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Roy Nelson New Smyrna Beach Police Officer: In Memory

Roy Nelson New Smyrna Beach Police Officer In Memory

In Memory Officer Roy L. Nelson New Smyrna Beach Police Department

This post is in memory of officer Roy L. Nelson of the New Smyrna Beach, FL Police Department. Officer Nelson and his police K-9 Caesar perished in an automobile accident while on duty, August 13, 2005.

I invite you to read my other blog posts for law enforcement officers from Volusia and Flagler counties in Florida, who have died in the line of duty. You may find the master list and links to individual posts using THIS LINK. Research is ongoing for this project. If you have information or photos you would like to share, please drop me a line. I would love to be able to give you credit for your contribution.

 

 

Officer Roy L. Nelson New Smyrna Beach Police obituary photoOfficer Roy Nelson New Smyrna Beach Police

According to NSBPD Sergeant Mike Brouillette, Officer Roy L. Nelson, K-9 handler and officer on the New Smyrna Beach police department was described as having a “heart of gold” and that “he loved his job and loved being a k-9 handler.” Volusia County Sheriff’s K-9 officer Jeff Harting added, “He was a good guy. He was good-hearted and very dedicated to K-9.”

Nelson’s death shook fellow officers deeply. He was the first New Smyrna Beach police officer to die in the line of duty. Not only did Nelson perish, his faithful K-9, Caesar, a companion of two years on the force, also perished in a terrifying, high-speed, single car automobile accident. The circumstances surrounding the accident, were slow in coming, and were often contradictory.

Roy L. Nelson grew up in Lakeland, FL where his father served as a corrections officer. According to family, Nelson became interested in law enforcement after stopping to assist an injured motorcyclist. After serving as a volunteer firefighter, he would later spend five years as a Polk County firefighter before realizing his career dream of law enforcement with the New Smyrna Beach Police Department. His mother recalled him as “a wonderful son, always the first to learn everything.”

Community support in the days after Nelson’s death was overwhelming. Residents and law enforcement throughout the state provided food, emotional support, and even patrol support in order to help the family and police force cope and recover. “People want to help in whatever way they can” said Commander Bill Schulz of the Port Orange police department. The Volusia County Sheriffs office also provided deputies to help cover shifts. The City of Edgewater provided patrol officers for the night of Nelson’s accident, allowing fellow officers to grieve.

Coronado Community United Methodist Church served as host for Officer Nelson’s funeral service. More than 600 law enforcement officers were in attendance. None left the services with a dry eye. More than 250 law enforcement vehicles served as an escort for the coffin containing the body of Nelson and the ashes of Caeasar.  Sea Pines Memorial Gardens is where Nelson and Caesar were laid to rest. The service featured a 21 gun salute, taps, and a four-helicopter flyover in the missing man formation.

The service ended with a traditional call over the police radio, “RCC to Kilo-2000, RCC to Kilo-2000, RCC to Kilo-2000. RCC to all listening units. RCC to all listening stations. This is to inform you that K-9 officer Roy Nelson and his faithful partner, Caesar, have reached their final resting place and will forever be 10-7.”

 

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The Fatal Accident

Officer Nelson and K-9 Caesar died in a violent automobile accident. The details surrounding the accident were at best sketchy and often times reported before all information was fully clear.

Officer Roy L. Nelson was on duty the evening of Saturday, August 13, 2005. He was beachside at the time when he took off at a high rate of speed crossing the south causeway bridge. Officer Nelson was not wearing his seatbelt. Officer Nelson was not flashing his emergency lights and did not have his siren on when he seemingly lost control of his vehicle, hitting a guardrail, before his cruiser flipped. Shortly after 11:45 p.m., Nelson and Caesar were pronounced dead at the scene of the accident.

In the immediate aftermath of the accident, the New Smyrna Beach police would state that Nelson was responding to a burglary call. The Florida Highway Patrol began to investigate the accident. An unnamed witness provided information that a white, late model pickup had been seen turning east on the South Causeway, before Nelson’s crash. There was no indication that Nelson’s patrol car made contact with this vehicle.

In the preliminary FHP report, they stated that Nelson was  responding to a “law enforcement call.” He was travelling in excess of 70mph in a 50mph zone. He was not wearing his seat belt and his flashers and siren were not activated. The report references a white pick up which pulled into Nelson’s path. Nelson swerved to avoid the truck, swerved back when he hit a guardrail, spun clockwise, flipped, and hit another guardrail, before coming to a stop.

The New Smyrna Beach Police Department provided contradictory information in the same newspaper article referenced above. A police representative states, “We are speculating as to what happened. There was no radio traffic.” No radio traffic threw into question the FHP report stating Nelson was responding to a “law enforcement call.” The NSBPD proposed several hypotheticals as to what Nelson was doing.

In the weeks following, 71-year-old Gordon Camp came forward as a person of interest. According Camp’s attorney at the time, he and his wife were returning from a party and were in the median turning east on the Causeway when Ms. Camp saw a police car “shoot” behind them at a high rate of speed with no lights or siren. They continued home, not realizing that Nelson had crashed his patrol car.

In early November, 2005, the Florida Highway Patrol recommended felony charges be filed against the Camps for leaving the scene of an accident involving death. The state attorney’s office responded, “Our review of the report requires that additional investigation is needed before we make any decision whether or not to file charges.” It is important to remember, the state attorney did not have a final report from the Florida Highway Patrol at that time and that the vehicles of Nelson and Camp did not collide.

Nearly a year and a half later, the state attorney’s office declined to pursue charges against Camp. Reasons included that “based upon physical evidence, eyewitness interviews, and accident reconstruction experts, investigators with the State Attorney’s Office determined Gordon Camp did not cause the accident that killed Officer Roy Nelson.” The state attorney’s office added that according to the final FHP report, Nelson was travelling in excess of 115 mph without his emergency lights or sirens activated.

Roy Nelson’s widow, Angie, filed a wrongful death lawsuit in the amount of $3 million against Gordon and Bonni Camp in May 2006. After the state attorney declined to press charges, the Camp’s attorney, Michael Lambert, stated, “It will become very expensive for Miss Nelson to bring the Camps in any greater than their policy limit. Its very unusual where you have a case of no contact. And if you look at the terrain down there, it would be very difficult for (Nelson) to maneuver at that speed.”

Volusia County Courts dismissed the case of Angelique R. Nelson vs. Gordon Camp and Bonni Davis Camp on January 7, 2009. The parties reached an out of court settlement.

The Aftermath

Officer Roy L. Nelson has not been forgotten.

Visit an online memorial to Nelson HERE.

Law Enforcement Memorial Volusia and Flagler Counties Roy Nelson New Smyrna Beach Police Officer In MemoryThe Law Enforcement Memorial to Volusia and Flagler Counties features Nelson’s name. This impressive monument is located outside the Indiana Avenue entrance to the Historic Volusia County Courthouse in DeLand, FL.

