoy the rich history on the pages, the book serving as a potential gateway to further study. For those knowledgeable on the battle and the terrain of the battlefield there is still plenty to learn here. Chances are good that many of the images will be new, even to seasoned students of the battle.

This is not a new release, and the reality is, an expert such as Smith could probably release several similar volumes. Recommended for anybody studying the battle or planning to visit the Shiloh National Military Park.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.


Civil War Monitor

from: College Subscription Services LLC

Civil War Monitor is one of the leading magazines covering the war from all perspectives. With some of the best practicing historians regularly contributing articles, this is a must read for any student of the war. Click the link above of the photo to the left for exclusive subscription pricing!

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“Blind Willie” McTell and the 12-String Strut in Thomson Georgia

12-String Strut art exhibit in Thomson, GA.

Blind Willie McTell

Blind Willie McTell Image courtesy Library of Congress
Blind Willie McTell
Image courtesy Library of Congress

William Samuel McTier (McTear) was born in Thomson, Georgia on May 5, 1898, though some researchers contend that he was born in 1903, and his headstone gives the year of 1901. I have yet to find a source on how he became known as McTell. It is also unclear if young Willie was born blind or lost his sight during childhood. The New Georgia Encyclopedia indicates McTell attended schools for the blind in Georgia, New York, and Michigan.

While in his teens, McTell and his mother moved to Statesboro, GA, and it was here where Willie learned to play the six-string guitar.

By the 1920s, McTell had left the family home, taking to the road as a traveling musician, playing carnivals, bars, parties, churches, and street corners to earn a living.

Young and talented, McTell became popular in Atlanta, regularly playing at house parties and similar events. By this time, he had upped his game to the twelve-string guitar, an instrument that helped him project his music better in the crowded areas he often played.

By 1927, recording companies had noticed McTell and other blues musicians and he cut his first tracks for Victor Records, following that with a 1928 session for Columbia. The New Georgia Encyclopedia lists multiple studios that McTell recorded for, often under different names. Musicians of the era would often record under similar, but different, names in order to avoid contract conflicts. 

McTell was wed to Ruth Kate Williams in 1934. They were to later record several tracks together.

John A. Lomax recorded McTell as a part of the Archive of American Folk Song in 1940. These recordings, held by the Library of Congress, have been released under the title The Complete Library of Congress Recordings.

Commercially, McTells sales were declining during the 40s, and he found himself playing more on the streets. He did record for Atlantic Records in 1949 and Regal Records the same year. His final known recordings were made in 1956 by Atlanta record store owner Edward Rhodes.

Starting in 1957, McTell served as the preacher at Mount Zion Baptist Church in Atlanta and devoted himself to religious music. Blind Willie was to only live a short time longer and passed away on August 19, 1959, due to a cerebral hemorrhage. McTell is buried in Jones Grove Baptist Church Cemetery in Thomson, Georgia.

McTell’s 12-String Strut

Located in the downtown Thomson, GA area is a public art exhibit titled McTell’s 12-String Strut, honoring the locally born Blind Willie McTell. There are twelve, seven-foot-tall Stella guitars in the installation, each painted by a different artist. The guitar models were created by Icon Poly Studio and are made of polyurethane.

The installation was presented to the public in 2016 after a Georgia Department of Economic Development report suggested a public art component and providing additional exposure for one of McDuffie Counties most recognized citizens as part of the county’s tourism marketing efforts. 

Below, find images of 6 of the 12 guitars that are located throughout Thomson. 11 of these are very easy to find. The 12th however took a bit more digging. It is located outside the McDuffie County Government complex.

12-String Strut
12-String Strut

 

12-String Strut
12-String Strut
12-String Strut
12-String Strut

Posthumous Recognition

The Blues Hall of Fame inducted Blind Willie in 1981 and in 1990, the Georgia Music Hall of Fame bestowed the same honor.

Blind Willie McTell Georgia Historic Marker in Thomson, Georgia
Georgia Historic Marker in honor of Blind Willie McTell, located in Thomson, GA

In 1993, a Georgia Historic Marker was unveiled in Thomson, GA,, near the old railroad station, honoring McTell and his legacy. The text (including a few small grammatical errors) reads as follows

Willie Samuel McTear (1901-1959) was born between Big and Little Briar Creeks in the Happy Valley Community. In 1911, he and his mother moved to Statesboro, where he began his life of traveling and performing. Although blind from infancy, Willie developed a lifelong independence based on his acute sense of hearing., remarkable memory and versatile musical genius.

Willie performed and recorded under many names but favored “Blind Willie” McTell. Best remembered for his blues, McTell, had a remarkable repertoire of blues, spirituals, gospels, rags, fold ballads and popular music. McTell played from “Maine to Mobile Bay”, and at theaters, taverns, road houses, churches, medicine shows, train stations, barbecue joints, house parties, and on the streets.

His blues feature his trademark twelve-string guitar played in rapid and intricate patterns of jagged, shifting rhythms accompanying his clear tenor voice. He started recording in 1927 for RCA Victor Atlantic and the Library of Congress. He last recorded in 1956 and returned to McDuffie County shortly before his death and is buried in the Jones Grove Cemetery. Blind Willie was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame in 1990.

McTell has also played a considerable influence on musicians after him. Performers as diverse as Taj Mahal, the Allman Brothers Band, Ry Cooder, Jack White, and Bob Dylan have covered his songs or singled out the blind guitar player for his influence on their careers.