A small marker dedicated to Nelson and Caesar is located on the South Causeway Bridge near the location where both officers lost their lives. This marker can only be accessed safely on foot while crossing the bridge.

The memory of Roy Nelson New Smyrna Beach Police officer is never far from officers hearts and minds. Located at the NSB Police headquarters is an impressive memorial to Officer Nelson.

Roy Nelson New Smyrna Beach Police Officer In Memory
This beautiful memorial to Roy Nelson New Smyrna Beach Police Officer is located outside the NSBPD station. It serves as a fitting and lasting memorial to the beloved officer who gave his life on duty. The police station is located at 246 Industrial Park Boulevard, near the airport.

 

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Sources

Daytona Beach News Journal–Numerous articles provide the basis for this post. I generously acknowledge their contribution.

The Ledger–This is the local newspaper in Lakeland. I discovered Nelson’s early interest in law enforcement from this newspaper.

Volusia County Clerk of Court

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. Affiliate programs or sponsors providing products do not influence the views and opinions shared in this blog. 

 

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The Best Events and Festivals in Florida in April 2024

The Best Events and Festivals in Florida

Are you searching for the best events and festivals in Florida in April 2024? Thanks for visiting. Please use the links below to find fun events for all ages.

Florida hosts some amazing events and festivals. Each month I hope to take a look at a dozen or so of these in hopes of bringing you fun, exciting, and unexpected ways to enjoy our state.

If you have an event or know of one coming up that you feel should be highlighted, please drop me a line with as much information as you can, including a website. I’ll be glad to include your suggestions in future posts.

I have listed events in date order.

Barista Warrior - Become a Barista at HomeBest events and festivals in Florida in April 2024.
We aim to build an authentic community of home baristas who are passionate about their morning coffee ritual. Whatever your brew method, french press or pour over, whether you need a kettle or filters, Barista Warrior has you covered. Shop now for great selection and prices. Shop now at www.baristawarrior.com or click the photo above.

 

Antique Tractor and Engine Show

April 4th through 6th White Springs

Stephen Foster Folk Center Tractor and Engine Show Best Events and Festivals in Florida April 2024Compete in the tractor pulls and watch demonstrations of shingle milling, corn grinding, home canning and more. Unusual engines for everyday purposes with exhibits and collections of flywheels, hit and miss engines, water pumps, vintage pedal tractors, antique cars, and farm equipment.

On Saturday morning, an antique tractor parade will feature everything from customized lawn tractors to restored farm machinery. Try your luck at our raffle prizes, shop and eat with our vendors.  We have tons of family fun activities and a kid’s area on Saturday!

 

$5 per vehicle up to 8 people included.

 

 

Old Florida Celebration of the Arts

April 6 and 7 Cedar Key

Old Florida Celebration of the Arts held in Cedar Key April 6 and 7. Established in 1964 and formerly known as the Cedar Key Sidewalk Arts Festival, the Old Florida Celebration of the Arts returned to a juried fine art fair format in 2006. Over the past 15 years, the festival’s reputation has grown and it is now recognized as one of the top Small-Town Art Fairs in the nation. Welcoming only 100 high-quality artists and about 15-18,000 visitors annually, the event radiates a relaxed and friendly atmosphere often missing in larger venues. 

The event is free.

 

6th Annual Sebring Soda Festival

April 6-7 Sebring

Sebring Soda Festival Best events and festivals in Florida in April 2024This niche event has gained local, state, and national media attention thanks to its unique concept and the local Soda Shop that sparked the idea. It’s no wonder people flock to the festival each year to enjoy two days of old-fashioned fun in historic downtown Sebring.

Indulge in a wide array of traditional and unique sodas, including flavors like caramel apple, prickly pear, espresso, and candied bacon. Discover vintage favorites like Cheerwine, Moxie, and RC Cola, along with small-batch creations made with real sugar or honey from renowned companies across the US.

Festival admission is free. Soda tasting punch cards of varying value will be available for purchase on the website. This is a leashed dog friendly event!

 

St. Augustine Poetfest

April 11-13 St. Augustine

For the third year in a row, Flagler College, Ancient City Poets, and the St. Johns Cultural Council present a three-day poetry festival to celebrate literary heritage and to connect the creative community.

St. Augustine PoetFest 2024 takes place throughout the city at various cultural venues and includes events ranging from poetry readings to improv showcases.

All Poetfest 2024 events are free and open to the public. Click the link for details on locations, dates, and times.

Poetry magazine. Click the link for information and to subscribe.
Poetry magazine has been a monthly gathering space for poets and readers for over a century. Based in Chicago since 1912, the magazine publishes contemporary work primarily in English and translation of poets from all over the United States and the world


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Tampa Bay Blues Festival

April 12-14 St. Petersburg

America’s finest waterfront blues festival, with great food vendors, full liquor bars, craft beers and wines. Please order tickets and VIP passes now for three great days of blues by the bay!

Single day, general admission tickets start at $70. Packages are available.

 

Delray Affair

April 12th through 14th Delray Beach

62nd annual Delray Affair April 12-14 Best events and festivals in Florida April 2024This isn’t just an ordinary art event—it’s an immersive experience that invites you to explore the extraordinary. Lose yourself in the diverse range of artistic expressions, from mesmerizing paintings to intricate sculptures, captivating photography, and beyond. Each step unveils a new discovery, a new opportunity to connect with the artists and their captivating stories.

As you stroll through the Delray Affair, you’ll be captivated by the infectious energy that permeates the air. Feel the pulse of creativity as the streets come alive with live demonstrations, engaging workshops, and interactive experiences that invite you to unleash your own artistic spirit.

The event is free but there may be charges to park in certain locations.

 

 

 

Pinellas Pepper Festival April 13 and 14 in Pinellas ParkPinellas Pepper Fest                                            April 13 and 14 Pinellas Park

Featuring all things related to spicy foods. Enjoy sauces, bbq, spices, peppers, and delicious food everywhere. Spicy music, food trucks, and more. This is a pet and family friendly event.

Admission is free.

 

Habanero Bacon Salsa from Traverse Bay Farms. Click for information and to order.
If you like hot/spicy foods, try this habanero-bacon-salsa from Traverse Bay Farms in Michigan. Try it on all your favorites including nachos, burgers, potatoes, and more. CLICK HERE or the photo for details and to order. Mix and match 8 products for free shipping.

 

Sharks Tooth Festival

April 13 and 14 Venice

Venice Florida Sharks Tooth Festival April 13 and 14, 2024This unique events has something for everyone. Vendors, music, food, adult beverages, educational speakers, the Manasota Fossil Club. a kids zone, and more.

Venice is billed as the shark tooth capital of the world. This event looks like it is going to be huge. Review the website for all the activities and vendors.

This event is free to attend. Some parking facilities may have a charge. Free parking is available and a trolley service will be operating in the downtown area.

 

 

 

Florida Aquarium tickets. Click the image for details and to purchase.
You’ve seen the sharks teeth, now see real sharks. Get close to many of Florida’s aquatic and terrestrial animals and ecosystems, as well as others from around the world at the Florida Aquarium, including sea turtles and coral. Your ticket allows you to access all of the exhibits, which feature diverse creatures and habitats. Click the image or THIS LINK for details and to purchase tickets.

 

 

New Smyrna Beach Food Festival April 18, 2024 Best Events and Festivals in Florida April 2024New Smyrna Beach Food Festival                                    April 18 New Smyrna Beach

The New Smyrna Beach Food Festival is from 5-9 p.m., Thursday, April 18th 2024, along Flagler Avenue. Multiple eateries may sample taste-sized portions of Volusia County restaurants’ best dishes priced from $5 to $8. Enjoy live entertainment along the Avenue, shopping with the Merchants on Flagler Avenue and various vendors who sell their handmade items! Restaurants will be competing for the “Best on the Beach” award this year

 

 

Miami-Dade Countryfest

April 20-21 Miami

Miami-Dade Countryfest April 20-21, 2024 Best Events and Festivals in Florida April 2024The Miami-Dade CountryFest, formerly known as the Miami Agriculture, Horse and Cattle Show, has been a staple event since 2015. This FREE annual festival offers a weekend of entertainment for all ages and attracts cattle enthusiasts from around the globe.

Experience two days of non-stop fun with rodeos, vendors, live music, food trucks, kids zones, and other enjoyable activities. This year’s event will feature a thrilling professional rodeo show, adding to the excitement. Although the festival has a new name, it still retains many of its beloved traditions, making it an event you don’t want to miss.

General admission is free. Bleacher and VIP seating options are available for purchase.

 

Pompano Beach Seafood Festival

April 20-21 Pompano Beach

The Festival, a non profit event, was founded in 1984 by the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce and the Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo to support local charities in the Pompano Beach Area.  Featuring some of the greatest musicians and artists in South Florida, the annual event has become a staple in the community. The proceeds of the annual festival stay in the community benefiting 12 great local charities.

Featuring seafood and other foods, more than 100 vendor booths, and music.

This event is looks to be geared more toward adults with tickets running $15 per day or a two day ticket of $20. Kids under 12 are admitted free. Only 1 sealed bottle of water may brought into the event. No outside drinks, coolers, or large bags. As you would guess no dogs allowed. The wording on their website isn’t very friendly about these demands either.

 

Pensacola Crawfish Festival

April 26-28 Pensacola

The Pensacola Crawfish  Festival features thousands of pounds of boiled crawfish, fresh from Louisiana, brought to you by Pensacola locals, Cordova Crawfish Company. Cajun fare features include: boudin, jambalaya, etouffee, fresh and fried seafood, gumbo, and much more!

Plenty of seafood, non-seafood, music, and vendors will be on hand. Budweiser and Coca-Cola products will be available for purchase.

Adult admission is $5, kids ages 6-12 are $2, under 6 admitted free.

 

Floridiana Fest

April 27 Gulfport

The Floridania Fest is the ultimate marketplace for vintage Florida souvenirs, cool kitsch, advertising, art and ephemera. No matter what your vintage Florida interest is, you’ll probably find it at this show! All the leading dealers of vintage Florida items will be there, plus several leading Florida authors.

Admission is $5. Children under 14, free.

If the Floridiana Fest is of interest to you, you might consider reading my review of the book Florida Roadside Attractions History. This is a step back to the days when the landscape wasn’t dotted with Disney, Universal, and massive cookie cutter housing developments.

 

Sweet Corn Fiesta in West Palm Beach, FL April 28, 2024 Best events and festivals in Florida April 2024Sweet Corn Fiesta                                              April 28 West Palm Beach

Enjoy delicious sweet corn, foods, games, craft and other vendors, contests including corn eating and corn shucking, and more. This event has been called the kid friendliest event of the year.

Admission is $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 6-12, under 6 are free.

 

 

To conclude, I want to thank you for reading my listing of the best events and festivals in Florida in April 2024. Check back every month otherwise you might miss out on a great event you did not know about. If you are sponsoring or hosting an upcoming event, drop me a line so I can include it. Maybe we can work together on a blog post and social media posts to promote the event. Let’s hear your ideas.

 

 

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Turnbull Grand Canal Florida Historic Marker

Turnbull Grand Canal Florida Historic Marker

New Smyrna Beach is where you will find the Turnbull Grand Canal Florida Historic Marker. The City of New Smyrna Beach and the Florida Department of State are the marker sponsors. In  2018 sponsors placed the monument for public viewing.

If you would like to read other posts on my blog about Florida historic markers, please CLICK HERE.

The National Register of Historic Places includes the Turnbull Canal System. You may see the National Park Service NRHP file using THIS LINK.

To learn more about the Turnbull Settlement, please visit the New Smyrna Museum of History.

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Turnbull Grand Canal Florida Historic Marker

 

TEXT

The Turnbull Grand Canal, also known as the Grand Canal, was built by indentured servants brought to the area by Scottish physician Dr. Andrew Turnbull in 1768. As part of the largest single attempt at British colonization in North America, Smyrnea Settlement, Turnbull attracted more than 1,400 Minorcans, Corsicans, Greeks, and Italians, who sought the promise of new opportunities in Florida. Turnbull was impressed by the Egyptian canal system and wanted to replicate it in Smyrnea. Three canals ran east-west and were linked with a fourth longer canal known as the Grand Canal that ran north-south and connected to Turnbull Bay. These hand-dug canals provided irrigation and drainage for rice, hemp, cotton, and indigo crops, and served as a mode of transportation within the colony. After nine years of harsh treatment under Turnbull, drought, and crop failures, the colony’s population fell to about 600 people. In 1777 a group of Smyrnea colonists walked 70 miles to St. Augustine to petition British East Florida Governor Patrick Tonyn for release from their indentures. After hearing the case, Governor Tonyn gave them their freedom and granted them land north of St. Augustine.

F-1025

A Florida Heritage Site

Sponsored by the City of New Smyrna Beach, the Historic New Smyrna Beach Preservation Commission, Mayor James Hathaway, Vice Mayor Jason McGuirk, Commissioner Judy Reiker, Commissioner Jake Sachs, Commissioner Randy Hartman, and the Florida Department of State.

2018

Turnbull Grand Canal Florida Historic Marker is located at the corner of SR 44 and Walker Drive in New Smyrna Beach. It is located across Walker Drive from Auto Zone.
The Turnbull Grand Canal marker is located at the corner of SR 44 and Walker Drive in New Smyrna Beach. It is on the south side of SR 44 across Walker from Auto Zone.

Turnbull Grand Canal looking southTurnbull Grand Canal looking north with SR 44 showing. Turnbull Grand Canal

 

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The Best Events and Festivals in Florida in February 2024

The Best Events and Festivals in Florida

Are you searching for the best events and festivals in Florida in February 2024? Thanks for visiting. Please use the links below to find fun events for all ages.

Florida hosts some amazing events and festivals. Each month I hope to take a look at a dozen or so of these in hopes of bringing you fun, exciting, and unexpected ways to enjoy our state.