 

Do you want to learn to play 12-string guitar? Or maybe you are looking to upgrade your equipment. The unmistakable sound of a well-made 12-string guitar is perfect for solo gigs and band performances, especially when it was designed by the founder of influential U.S. punk band Rancid. Tim Armstrong’s Hellcat is based on the old Fender acoustic that was his go-to guitar for songwriting, and quickly became one of the best-selling Fender acoustic artist models ever. With the Tim Armstrong Hellcat-12, that same classic vibe is offered in a 12-string version that simply rocks. Whether it’s alt-folk tunes at the college coffeehouse or slamming punk with a band, the Hellcat-12 combines great acoustic tone with versatile onboard electronics and a satin body and neck finish for smooth playability, all at a surprisingly low cost.

Blind Willie McTell Music Festival

Blind Willie McTell mural located in downtown Thomson.
Blind Willie McTell mural located in downtown Thomson, GA

The legacy of McTell is celebrated each year at the Blind Willie McTell Music Festival held in Thomson, GA. Ticket prices for the event seem quite reasonable. The lineup for 2022 included Jimmie Vaughn, the Texas Gentlemen, Joachim Cooder (son of the legendary Ry Cooder), and more. For more information on the festival check their website.

Sources:

Burditt, Erin. “Guitars are Back.” The McDuffie Progress. April 13, 2021.

Jacobs, Hal. ““Blind Willie” McTell.” New Georgia Encyclopedia, last modified Jun 1, 2020.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

The Rough Guide to Blind Willie McTell is an excellent introduction to the genius that poured from his fingers. It contains 25 key tracks including some of his best known such as Statesboro Blues. Little of the life of McTell is really known and there is no full length biography. To learn more about southern blues I recommend a copy of Red River Blues: The Blues Tradition in the Southeast. Drawing on archives and interviews with musicians, Red River Blues remains an acclaimed work of blues scholarship. Bruce Bastin traces the origins of the music to the turn of the twentieth century, when African Americans rejected slave songs, work songs, and minstrel music in favor of a potent new vehicle for secular musical expression. Bastin looks at the blues’ early emerging popularity and its spread via the Great Migration, delves into a wealth of field recordings, and looks at the careers of Brownie McGhee, Blind Boy Fuller, Curly Weaver, Sonny Terry, and many other foundational artists.

 

 

 

 

 


The Blues Fake Book

from: The Music Stand

The most comprehensive single-volume blues publication ever, with songs spanning the entire history of the genre. Every major blues artist is well-represented, including Howlin’ Wolf, Robert Johnson, B.B. King, Billie Holiday, Leadbelly, Alberta Hunter, Willie Dixon, Muddy Waters, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Witherspoon, Bessie Smith, Sonny Boy Williamson, and scores of others.

 

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Book Review: Civil War Generals of Indiana written by Dr. Carl E. Kramer

Civil War Generals of Indiana

Kramer, Carl E. Civil War Generals of Indiana. Charleston: History Press. 2022. 140 pages, 136 pages of text. Bibliography, b/w images. ISBN 9781467151955, $23.99.

In his acknowledgements and introduction, author Dr. Carl E. Kramer, states that this book has been an off and on-again project for more than sixty years having started it while a freshman in high school in 1961. As with any student new to Civil War studies, the term “General” can be confusing at best, thus Kramer’s long-term quest for clarity.

Let’s count down the opportunities for use of the title along with Dr. Kramer. There are those who receive appointment to the rank of general (brigadier and higher). Of course, during the Civil War that could mean in the regular army or as a general of volunteers. Promotions to the rank of general were nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

Second, you have Brevet Generals, those receiving a sort of temporary promotion to the rank but no real promotion. These brevets were often handed out based upon some noteworthy battle achievement most often made by a colonel or maybe even lieutenant colonel. You weren’t going to be made a brevet general from the rank of sergeant. Brevets to lower officer positions were also possible during the war.

The third opportunity for using the rank of general is from State Troops. These were most often militia groups and the appointment was made by the state governor.

Finally, you have those men who were just called general. They may have received the nickname for being a local leader, maybe it was sarcastic, or perhaps they gave themselves the moniker and it stuck for whatever reason. Needless to say, these men were not generals in the way Kramer is using the term.

As has been pointed out by Andrew Wagenhoffer, the issue of determining who is a Hoosier and who isn’t is a tricky one. Then, as now, people moved around. Family members often followed each other, at times following perceived economic or educational opportunities.

In determining if a “general” was eligible for inclusion, Kramer relied heavily on the standard work in the field, Generals in Blue written by Ezra Kramer. For state level generals, he relied upon Indiana in the War of the Rebellion, a multi volume report issued in 1869 and available in a reprint edition.

Determining a tie to Indiana became more difficult for Dr. Kramer as this can mean differing things to different people. Kramer settled on three criteria for inclusion in his book. The first is birth; anyone born in Indiana who met the other criteria is included. The second qualifying criteria is for men who were born elsewhere but relocated to Indiana and spent a significant part of their lives in the state. The term “significant” is not defined and so this criterion remains vague. The final criteria that merits inclusion is for men “who arrived in Indiana early in the war, played an important role in organizing the state’s military operations and maintained a significant presence after the war.” This criterion is again vague and open to interpretation as the terms important and significant are not defined.

Dover Books

Ultimately, Dr. Kramer has decided upon 121 men; including 44 full United States generals, 1 Confederate general (Francis Asbury Shoup), 62 Union brevet generals, and 14 state service generals. Twenty-one generals were born in Indiana as were 24 brevet generals.

Robert Huston Milroy courtesy Library of Congress
Major General Robert Huston Milroy
Image courtesy Library of Congress

Most of the biographies are one page long. A large number of the entries contain a photo, the majority of which are from the Library of Congress. The short length of each entry makes this book appropriate to pick up and put down at your leisure. Each biography can be read in a matter of a few minutes allowing readers the flexibility to read multiple titles without worries of being bogged down. Biographies can be read in any order with no concern about being confused.