If you have an event or know of one coming up that you feel should be highlighted, please drop me a line with as much information as you can, including a website. I’ll be glad to include your suggestions in future posts.

I have listed events in date order.

Best Events and Festivals in Florida February 2024 Everglades Seafood Festival54th Annual Everglades Seafood Festival

February 2-4, 2024 in Everglades City

Enjoy three days of live country music, carnival rides, arts, crafts, and tantalizing seafood, right here in the Stone Crab Capital of the World.

 

 

 

Everglades National Park Airboat Tour and Wildlife Show
Discover the Everglades National Park, a diverse landscape providing crucial habitats for numerous rare and endangered species. Take an airboat ride, and view alligators, turtles, and even the elusive Florida panther. Click the photo or HERE for more information and to reserve your tickets for this amazing adventure in the wilds of the Florida Everglades.

49th Annual Mount Dora Arts Festival49th Annual Mount Dora Arts Festival The Best Events and Festivals in Florida in February 2024

February 3 and 4, 2024 in downtown Mount Dora

Experience 300 fine artists lined along the streets to showcase a vast array of incredible talent in this juried event. There will be entertainment, beer, wine, cocktails, music and festival food to round out the amazing weekend. The event runs 9am-5pm on Saturday and 9am-4pm on Sunday and is FREE to attend.

While you are deciding whether to addend, I recommend you watch this video from the 2023 festival to see what is in store for you.

 

 

Mount Dora Images of America book
Visitors flock to Mount Dora, not only for the tranquil setting, but also for the community’s old-fashioned charm, antique district, and architectural distinctiveness. Enjoy dozens of historic images in this book, part of the Images of America series from Arcadia Publishing. Click the photo to order your copy today!

Florida State Fair

February 8-19, 2024 in Tampa

Everything you would ever want in a fair: food, entertainment, rides, exhibits, and more.

Free parking is provided while admission and ride charges are separate. Check online for pricing. Pets are not permitted.

 

Florida Aquarium tickets. Click the image for details and to purchase.
Get close to many of Florida’s aquatic and terrestrial animals and ecosystems, as well as others from around the world at the Florida Aquarium in Tampa, including sea turtles and coral. Your ticket allows you to access all of the exhibits, which feature diverse creatures and habitats. Click the image or THIS LINK for details and to purchase tickets.

 

 

Cuda Bowl Barracuda Tournament

February 8-10, 2024 in Sugar Loaf Key

The toothy barracuda are prey for competitors in this annual challenge. This is an all-release flats tournament. The name of the tournament is because it is scheduled each year just before the Super Bowl NFL football championship. The event is headquartered at South of the Seven Restaurant on Sugarloaf Key, mile marker 17. The top angler and guide in spin and fly divisions receive prizes. Recognition is given to the top scoring female and junior anglers.

 

Love Your Shorts Film Festival in Sanford The Best Events and Festivals in Florida in February 2024Love Your Shorts Film Festival

February 15-18 in Sanford

The Love Your Shorts Film Festival is an annual showcase in Sanford, Florida, of short films from around Florida, the United States and the world. During the festival, film fans can view films up to 30 minutes each in a variety of categories and attend film workshops.

Click the link or image for details and to purchase tickets.

Gasparilla Music Festival

February 16-18 in Tampa

For music lovers, this is one of the best events and festivals in Florida in February 2024. The 2024 Gasparilla Music Festival takes place in Julian B Lane Riverfront Park on Feb 16-18, featuring musical acts from a wide variety of genres on several stages and cuisine from the region’s top restaurants. You will without doubt have an amazing time. The organization is involved throughout the year in several initiatives including providing scholarships and instruments to music students.

Gasparilla Music Festival The Best in Events and Festivals in Florida in February 2024

 

 

Steinhatchee Fiddler Crab Festival 202416th Annual Fiddler Crab Festival

February 16-18 in Steinhatchee

Live music, car and truck show, craft vendors, fishing tournament, a parade, food vendors, beer and wine garden, poker run, and finally, cap off the excitement with an incredible fireworks display. Fun for the entire family, this event is unlike any you have attended before.

 

 

 

 

60th Coconut Grove Arts Festival

February 17-19, 2024 in Coconut Grove

For 60 years, the mission of the Coconut Grove Arts & Historical Association has been to nurture a future generation of artists. Proceeds from the Coconut Grove Arts Festival help to fund our year-round programs, create a positive impact on our community and touch the lives of many throughout the year.

31st Annual Black Heritage Festival New Smyrna Beach31st Annual Black Heritage Festival

February 24 at Pettis Park in New Smyrna Beach.

Enjoy singing, dancing, historical demonstrations, food, and much more. This is a signature event every year in New Smyrna Beach produced by the Mary S. Harrell Black Heritage Museum.

Art and Seafood on the Waterfront

February 24 and 25 in Safety Harbor

Featured events include juried fine art, fish taco competition, delicious local seafood, interactive art activities, kids zone, entertainment for all ages and a full music stage.

General admission to the event is FREE! VIP tickets are available for purchase.

Key West 13 stop hop on hop off trolley tour. Click to book tickets.
This tour covers the entire city. You can avoid the trouble of driving and parking in a new place. You can hop-on and off the trolley and explore the city on your own, at any of the 13 stops. Your ticket is valid for all day, so you can tour at your own speed. Click the photo above or HERE for more information and to reserve your tickets.

 

 

 

Key West Art & Craft Festival February 24 and 25, 2024 The Best Events and Festivals in Florida February 2024

59th Annual Key West Art & Craft Festival

February 24 and 25, 2024 in Key West

The Key West Craft Show and The Old Island Days Art Festival are now combined as the The Key West Art and Craft Festival. The event dates are February 24th & 25th, 2024.  Old Town at The Truman Waterfront Park is home to the combined show.

This promises to be a tremendous show for artists and crafters. Seek out your new, favorite artisan and then support their efforts while in beautiful Key West.

 

LaBelle Swamp Cabbage Festival 202458th Annual Swamp Cabbage Festival

February 24 and 25, 2024 in LaBelle

Car show, parade, Swamp Cabbage Queen and Princess, musical entertainment, a rodeo, bass fishing tournament, artisans, and plenty of food including swamp cabbage. The Swamp Cabbage Festival is undeniably fun for the entire family.

 

To conclude, I want to thank you for reading my listing of the best events and festivals in Florida in February 2024. Check back every month otherwise you might miss out on a great event you did not know about.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

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Walking around the Best Events and Festivals in Florida in February 2024 requires the proper footwear. Orthofeet will provide you with comfort, protection, and fashion. If you have foot problems, Orthofeet is a great place to start looking for relief. Click the link or image for all their options. Be sure to look for the savings offer.

 

County of Volusia Art in Public Places

Art in Public Places Cool by artist Dan Gunderson

The County of Volusia Art in Public Places program will be the topic of my discussion at the New Smyrna Beach Public Library in January. Subjects will include defining art in public places, locations to find county owned art, how the program operates, and more. You can find incredible artwork throughout our county.

Learn more about this county initiative by using THIS LINK. From courthouses, to libraries, to the Ocean Center, to the Daytona Beach International Airport, art is a critical component of publicly owned and accessible buildings. While often times these pieces go unnoticed, art is crucial to setting the tone for buildings and their intended use.

We will also briefly discuss other Art in Public Places locations and programs in Volusia County. From sculpture walks to sharks, Volusia County cities and museums offer a wide array of art for the public to enjoy, free for the viewing.

Art in Public Places programs are available throughout the county. Often times, they are right before us and we don’t even realize it. You can find an example of public art in Thomson, Georgia. Their public art exhibit titled 12 String Strut, honors local blues legend Blind Willie McTell.

This event is free to the public and will take place on Thursday, January 25, 2024, at 10a.m. If you are in town for the IMAGES: A Festival of the Arts show, we invite you to attend. You will learn a bit more about the art that you will find throughout Volusia County.

Civil Rights in Florida New Smyrna Museum of History

Civil Rights in Florida published by Arcadia Publishing

Civil Rights in Florida published by Arcadia PublishingJoin me at the New Smyrna Museum of History on Thursday, February 8, 2024, at either 4:30p or 6:30p for a discussion of my newest book, Civil Rights in Florida. Admission to the museum and talk are free for members, or $8 for future members.

Published in November 2023 by Arcadia Publishing, this book covers woman’s suffrage, the Tallahassee Bus Boycott, Jackie Robinson, St. Augustine in 1964, and women’s rights pioneer Roxcy O’Neal Bolton.

Learn about how Major League Baseball honors Jackie Robinson each year at this post on my blog.

This post may contain affiliate links including links to Amazon. 

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Gabordy Canal Historic Marker New Smyrna Beach Florida

Placement of the Gabordy Canal marker, adjacent to Riverside Drive

Gabordy Canal

The Gabordy Canal Historic Marker is located where the cities of New Smyrna Beach and                                            Edgewater come together. The name of this canal is often spelled in differing ways. I have                                         seen alternative spellings of Gabardy, Garbordy, and Garbardy.

The Gabordy Canal marks the dividing line between the city of New Smyrna
Beach, to the north, and Edgewater, to the south.

This marker is located on the eastern side of the road, near the corner of Riverside
Drive (north and south) and Hamilton Road (west). Private property surrounds the area                                                and the marker is located close to the busy south Riverside Drive.
There is really no parking right at the marker (don’t park in people’s yards). There
is a sidewalk located on the eastern side of Riverside Drive. See the image below to note
just how close this marker is to the road.

Placement of the Gabordy Canal marker, adjacent to Riverside Drive
The Gabordy Canal historic marker, sits adjacent to the busy Riverside Drive.

 

Problems

This marker, while important, has multiple problems in its text.

The marker itself does not talk much about the canal system. The marker also uses
the terms “colonization” and colonist” when the more accurate terms are
“settlement” and “settler” (as in the Turnbull, or Smyrnea, Settlement). The use of
terminology related to the word colony implies Florida could have been associated
with the original thirteen colonies we have learned about since grade school.

The marker references the number of over 1,400 persons being “attracted” to the area.
While there is some truth to this number, it being the number who originally left
Europe, less than 1,300 appear to have survived the journey. Archaeologists Dr.
Roger Grange and Dorothy Moore have put forth the number of 1,255 who
survived the voyage across the Atlantic. As to whether those owing indenture to                                              Andrew Turnbull and his partners were “attracted” to the area, I think history                                                     showed that is highly debatable.

Finally, though the marker text states that Governor (James) Grant granted release
to the settlers from their indenture, it was Governor Patrick Tonyn, (who served as
governor of East Florida from 1774-1783) a confirmed enemy of Turnbull, who
did such. (See Grange and Moore p. 25, linked below)

For more information on the Smyrnea Settlement, I recommend reading a booklet
written by Dr. Grange and Ms. Moore and published by the New Smyrna Museum
of History. In addition to clicking the link provided above, you may pick up a free copy at the museum.

I also recommend reviewing the University of North Florida, Florida History Online site for letters and papers related to the Smyrnea Settlement.

 

Marker Text

The Gabordy Canal

Gabordy Canal Historic Marker New Smyrna Beach, Florida
The State of Florida historic marker, located at the divide between New Smyrna Beach and Edgewater, FL

The Gabordy Canal, also known as the South Canal, was built by colonists brought to the New Smyrna area in 1768 by the Scottish physician, Dr. Andrew Turnbull. As part of the largest single attempt at British colonization, New Smyrna attracted more than 1,400 Minorcans, Corsicans, Greeks, and Italians who sought new opportunities as indentured servants. Turnbull, impressed by the Egyptian canal system, wanted to replicate it in New Smyrna. Three canals, including this one, ran east-west and were linked with a fourth, longer canal that ran north-south. These hand dug canals provided irrigation and drainage  or rice, hemp, cotton, and indigo crops grown by the colonists and served as a mode of transportation withing the colony. Local historians believe that the Gabordy Canal was named after the Gabardis, an original colonist family who lived in the vicinity of the canal. After nine years of harsh treatment, drought, and crop failures, the population was reduced to about 600 people. A group of colonists petitioned English Governor James Grant of St. Augustine in 1777 for release from their indenture. The governor granted land north of St. Augustine to these colonists.

A Florida Heritage Site

Sponsored by the City of New Smyrna Beach, the Historic New Smyrna Beach
Preservation Commission, Mayor James Hathaway, Vice Mayor Judy Reiker,
Commissioner Jake Sachs, Commissioner Jason McGuirk, Commissioner Kirk
Jones, and the Florida Department of State.

F-924
2016

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a
purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect
any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are
never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

Menorca: Book your guided tour of Mahon including boat trip
Click the photo above or THIS LINK to book your Menorcan guided tour of Mahon. Discover the southern tip of Menorca on a guided day trip. After pickup at your hotel, enjoy a 1-hour glass-bottom boat trip around Mahon Harbor, one of the deepest natural harbors in the world. Next, head into Mahon city center. Explore the capital’s historic center with official guida and enjoy some free time for shopping. Continue to Punta Prima Beach and enjoy some free time for sunbathing or lunch (at your own expense.) Finally, visit the fishermens’ village of Binibeca. Wander its streets to admire the white-painted houses and picturesque streets. You will be dropped off at your hotel at the end of the day.

 

 

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Why Public History: An Example

Connor Library Building New Smyrna Beach

Why Public History? An Example.

People occasionally me my interests and what drives them. As you know, I use the moniker, Robert Redd Historian. It’s on my website, my Facebook page, my Twitter, my Instagram, my Pinterest, and my YouTube. OK, enough self-promotion there. Seriously, please click the links and feel free to give me a follow. I am generous in following back if the sites let me know you are there. The inevitable follow up is why public history. They want an example. Well, here you go, Why Public History: An example.