One drawback I did note is that the book does not contain end/foot notes. There is a two-page bibliography however. For me, I would have found it helpful, or at least interesting, if Dr. Kramer had listed a recommended biography (if available) for each of the entries. Brief introductions to these interesting men could leave some readers wanting more. Overall, for a book of this nature these are minor quibbles. It is also possible that the author reached his word count limit. Arcadia/History Press try to stick to specific word counts in order to keep their titles within a page limit and thus helping control price.

For those interested in the role of Indiana in the Civil War this is a book that should be considered. Available at a budget friendly price it allows for a handy reference rather than trying to find Indiana generals at random in Warner.

Arcadia Publishing has generously provided a complimentary review copy of this book. Arcadia Publishing has also published five titles I have written as of the date of this post. This review has not been influenced by these factors and is based upon my reading of the work.

If you would like to read book reviews of other Arcadia/History Press titles, please click HERE. 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.


Civil War Monitor
Civil War Monitor magazine subscription offer
from: College Subscription Services LLC

 

For some of the best in Civil War writing, I invite you to click the photo or link to subscribe to Civil War MonitorIn each issue leading scholars tackle the Civil War head on. Every issue contains book reviews helping you decide on what to read next. Beautifully laid out, this is a bi-monthly magazine you will want to keep for future reference.

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Buy and Sell Your College Textbooks with Confidence

Stack of college textbooks

It’s that time of year where college students are trying to navigate the difficult maze of end-of-semester book selling and beginning-of-semester book buying.

While I have been out of the industry for several years, I spent more than a dozen years in the retail college textbook industry so I do have some insights that may be of help to SAVE YOU MONEY AND FRUSTRATION!

BUYING BOOKS

First off, the internet is your friend. Second off, don’t be afraid to reach out to your professors. And finally, evaluate your options.

FIRST: The internet is your friend

If you are looking to purchase books for next semester, find your college bookstore online. Almost all states require colleges to post booklists several weeks before classes begin. If your school uses a lease operator, they will have the list on their website.

From there, select your course and section to see your book information. Always be sure to have your proposed section number. Different professors may use different books. The information provided online should include the ISBN and current price for new and used options. The ISBN is important in order to make sure you are purchasing the correct book. Put all your items in an online shopping cart or write down the relevant information. Print or save your shopping cart. You will need this information as we proceed.

A word about ISBNs. College textbook publishers and their sales representatives (the root cause of textbook price inflation) are shifty. They often package a bunch of unneeded garbage with your main textbook. Do you really need that study guide, those working papers, that “bonus” material, or online access passcode? Keep reading for my suggestions to get around this foolishness.

A word about required vs. optional. As a student understand optional means you are probably never going to open the book and will kick yourself for shelling out good money on it. If you get into the semester and really need the book, you can buy it later. My recommendation is TO AVOID optional books.

Next, head to Amazon, or another reputable online textbook seller. I have personally used and can recommend eCampus.com. I have bought and sold books through them and have been satisfied with their prices and service. eBay is a landmine where you may or may not get a great deal. Proceed with caution.

eCampus.comOnce on these sites, type in the ISBN of your required books. Again, I recommend only buying from a reputable seller with a RETURN policy. If you buy on eBay from Jimmy, the student at Texas Northern Undergraduate School for High School Dropouts, he is not going to give you your money back if you drop a class, decide to go without the book, or find a copy cheaper. Stick to books sold by eCampus.com, Amazon directly, or someplace similar. Even if eBay requires Jimmy to accept your return (a dicey proposition to be honest), it may take weeks to get your money back.

When your book populates in whatever search engine, be sure to read the item description. Watch for terms such as highlighting, underlining, water damage, etc. Ask the seller questions if you’re in doubt. Again, even authorized returns can be a pain in the neck and will leave you without your money for potentially several weeks.

I can also recommend BOOKFINDER. This service gathers seller options from multiple locations allowing you to compare pricing more efficiently. They do not sell books but rather act as an information clearinghouse. It can be a real time saver.

SECOND: Reach out to your professor

Find out who your professor is going to be. Don’t be afraid to drop by their office during posted office hours. Ask them if they really use the book. Often, required may really mean optional. Accreditation boards don’t like to see courses without required materials. At times, departments make book decisions for all instructors. Your instructor may hate the book selected and goes without. Won’t you feel silly having bought a $125 book that never gets cracked open.

Ask for a copy of the syllabus. For one thing, you will learn is this a class your really want to take. Is there going to be 1,000 pages of reading and three major papers or is it more laid back. In the syllabus, you will also find out about textbook usage. Professors often include quite a bit of guidance in these documents. Look it over.

Can’t find your professor in person? Email them of course and respectfully ask their advice. Is the current edition required or can you get by with an earlier edition. TRUE STORY: One time when I had a lot of time in my store, I went through a new edition and old edition math book. I checked probably 100 pages and several hundred exercises. I found ZERO differences in the book, not even page number changes. That’s right, not a single difference. The book had a new cover, but I couldn’t see the difference. That’s not to say there weren’t changes, but you get what I am saying.

Still not getting an answer from your professor, ask the department administrative assistant or friends who have taken the class. Heck, you may be able to borrow a book from them. On that subject, a trend when I was working in textbooks was for departments to have loaner copies for students in financial need. It didn’t happen often but every now and then they were able to assist.

THIRD: Evaluate your options

By now you have an idea of whether your professor is going to use the book. Can you get away with an old edition. Is the book not going to be used until late in the semester.

Review online pricing and compare to your campus store. Don’t wait too long to purchase at either location whatever route you choose to go. The best books at the best prices sell quickly.

If buying on campus and they have used, be sure to examine the book, looking for excessive wear, stains, missing pages, etc. You don’t want to stand in that VERY LONG refund line the first week of class.

If buying online, don’t wait until too late to order. Used books will sell out and you have to factor in processing and shipping time. If you wait until classes start, you may not get your book until the second or third week of class and can easily find yourself behind. Remember, classes are starting for hundreds of schools at the same time. Thousands of students are doing the same thing you are.

Another option I  have not yet discussed is your school library. Professors will often put copies of required and optional texts on reserve for the semester. This will allow you free access, on a first come first serve basis, to your materials. If they haven’t done this, ask one of the school librarians if this is possible. They are there to assist you and will usually be glad to assist.

Finally comes the option of renting your books. This can be a real cost saver if you shop around AND will be cautious with your books. Rentals can work exceedingly well for new edition books. You get a price break from new prices, the rental company knows they are going to get their book back and can sell or rent it again. A SERIOUS WORD OF CAUTION is to read and understand your rental agreement. It is a contract and can be a costly one if you fail to uphold your end of the deal. Make sure you know when your book has to be returned and don’t be late. Also, don’t spill your beer all over that brand new $200 book. They aren’t going to accept it back without penalty. A final word, don’t think of skipping out on the agreement. Those computer systems are nasty and will never forget you. Try to sell back a book? Try to rent again? Maybe even try to buy again? Forget it. Also, remember, they have your credit card information AND your signed permission to charge you whatever amount is shown in the agreement. You will be paying for the book, I can promise you. College bookstores, especially lease operators, don’t play around.

SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS

Almost without exception, you will never open an old textbook again. There may be a couple of exceptions I will discuss below.

First off, time can be your enemy. Second off, the internet is your friend. Thirdly, talk to your major professors ahead of time. Finally, evaluate your options and move quickly.

FIRST: Time can be your enemy

So, what do I mean by time can be your enemy. Nothing stinks worse than an old edition textbook. It is big, heavy to move, and serves as a constant reminder of how many six packs could have been bought with that money. When a publisher announces a new edition, the national wholesale market usually dies a very quick and painful death. By this I mean, the big online sellers, almost immediately stop buying them. You will find eCampus.com prices drop to zero even for frontline texts.

The reason for new editions is often, even if the publisher has 1,000 copies in the warehouse, they will force out the new edition to kill the used book market. Publishers and authors see ZERO money from used books. It is in the publisher interest to provide updated books to keep revenues flowing.

In some instances, this is justified. If you are nursing student, or studying in a rapidly evolving field, you need the latest. I know it can be painful, but you deserve it, employers deserve it, and those you serve once you graduate deserve it.

However, what used to kill me was when a math or English book would be revised every couple of years. The truth is there is no need for such other than profit. That profit was geared toward the publisher. I know the bookstore takes a lot of grief, and sometimes deserved, but they are more than likely on your side here. Used books are better for the store. I’ll cover the basic math or college textbooks in another post some time.

Time is your enemy in another manner. Brick and mortar bookstores determine very early on how many copies of a book they need for the upcoming semester. They have extensive sales history on each course, section, professor,  title, etc. I am sure this detail has only gotten more in depth since I left the industry. Many times, no human decision making is involved in this process. The computer spits out a number and that’s it. 

If a bookstore knows that historically they only sell 50% of estimated enrollment, they are going to stock maybe 45-60% or estimated enrollment. Meaning, if the biology department (home of expensive texts) tells the bookstore they expect 100 students to take BIO 200 the store is only going to allocate for maybe 55. (See how they have empty shelves sometimes. It’s all a guessing game.)

Sales history also tells them they traditionally purchase 20 copies from students after the fall semester. The textbook manager may then allocate 18 of the 55 to purchase from students. She then sources for the other 37 copies.

For popular texts she may find those 37 used books leaving only 18 to be purchased at the highest price (up to 50% of the original retail price) from students. You better get there quickly to get that price!

After she buys 18 student copies the price drops. What does it drop to? Good question. That lower price is based upon a national wholesale price depending upon what company the bookstore is selling books to. Prices are generally less than 25% of retail. Often times, considerably less.

Why the perceived low value? There is a lot of financial risk in used books. Again, a new edition can be announced at any time and a wholesaler does not want left with hundreds of copies of a dead book.

The wholesaler must pay the bookstore a commission for handling the transaction. If a bookstore pays $20 wholesale, they will also be paid a percentage commission, maybe upwards of 20%, or $4, on top of recouping their $20.

Books are expensive to ship and time consuming to sort at warehouses. All this plays into the investment a wholesaler has committed to these books.

Based upon all these costs, wholesalers just can’t pay a large percentage of retail. Popular and newer releases of course have higher buyback percentages. You learned about supply and demand in your economics class, you know, the book you are now trying to sell.

Turn Your Books Into Cash! Sell Your Textbooks at eCampus.com.

SECOND: The internet is your friend

Many used book companies will purchase your books through online transactions. The company I have recommendedeCampus.com, is just such a company.

Log on to their site, enter your ISBNs and receive a possible price you will receive for your books. Many online buyers will provide you with a postpaid label saving you time and money. Securely pack up your books with whatever packing list the buyer provides (they often need this to scan your books and make sure YOU get paid), mail them by the appropriate method and in a couple of weeks, voila, cash!

eCampus.com offers payment in several methods: PayPal, check, in-store credit. Choose what works best for you.

A word of advice is don’t lie to these companies. Don’t include books on your selling list you don’t send, be honest about the condition of your books, and ship promptly.

Look, mistakes happen. Maybe you meant to delete a book off your packing list and didn’t. They aren’t going to make a mistake and pay you for it. Promise. If you send books that have excessive wear, stains, highlighting, whatever, you can expect to receive a message with an adjusted offer, or no offer at all. You may then be out the sale price AND the book unless you want to pay to have it returned to you. Buying offers have time limits. Don’t wait three weeks to ship your books. The period of highest demand will most likely be over and you may receive that dreaded email with an adjusted offer.