So, some of you may know I have a B.A. in American Studies and an M.A. in Public History. Just what is public history? That’s a fair question.

From the National Council on Public History, we get this definition; “public history describes the many and diverse ways in which history is put to work in the world.  In this sense, it is history that is applied to real-world issues.”

Just who “does” public history? Again, a fair question and we’ll again turn to NCPH, “They call themselves historical consultants, museum professionals, government historians, archivists, oral historians, cultural resource managers, curators, film and media producers, historical interpreters, historic preservationists, policy advisers, local historians, and community activists, among many many other job descriptions.  All share an interest and commitment to making history relevant and useful in the public sphere.”

Finally, how is public history used? Back to our friends at NCPH, “Although public historians can sometimes be teachers, public history is usually defined as history beyond the walls of the traditional classroom.  It can include the myriad ways that history is consumed by the general public.”

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So, we have a decent enough, but maybe not perfect, definition of public history. If I had to go back and choose from these quotes, I would make note of the last sentence, “…the myriad ways that history is consumed by the general public.”

Ultimately, as a public historian there are several key ingredients you must possess. The first is the field and study of history. The commitment to honesty, telling a full, complete, and unbiased story. While you may go into a story thinking you already know the outcome, that is often not the case. The public historian has to be willing to change their preconceived notions on a subject if the evidence leads them in that direction. This can make people, including sponsors, uncomfortable. As the American Historical Association states “Historians should practice their craft with integrity. They should honor the historical record. They should document their sources. They should acknowledge their debts to the work of other scholars. ”

A second important trait is the ability to understand your target audience. You must be able to relate to people. You must be able to talk AND listen. You must be able to work collaboratively. Even if your project is solo (or so you think), others are going to have input. If you are creating interpretive panels others are going to need to see them and provide input before the file is sent to production. If you are writing reports, editors will have input. If you are doing consulting work, those who hired you will want to review your work before it is released. You get the idea.

Finally, you need to be able to write in a manner that will make the public want to read what you are trying to get across. I love my academic friends, but often in reading a university press title, it is obvious it was written for an academic market with little consideration of public consumption. It’s too bad because the years of research that go into these books should be shared. OK, another fault with university press titles  is that they can also be priced through the roof but that’s not the author’s fault.

If you have been to a national park and seen the panels there, or a battlefield with text panels near artillery you have seen what is most likely excellent public history. State and local parks often have excellent panels. Some parks will have booklets available for purchase at a nominal cost. These are often the work of staff historians, working with the public in mind.

Museums are another prime location for public history. Many museums are too text heavy for me, as the trend is often to move away from showing the real artifacts and instead “teach” visitors about subjects. Too often, these are exhibits that are full of long panels that do not take into consideration interest levels, attention spans, and time constraints of visitors.

Museums often are accused of being “revisionist,” whatever that might mean. I suppose if correcting false or incomplete narratives of the past makes one a “revisionist,” most public historians, when doing their job correctly, can proudly wear that label.

Online exhibits are becoming an excellent option and the public historian must know how to engage viewers quickly to keep them from clicking away. This takes skills in writing, technology, visual layout, and of course teamwork because there will be multiple experts working on such projects.

Connor Library Building New Smyrna BeachWhy Public History: An Example
The former Connor Library Building located in Old Fort Park in New Smyrna Beach, FL

 

Close up of the sign outside the old Connor Library Building New Smyrna BeachWhy Public History: An Example
When asked “why public history” Here’s an example. This close up of the sign outside the Economic Development offices (the Old Connor Library Building) located in Old Fort Park in New Smyrna Beach, FL gives us plenty to discuss.

 

SO, the real reason for this post, WHY PUBLIC HISTORY: An Example, can be found in this building photo and the accompanying detailed photo. This seems like a pretty innocent image of an old building, with a small sign in front telling those passing by what the building is. It is now home to the Economic Development department of the City of New Smyrna Beach.

This sign could not have been written by a public historian. There are multiple problems with it that we shall examine.

The first issue for me is the mixed message I get as a viewer. We have the current use (got to get those logos in don’t we). The colors don’t match, the font doesn’t match, and there doesn’t seem to have a reason for having these differences.

The fact that this is two separate signs makes the hanging sign, with the rust stain running down it, look like an afterthought at best. Then there’s whatever garbage is on the ground in front of the sign, but I can forgive that. A good city employee will pick that up as soon as they see it.

So, the first thing we need are two separate signs in my opinion. Personally, I would not even have two signs. The original sign, stating the current use of the building is fine. For any information about the prior use of the building, I would create an interpretive panel (some of you might call it a sign and that’s OK). These panels can get a bit pricey and can not be printed by local sign manufacturers, if you do it correctly. These panels will need the work of a historian, a graphic designer, an editor, and cooperation with a producer such as iZone Imaging.

My second issue with this hanging sign is the overall wording that has been used. “Former location of the N.S.B. free library 1901-1941.”

Where to begin here. I guess first is that there is no reason to underline the word former. You have already told people what offices are now in the building. Nobody believes it is the current New Smyrna Beach library.

My second issue with the wording is the abbreviating of the city name to N.S.B. Just spell it out. Yes, we all know what it means, but would it have really cost that much more to spell out your own city name? And how about a comma after the word library?

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Finally, the use of the term “free library” has caused problems. How do I know? I have had visitors to the city personally tell me that an employee in the building told them the library was created specifically for freed slaves living in the area. Oh, my. If I had only been told the story once, I wouldn’t think much of it. More than once, by different people on different occasions is problematic. Where that story originated is beyond me but I have to attribute it, at least partly, to the language on the sign. Fortunately, that employee is no longer in the building but how many people, locals and visitors, did she tell that story to.

My final problem is that the sign is just badly written and leaves out, well, the entire story. Yes, this building is the home of the former library. The operating dates are accurate based upon what is known. The problem is, this building was moved to its current location in 1991. The wording of the sign strongly implies that the building has always been located in Old Fort Park.

While I do not know when this hanging sign was installed, if was after 2015, a very cursory review of my book, Historic Sites and Locations of New Smyrna Beach, would have helped tremendously and pointed the creator to source material. I would have gladly helped whoever was creating the sign. Even if the sign was installed prior, very limited research would have helped create a more accurate, and interesting, story.


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What is the sign leaving out you might ask.

The founders of the library, Washington and Jeanette Connor are never referenced. Who were they and what was their connection to New Smyrna (it wasn’t New Smyrna Beach at the time.) How did the prior toll bridge tie into the story? How did the city gain ownership of the building? Where was the library located prior to its move? Why was it moved at all? What remodeling and renovation work has been done to the building? Who else has had use of the building since it was moved?

So as we can see, the use of a public historian to create a better interpretive panel, or panels, for this century plus year old building could have answered many  questions that visitors and locals might have. This area is a busy one, especially during Saturday farmers markets and during the large number of downtown events and festivals the city holds. A proper panel, or series of panels, would supply to readers an accurate and more complete version of events.