Other internet options are selling the books yourself. If you care to take the time to become an Amazon seller and want to deal with their fees, knock yourself out. Yes, Amazon will also sell your books on your behalf but be prepared to pay even more to them. I promise, it’s not cheap.

eBay is another selling option but be prepared for difficult transactions. Not only can buyers be difficult at times, but eBay also itself is no charm, especially for sellers in any type of dispute. Plus, you then have the high final value fees eating at your revenues in addition to having to package and ship your books individually. It can be a cutthroat industry.

Facebook Marketplace is an option as are any social media groups associated with your college. Perhaps your school runs a book exchange day or something similar for students. You can often post fliers on school bulletin boards. If you are in a Greek organization, perhaps you can swap books with members.

THIRD: Talk to your professors

You may want to check with your professors (see above) before selling certain books. Your instructors have no vested financial interest and should be a source of solid advice.

Are you taking a continuation course? ENC 100 to ENC 200 or something similar. Is the second course using the same book? How silly will you feel having to buy a book for full retail that you just sold two weeks prior for 20% of retail.

You may also wish to check with your faculty advisor or a trusted faculty member in your major before selling back books in your field. Yes, I said above you will probably never open an old textbook again, but that might not be true for books in your major. This may be particularly true for fields such as English and history.

Do you plan to attend graduate school? If so, are any of your texts core basic works that you may need in the future?

FINALLY: Evaluate your options

It’s up to you as to how you wish to proceed. Since most students never return to read a college textbook, my recommendation is to get rid of them as quickly as possible.

You may receive the highest price from your campus bookstore if they are purchasing it to put on their shelves for sale. You will usually have to wait in a long line to find out your prices, however. They won’t quote you a price over the phone or email.

Selling to an online seller is the quickest way to be rid of books, especially if you are headed home for the holidays and don’t want to cart them around. You won’t get the absolute highest price but for ease and convenience this might be an option for you to consider.

Selling to classmates at the start of classes is an option but students aren’t going to want to pay a lot and may not have cash handy. Online payments come with the possibility of a chargeback. You are then out your book and the money.

Conclusion

Yes, every semester the textbook dance can be difficult and frustrating. Don’t let it dampen your college experience. It is only a small part of attending college and it can teach valuable financial decision-making skills. Once you have been through it a time or two, you will navigate the bookstore like a pro. 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

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Plan Your Golf Vacation in Volusia County Florida

LPGA Hills Course Hole 8

Where to Plan your Golf Vacation in Volusia County, Florida

Are you planning your vacation to Volusia County? Maybe you will be visiting for one of the NASCAR races or motorcycle event. You or your children might be attending a convention at the Ocean Center. Perhaps you or a family member attend Stetson University or Bethune Cookman University. Maybe you are looking for the opportunity to drive on the “World’s Most Famous Beach.”

Whatever your reason for being in Volusia County we welcome you. Now, what do you do if you are a golfer. If you have a few hours there are multiple options available for you to consider so be sure to pack your clubs!

Below is a listing of golf courses located in Volusia County. I have chosen to make this list alphabetical by city and then by course. Here you’ll find an address, website information, and a brief bit on the course/s.

This list should help you find the right course and help you get the most out of your golf game in Volusia County.

Daytona Beach

Daytona Beach Golf Club
Daytona Beach Golf Club

Daytona Beach Golf Club North                                                          600 Wilder Boulevard                                                    https://www.daytonabeachgc.com/

The North course was designed be Slim Deathridge in 1946. Mr. Deathridge served as Head Professional at the time. The course was rebuilt in 1997. This is a par 72 course with the longest tees being 6,413 yards. This is considered to be the tougher of the two Daytona Beach Golf Club courses.

Book your tee time online, take advantage of the putting green and driving range, sign up for individual instruction, or shop at the pro shop for all your golfing needs or for club repair. Grab a meal at the Sand Trap Bar and Grill.

 

 

Daytona Beach Golf Club South                                                                                                                             600 Wilder Boulevard                                                                                                                                         https://www.daytonabeachgc.com/

The South course was designed by Donald Ross and measures in at 6,229 yards with a par of 71.

Donald Ross Courses Everyone Can Play
Donald Ross Golf Courses Everyone Can Play

Ever wonder what it would be like to play the same golf courses as celebrities such as Tiger Woods, Gary Player, Mark O’Meara, and even Babe Ruth? A celebrity in his own right, Donald Ross created many of the best golf courses ever designed. Here is the definitive collection of golf courses in the United States created by Ross, the most prolific and renowned golf course designer of all time. Paul and B. J. Dunn have collected all the information you need in order to find and play the more than one-hundred public, semi-private, and resort golf courses in the United States, all designed by Ross.

Get your own copy of this beautiful book HERE!

 

 

 

 

LPGA Hills Course Hole 8
The Eighth hole on the LPGA Hills course

LPGA International Hills Course                                                           1000 Champions Drive                                                                 https://lpgainternational.com/

Playing just under 7,000 yards, the Arthur Hills designed course is a par 72 that has been rated 4 stars by Golf Digest. Hills designed this course around nature. As such it features wetlands, pine trees, and water hazards.

Memberships are available at multiple levels. Practice with ten target pins or on the six putting greens, several with sand bunkers allowing for additional practice opportunities. Book your tee time online and enjoy a delicious meal at Malcolm’s Bar and Grill.

 

 

LPGA International Jones Course                                                                                                                            1000 Champions Drive                                                                                                                                         https://lpgainternational.com/

The Rees Jones designed course is considered a favorite among touring professionals. This 7,100-yard, par 72 course is challenging enough to have earned a 4 star distinction from Golf Digest who also named it number six in its 2010 listing of top 50 American courses for women.