For a town that attempts to pride itself on its history, this is an issue that should be addressed. City of New Smyrna Beach, I am easy to find!

Thank you for taking the time to read my ramblings on the importance of proper public history. I think you can now better understand the question of Why Public History based upon this example. What examples of incomplete or bad public history have you encountered? Share your Why Public History: An Example experiences with other readers.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

New Smyrna Beach paddleboad. Click the link for information and to purchase tickets for an incredible day on the river. Why public history: an example blog post.
CLICK HERE or the photo above for more information and to book your incredible paddle board or kayak tour. New Smyrna’s waterways with a stand-up paddle board or kayak tour. See Florida’s wildlife, learn how to paddle board or kayak, and stop at islands as you paddle.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Begin your tour with a quick paddle board demonstration onshore and in the water. If you’re not sure about paddle boarding, just hop into a kayak. Once you’re ready, head out into nature. Paddle through the calm waterways and keep an eye out for live conch, pelicans, and crabs.  See dolphins, manatees, and sea turtles as you paddle past picturesque islands and through mangroves.

 

 

 

 

 

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Volusia County History: A Bibliography with links

Allen Hall, Stetson University

Volusia County History A Bibliography with Links

Volusia County is located on the east coast of Florida and is home to more than 550,000 residents and growing daily. The county is currently a prime retirement area for transplants. Read further to discover my Volusia County History bibliography with links. It will help guide you to relevant source material, much of it easily obtainable.

County management is handled by an elected County Council consisting of two at-large members and five district elected members. The Chair position is one of the at-large members.

In 2021, nearly ten million visitors came to Volusia County. Many came to enjoy the “World’s Most Famous Beach,” while others arrived for NASCAR and other racing events, while Bike Week and Biketoberfest continue to draw strong crowds. Events such as the November Turkey Run, spring break, and the multi-day Welcome To Rockville concerts bring short-term visitors to the county. The Ocean Center draws sporting events, conventions, and the occasional concert which help put “heads in beds.”

While tourism is a main draw, the county has a wide and varied history consisting of colorful characters and events. This bibliography is my attempt to bring together a listing of material for readers related to Volusia County history. The term “history” is open to interpretation. I will try to be lenient in my use of the term.

I am providing links when I can so that you can purchase, or if possible, download or read online, for yourself. Materials may be available through the Volusia County Library system. Please check there. Even if it is not in your local branch, books can be sent to your preferred branch. Some books may be non-circulating such as those in genealogy collections and you will need to visit a particular location.

A couple of things about this bibliography. It is not meant to be all inclusive. This is an ongoing project and I invite your input with works I have not included. Also, new material is being published consistently. I try to keep up but this is a one person operation. Updates will be made to the list as required.

I will not be linking items such as newspaper articles. Mainstream magazine articles are fair game if they appear to have value. Peer reviewed academic journal articles will be included though availability of these may be quite limited. There have been, and continue to be, many local, “freebie,” magazine and entertainment guides. Keeping up with them is nearly impossible and finding older issues is the same. Unless something truly strikes me, I am avoiding these.

I am not including links to social media pages. Most of these pages/groups are not very good and the egalitarian nature of social media means anybody with a keyboard can make a statement and way too many take them as fact. Rather than be accused of playing favorites, I am avoiding these pages altogether.

Websites and blogs that show good solid research and writing will be included. Many good historians/writers are sharing their work in these formats. YouTube channels? Maybe.

Works of fiction are not generally included in this bibliography.

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I have chosen to set this listing up by city and a general county history section. My thought is that if you are looking for materials on Oak Hill you can find that heading rather than reviewing the entire list.

At the end of the list, you will find a listings of Volusia County based historical societies and museums. Be sure to reach out to these organizations if you have specific questions. There is also a section titled “people.” This is for those individuals who have made an impact on Volusia County for the better or the worse.

I make no guarantees as to the historical accuracy of the materials listed. I have not read and do not own copies of all of the sources lists. While I can certainly vouch for research standards many of the listed authors use, I recommend you draw your own conclusions. Works with foot/end notes and bibliographies are probably more reliable than those without. Notes and bibliographies allow readers to follow up on sources and verify statements.

I want this listing to be a joint project with you, the reader. If you know of sources I have not listed, please drop me a line or add a comment. Please provide as much information as possible and links if the material is digital. I will update the list with your suggestions.

I invite you to provide your thoughts on the resources listed below. If you feel a book or article is a must read, please let readers know and why you feel this way. If you think something is poor, that is acceptable. Please make sure your remarks are respectful and explain your reasoning. Is the research bad? Why do you think a work is not good? Personal attacks on authors or subject matter will not be approved for posting.

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General County Histories

Dreggors, William J. and John Stephen Hess. A Century of West Volusia County 1860-1960. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Society, 1993.

Dreggors, William J., and John Stephen Hess. A Pictorial History of West Volusia County 1870-1940. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Society, 1989.

Fitzgerald, T.E. Volusia County Past and Present. Daytona Beach: The Observer Press, 1937.

Francke, Arthur E. Jr., Alyce Hockaday Gillingham, and Maxine Carey Turner. Volusia The West Side. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Society, 1986.

French, Larry. Grand Hotels of West Volusia County (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2018.

Friend, Lani. “Volusia and Vibilia: Companion Plantations on the St. Johns River in Spanish and Territorial East Florida,” Florida Historical Quarterly. Volume 97,  No. 4 (2019): 379-406.

Gaby, Donald C. “Volusia; The Origin of a Name.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 76, No. 1.

Gold, Daniel Pleasant. History of Volusia County Florida. DeLand: E.O. Painter Printing Co., 1927.

Hebel, Ianthe Bond. Centennial History of Volusia County, Florida, 1854-1954. DeLand: Volusia County Historical Commission, 1955.

Langlotz, Patricia Callan. The Odyssey of an American School System: Volusia County Schools 1854-2000DeLand: Volusia County Schools, 2000.

Minshew, Paul and Jack Towle. “The 1998 Wildfires in Central Florida: Volusia County’s Own Armageddon.” Journal of Environmental Health. Vol. 61, No. 7 (1999): p. 22-26.

Schene, Michael G. Hopes, Dreams & Promises: A History of Volusia County, Florida. Daytona Beach: News-Journal Corporation, 1976.

Williamson, Ronald. Volusia County’s West Side: Steamboats & Sandhills (American Chronicles). Charleston: History Press, 2008.

Barberville

Brotemarkle, Benjamin D. Barberville (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2005.

Cassadaga

Guthrie, John J. Jr., Phillip Charles Lucas, and Gary Monroe, editors. Cassadaga: The South’s Oldest Spiritualist Community. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2000.

Guthrie, John J. Jr., “Seeking the Sweet Spirit of Harmony: Establishing a Spiritualist Community at Cassadaga, Florida, 1893-1933.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 77, No. 1.