Pelican Bay Golf Club                                                                                                                                          350 Pelican Bay Drive                                                                                                                                  https://golfatpelicanbay.com/

Bill Amick designed this 6,800-yard, par 72 course. This course has served as host to two Senior PGA Tour events.

Book tee times online. The practice facility includes target greens, a pitching complex, a practice bunker, driving range and two putting/chipping greens. After a round of golf enjoy lunch at The Pub.

Daytona Beach Shores

Oceans Golf ClubOceans Golf Club                                                                              2 Oceans West Boulevard                                            http://www.oceansgolfclub.com/

This public course is a 13-hole, par 3 course that measures about 1,150 yards. This might be an option if you are pressed for time.

This is a walking course only. Club and bag rental are available.

 

 

 

 

DeBary

DeBary Golf and Country Club
DeBary Golf and Country Club

DeBary Golf & Country Club                                                         300 Plantation Club Drive                                                                    https://www.debarycc.com/

This semiprivate course has been rated 4 stars by Golf Digest. At almost 6,800 yards at its longest, this par 72 features water on the 9th and 18th holes. The course is a past US Open qualifying site.

Book your tee time online or sign up for private instructions. A restaurant with an extensive menu is available. You can make restaurant reservations online if you wish.

 

DeLand

Victoria Hills Golf Club                                                                                                                                          300 Spalding Way                                                                                                                                               http://www.victoriahillsgolf.com/

This 7,150-yard course was designed by Ron Garl is located on over 200 acres. The course features both water and sand hazards. Golfweek has called this course among Florida’s top 15 public courses.

Book your tee time online or over the phone. Lessons and personalized instruction are available. Do you have a big event coming up? Consider hosting it onsite. Multiple locations with scenic views are available. Be sure to grab a bite to eat at the Sparrow’s Grille Restaurant.

Deltona

The Deltona Club                                                                                                                                                 1120 Elkcam Boulevard                                                                                                                                      https://thedeltonaclub.com/

Designed by Bobby Weed, this award-winning public course measures just slightly under 7,000 yards and shoots a par 72.

Reserve your tee time online. Golf lessons are available from club pros. After your round drop into the Deltona Club Café for a meal.

New Smyrna Beach

Hidden Lakes Golf Club                                                                                                                                        35 Fairgreen Avenue                                                                                                                                            http://www.hiddenlakesgolfclub.com/

Playing at almost 5,900 yards at its longest, this par 69 is a favorite of the many snowbirds who arrive each winter in New Smyrna Beach. Despite the somewhat short distance the course features three, par five holes.

Book your tee time online, lessons are available for golfers of all ages and abilities, and when you are finished stop in to the 19th Hole Restaurant for a full assortment of foods that will leave you satisfied.

New Smyrna Golf Club
New Smyrna Golf Club

New Smyrna Golf Club                                                                   1000 Wayne Avenue                                                                       http://newsmyrnagolfclub.com/

This public course was designed by Donald Ross and opened to the public in 1953. The course was renovated in 2016. This is a par 72 course with a distance of slightly over 6,500 yards. Reasonable rates and large numbers of snowbirds make early tee times difficult during the winter months. Be sure to grab lunch and a beer at Tiano’s. 

 

Book your tee time online (this course gets very busy in the winter) and be sure to stop in to the pro shop for all your equipment needs. Amenities include a driving range, putting green, practice bunker, chipping green, and professional lessons. Stop in at Tianos for delicious Italian themed food after your round.

Are you in New Smyrna Beach and looking for pizza? Tiano’s is a great option. Take a look at my NSB pizza recommendations and find the perfect dinner for your family! You won’t find any of the big chains on this list. Be sure to support your local restaurant owner.

 

The Preserve at Turnbull Bay                                                                                                                                 2600 Turnbull Estates Drive                                                                                                                                  https://www.thepreserveatturnbull.com/

This 6,600-yard, par 72 course, designed by Gary Wintz, runs through the Turnbull Bay nature preserve. Water is to be found throughout the course.

Book your tee time online for this beautiful course. Stop in to the Pro Shop for all your last minute needs: clothes, balls, bags, shoes, gloves, and any other golf supply you can think of. The club features a snack bar with a basic lineup of quick foods. Beer and wine are available.

Venetian Bay Golf Course
Venetian Bay

Venetian Bay                                                                                  63 North Airport Road                                                                      https://venetianbaygolf.com/

Designed by CEC Design, Venetian Bay, considered by many the premiere course in New Smyrna Beach,  Venetian Bay measures almost 7,100 yards from the back tees and shoots a par 72. You start right out of the gate with an incredible 500+ yard par 5.

Book your tee time online then show up to the well stocked Pro Shop. Here you will find all the top names in golf equipment and apparel. They can even regrip your clubs for you. Private lessons are available at varying price points. Dining is available in the Champions Grille Restaurant. Members have access to the swim club and other amenities.

 

Ormond Beach

Halifax Plantation Golf Club                                                                                                                                  3400 Clubhouse Drive                                                                                                                                        https://www.halifaxplantationgc.com/

This Bill Amick designed course plays at 7,100 yards at its longest with a par of 72. The course is noted for its picturesque views and rolling terrain. New grass in 2021 has increased the quality of play.

Reserve your tee time online. A PGA certified instructor is on staff to help you improve your game with private lessons. The Tavern Restaurant offers golfers and excellent meal option. The restaurant has varied hours by day.

Riviera Country Club                                                                                                                                           500 Calle Grande Street                                                                                                                                         https://www.rivcc.com/

Expanded to 18-holes in 1954, this course has been updated several times by golf architects including Mark Mahana, Dave Wallace, and Lloyd Clifton. The course measures 6,250 yards and is a par 71. This family owned course is part of the Florida Historic Golf Trail.

Call to reserve your tee time. Once there, get a bucket of range balls and warm up on the driving range. Most greens fees include cart rental. Stop in at the Pro Shop for all your golfing needs from top manufacturers. Breakfast and lunch year round, and it appears there is a dinner buffet during the winter months.

Port Orange

Crane Lakes Golf & Country Club                                                                                                                          1850 Crane Lakes Boulevard                                                                                                                    https://www.cranelakesgolf.com/

This is a semi-private 18-hole course designed to challenge any skill level. Rates depend upon season and time of day. Par 66 course that measures 5,186 yards from the furthest tees.

Reserve a tee time online then head over to the Golf Shop for any items you may need for your bag: clubs, balls, gloves, you name it. Practice facilities include a driving range, chipping green, and a putting green. Crane’s Roost Bar & Grill offer golfers a place to rest and unwind after playing 18.

Cypress Head Golf Club                                                                                                                                       6231 Palm Vista Street                                                                                                                                     https://www.cypressheadgolf.com/

Designed by architects Arthur Hills and Mike Dasher in 1992 this is a public course owned by the City of Port Orange. This course measures in at just under 6,800 yards from the longest tees with a par of 72.

Book your tee time online. Improve your game by signing up for one of the many clinics offered onsite. After shooting 18, finish your day at Flagsticks at Cypress Head.

Spruce Creek Country Club                                                                                                                            1900 Country Club Drive                                                                                                                                       https://www.sprucecreekclub.com/

This semi-private course was designed by Bill Amick. The back tees are slightly over 6,800 yards with a par of 72. You may encounter arriving or departing planes as the course is adjacent to the fly-in. Trees and water hazards highlight the course.

Reserve your tee time online. Call to reserve you table at the Prop n’ Fore Bar and Grille with salads, sandwiches, and full entrees. After playing and eating, you may want to look into a membership which is available at different levels and perks.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

Esquire is one of the premiere magazines geared toward men available today. Keep up with the latest in all areas important to you with a discount subscription. Click the photo or the highlighted link for exclusive savings and you’ll be enjoying your first issue in no time.


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“Three Blind Mice” Leads to Ejection of Daytona Cubs Intern During 2012 Game

Derek Dye

Every professional baseball player is going to have a run in with an umpire at some point. Umpires are human and are going to make bad calls. Calling balls and strikes at 95+ miles per hour is subjective no matter what the official baseball rule book might say. Bang-bang plays at a base can be just as difficult as an umpire may be partially shielded and at times, they just make a bad call. Modern replay and the challenge system are helping to lessen the impact of these calls but in years past, player or manager confrontations with umpires were more commonplace.

Usually not a lot comes of it. The player may argue for a bit while walking away. When a call appears to be particularly egregious the manager may come bolting out of the dugout. Usually, he already knows he is going to get tossed but these actions are not meant to change calls but to support and fire up his team and their fans.

Some managers have been known for their tantrums. Bobby Cox holds the all-time record for most ejections with a whopping 162, equal to the number of games played in a complete season. Others well known for arguing calls and being ejected are Tony La Russa, Lou Pinella, and Bruce Bochy.

You can review career ejection numbers on this page.

Watch as Pirates manager Lloyd McClendon gets ejected in this classic clip.

For players, coaches, and umpires, life in the minor leagues can be a drag with long bus rides, low pay, and the reality that very few of them will ever make it to the majors. Umpires have an approximately three percent chance of making it to the “show.” It’s a dream though that dozens chase every year. In fact, Daytona Beach is home to one of the most famous umpiring schools; the Wendelstedt Umpire School.

Want to know more about what it is like to be a Major League umpire? Read Called Out but Safe: A Baseball Umpire’s Journey. 

If an umpire could steal the show in a Major League game, Al Clark might well have been the one to do it. Tough but fair, in his thirty years as a professional umpire he took on some of baseball’s great umpire baiters, such as Earl Weaver, Billy Martin, and Dick Williams, while ejecting any number of the game’s elite—once tearing a hamstring in the process. He was the first Jewish umpire in American League history, and probably the first to eject his own father from the officials’ dressing room. But whatever Clark was doing—officiating at Nolan Ryan’s three hundredth win, Cal Ripken’s record breaker, or the “earthquake” World Series of 1989, or braving a labor dispute, an anti-Semitic tirade by a Cy Young Award winner, or a legal imbroglio—it makes for a good story. Click the link or the photo to order your own copy. 

For fans, these minor league games can be quite entertaining. Teams run fun promotions, there’s a chance to see legitimate major leaguers on a rehab assignment, and prices are usually very reasonable, especially in comparison to major league prices.

Fans at Jackie Robinson Ballpark were treated to some unexpected entertainment on August 1, 2012. That night during a close game between the home team Daytona Cubs and visiting Fort Myers Miracle in a Florida State League game, fans witnessed an ejection that could not have been predicted.

Voices from the Great Black Baseball Leagues: Revised EditionTo learn more about historic Jackie Robinson Ballpark, click HERE.

Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier playing a spring training game for the Brooklyn Dodgers at what was then City Island Ballpark. Robinson and others players excelled in the Negro Leagues for years before being given the opportunity to prove their skills in Major League Baseball. Learn more about this time of segregated baseball I recommend reading Voices from the Great Black Baseball Leagues: Revised Edition. Click the link or the photo to get your own copy of this book.

Brian Harper of the Chicago Cubs poses during Photo Day on Monday, February 27, 2012 at Hohokam Stadium in Mesa, Arizona. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images)

 

With the game hanging in the balance during the top of the eighth inning, Miracle batter Andy Leer grounded a pitch to Cubs shortstop Tim Saunders, who threw low to first base. Field umpire Ramon Hernandez ruled that first baseman Taylor Davis bobbled the throw and called Leer safe.

Daytona Beach Cubs manager, and former major leaguer, Brian Harper came out to argue the call with Hernandez while home plate umpire Mario Seneca stood by taking stock of the situation.

Derek Dye
Derek Dye
Photo courtesy Nigel Cook/Daytona Beach News Journal

Seated in the press box was twenty-one-year-old intern Derek Dye, who attempted to poke some home-team humor at the umpires and over the public address system played the children’s song “Three Blind Mice.”

Seneca was in no mood for humor and turned to the press box, picked out the culprit, and yelled out, “You’re gone,” motioning the ejection. Seneca took his ire even further, silencing the sound system for the remainder of the game. That’s right. No announcing of batters, no music, no between innings sound system.

 

At first there was a bit of confusion. Those in the press box through that Harper had been ejected despite not vociferously arguing. They quickly realized it was University of Illinois senior, intern, Dye that had been given the boot.

The small crowd of less than 1,000 reacted as would be expected, showering the umpiring crew (all two of them) with boos. Cubs staff was quick to improvise however and a staffer in the grandstand took to shouting the names of each batter in turn. The tired crowd played along clapping and stomping their feet, showing support for their beloved Cubs.

When the final batter struck out in the top of the ninth inning, the Cubs were 2-1 winners over the Miracle and fans left Jackie Robinson Ballpark with a story that almost had to be seen to be believed.

The Cubs and Miracle took to the field the next evening with the same umpiring crew. Intern Derek Dye was not in the press box however. Feeling lighter in the wallet thanks to a $25 fine from the Florida State League, Dye was handing out wristbands, helping identify fans as being 21 years or older in order to participate in the “Thirsty Thursday” promotion that evening.


Dye, and some fans in attendance, questioned the authority of Seneca to eject a non-participant in the game. Dye was quoted afterward, “I couldn’t believe it. I didn’t think the umpire had that sort of jurisdiction. I haven’t seen the flow chart of who has what power.”

While Dye may have questioned Seneca’s judgement, it appears that the umpire was well within his authority, and was not the first to do such. In an article in Bleacher Report they cited three rules Seneca invoked.

Paraphrased:

Rule 4.06(a)—participants should not incite or try to incite a demonstration by spectators

Rule 9.01 (b)—umpires have the duty to order a player, and others, to do or refrain from doing anything that impacts the administration of these rules and to enforce penalties

Rule 9.01(c)—umpires have authority to rule on any point not specifically covered in these rules

So, while Seneca may have seemed thin-skinned and quick on the trigger, Dye’s actions were considered worthy of ejection by the league who handed down the token fine. For Dye, he received an immediate, if short lived, burst of fame. It was reported that interview requests were submitted by ESPN and the “Good Morning America” show and the young intern signed several autographs for knowing fans.

Neither Mario Seneca or Ramon Hernandez was able to beat the odds. Neither umpired in the major leagues.

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Abraham Lincoln and the Gettysburg Address November 19, 1863

Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg
Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg
Photo is a reprint of a small detail of a photo showing the crowd gathered for the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Penn., where President Abraham Lincoln gave his now famous speech, the Gettysburg Address. Lincoln is visible facing the crowd, not wearing a hat, about an inch below the third flag from the left. Josephine Cobb first found Lincoln’s face while working with a glass plate negative at the National Archives in 1952. (Source: NARA, Rare Photo of Lincoln at Gettysburg, http://blogs.archives.gov/prologue/?p=2564)

In a speech of just over 250 words, and only two minutes long, President Abraham Lincoln provided a “few appropriate remarks” summarizing the national situation and reminding those in attendance that the work started must be completed. Union forces must continue to fight in order to preserve the nation.

While Lincoln was in Gettysburg, he stayed at the David Wills House, located in downtown Gettysburg at Lincoln Square. The house is operated by the National Park Service and admission is free. It is recommended to check the website before visiting as hours do change throughout the year. Here, you can visit the room where President Lincoln put the final touches on what might be his most famous speech.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coloring Books to Relax

The text below is quoted from the Bliss Copy of the address as provided by the National Park Service. To learn about the five differing versions of the Gettysburg Address please visit Abraham Lincoln Online.

Gettysburg Address

Delivered at Gettysburg, PA

Nov. 19th 1863

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate — we cannot consecrate — we cannot hallow –this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Lincoln’s speech, which is often quoted, has been analyzed and interpreted since it was given. There are several worthwhile books on the subject of the address and the creation of the Gettysburg National Cemetery. Below are several I recommend.


The Emerging Civil War Series is highly respected for the continual high level of scholarship these books include. Dr. Brad Gottfried is a respected academic who has served as a professor, college president, and author. His book Lincoln Comes to Gettysburg is a perfect introduction to the topic. At less than 200 pages and around $15 this is an amazing value for anybody interested in the Civil War, Gettysburg in particular, or Abraham Lincoln.

 

 

 

Perhaps the standard work on the topic is that of Gary Wills and his masterful Lincoln at Gettysburg.

By examining both the address and Lincoln in their historical moment and cultural frame, Wills breathes new life into words we thought we knew, and reveals much about a president so mythologized but often misunderstood. Wills shows how Lincoln came to change the world and to effect an intellectual revolution, how his words had to and did complete the work of the guns, and how Lincoln wove a spell that has not yet been broken.

 

 

For those a bit more advanced in your studies, I recommend seeking out The Gettysburg Gospel by Gabor Boritt.

The words Abraham Lincoln spoke at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery at Gettysburg comprise perhaps the most famous speech in history. Many books have been written about the Gettysburg Address and yet, as Lincoln scholar Gabor Boritt shows, there is much that we don’t know about the speech. In The Gettysburg Gospel he tears away a century of myths, lies, and legends to give us a clear understanding of the greatest American’s greatest speech.

 

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