Along the Beach Looking Toward Seabreeze Courtesy Florida MemoryVolusia County History Bibliography with links
Along the Beach Looking Toward Seabreeze
Courtesy Florida Memory

Daytona Beach

Atwell, Cheryl, and Vincent Clarida. Daytona Beach and the Halifax River Area (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 1998.

Cambre, Dale. Daytona Beach, Florida: A Postcard Tour (Postcard History Series). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 1998.

Cardwell, Harold D. Daytona Beach 100 Years of Racing (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing 2002.

Cardwell, Harold D. Historic Photos of Daytona Beach. Nashville: Turner Publishing Company, 2007.

Cardwll, Harold D., Sr., and Patricia D. Cardwell. Historic Daytona Beach (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2004.

Halifax Herald. This journal is published by the Halifax Historical Society and is a trove of information relating to the east side of Volusia County. Individual articles are not generally referenced in this listing. To the best of my knowledge there is no easy to use index for this journal.

Lamb, Chris. Blackout: The Untold Story of Jackie Robinson’s First Spring Training. Lincoln: Bison Books, 2006.

Lane, Mark. Legendary Locals of Daytona Beach. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2015.

Lempel, Leonard R. “The Mayor’s ‘Henchmen and Henchwomen, Both White and Colored,’ Edward H. Armstrong and the Politics of Race in Daytona Beach, 1900-1940.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 79, No. 3.

Light, Patti. Daytona Beach Lifeguards (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.

Punnett, Dick. Beach Racers: Daytona Before NASCAR. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2008.

Punnett, Dick, and Yvonne Punnett. Racing on the Rim: A History of the Annual Automobile Racing Tournaments Held on the Sands of the Ormond-Daytona Beach, Florida 1903-1910. Self Published, 1997.

Punnett, Dick, and Yvonne Punnett. Thrills, Chills and Spills: A Photographic History of Early Aviation on the World’s Most Bizarre Airport, Daytona Beach, Florida, 1906-1929. Self Published, 1990.

Smith, Dusty. Haunted Daytona Beach (Haunted America). Charleston: History Press, 2007.

Snyder, Robert E. “Daytona Beach: A Closed Society.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 81, No. 2.

Spencer, Donald. Greetings from Daytona Beach.  Atglen: Schiffer Publishing, 2008.

Strickland, Alice. “Florida’s Golden Age of Racing.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 45 No. 3 (1967): 253-269.

 

Daytona Beach Dive Bar Tour
If you like to drink something a little stronger than beer, we’ve put something together that’s a little more edgy; The Daytona Beach Dive Bar Tour. We have a collection of bars that cater mostly to locals, bikers, and customers looking for something a little off the tourist path. If you think you’re ready for a locals-only bar, a biker bar, or just a seedy experience, then this is the tour for you. Click the link to purchase tickets and schedule your tour of some of Daytona Beach’s legendary bars. Bars you might go to include Uncle Waldo’s, Metz I and II, Drifters Route 1, and more. 

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DeBary

Brooks, Edith G. Saga of Frederick de Bary and de Bary Hall, Florida. Convention Press, 1968.

Allen Hall, Stetson University Courtesy Florida MemoryVolusia County History Bibliography with link
Allen Hall, Stetson University
Courtesy Florida Memory

DeLand

Blake, Jason. “The Integration of Stetson University.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 82, No. 4.

Caccamise, Louise Ball. Echoes of Yesterday: A History of the DeLand Area Public Library, 1912-1995. New Smyrna Beach: Luther’s Publishing Co.

Caccamise, Louise Ball. Memory Lane: A History of the Street Names of DeLand. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Society, 2013.

DeLand, Helen. Story of DeLand and Lake HelenNorwich: Louis W. Walden. 1928.

Hall, Maggi Smith, Michael Justin Holder, and West Volusia Historical Society. DeLand (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2003.

Hall, Maggi Smith. Stetson University (Campus History). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2005.

Johnston, Sidney. “The Historic Stetson University Campus in DeLand, 1884-1934” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 70, No. 3.

Lycan, Gilbert L. Stetson University: The First 100 Years. DeLand: Stetson University Press, 1983.

Roberts, L. Thomas, and West Volusia Historical Society. DeLand (Postcard History Series). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2014.

Smith, Dusty. Haunted DeLand and the Ghosts of West Volusia County (Haunted America). Charleston: History Press, 2008.

Stetson University Department of History

DeLeon Springs

Deltona

Edgewater

Sammons, Sandra Wallus, and Joanne Sikes. Edgewater (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2005.

Nomatic

Enterprise

Hartsfield, Stephen T. Under the Sheltering Tree: A Brief History of the Florida United Methodist Children’s Home, 1908-2008. N.P., N.D.

Holly Hill

Wiggins, Dean, and Adele Fredenberg. Gnomes of Holly Hill. Self Published, 2020.

Lake Helen

Schneider, Dorothy, and Ed L. Blackman. Lake Helen: The Gem of Florida The First 100 Years. Self Published, 2016.

New Smyrna Beach

Bockelman, Charles. Six Columns and Fort New Smyrna. DeLand: E.O. Painter Printing, Co., 1985.

Coe, Charles. Debunking the So Called Spanish Mission Near New Smyrna Beach. Washington D.C. 1941.

Cook-Wilson, Ethel. Isn’t That God’s Water? The Advent and Demise of Bethune-Volusia Beach Incorporated. Self Published, 2015.

Cumiskey, Kate. Surfing in New Smyrna Beach (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.

Detwiler, John Y. “Antiquities at and near New Smyrna, Florida.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 1, No. 3.

Doggett, Carita. Dr. Andrew Turnbull and the New Smyrna Colony of Florida. 

Grange, Roger and Dorothy Moore. Smyrnea Settlement: Archaeology & History of an 18th Century British Plantation in East Florida.  New Smyrna Beach: Southeast Volusia Historical Society, 2016.

Griffin, John W. and Robert H. Steinbach. Old Fort Park and Turnbull Canal System Archaeological Survey Project New Smyrna Beach, Florida. St. Augustine: Historic Property Associates, 1990.

Hudson, Fannie Minson. History of New Smyrna Black Businesses (with Present Area Businesses). Self Published, 2006.

Knighton, Annie Meeks. Bethune Beach Memoirs: A Pictorial History. Self published, 2014

Luther, Gary. History of New Smyrna: East Florida with Illustrations. New Smyrna Beach: Luther’s Publishing, 2009.

Panagopoulus, Epaminondes P. New Smyrna: An 18th Century Greek Odyssey. 1966.

Poertner, Bo. Old Town By the Sea: A Pictorial History of New Smyrna Beach. Overland Park: Walsworth Publishing. 2002.

Redd, Robert. Historic Sites and Landmarks of New Smyrna Beach. Charleston: History Press, 2015.

Redd, Robert. New Smyrna Beach (Postcard History). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2016.

Sheldon, Jane Murray. “Seminole Attacks Near New Smyrna, 1835-1856.” Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol. 8 No. 4 (1930): 188-196.

Sweett, Lawrence J. New Smyrna Beach (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2006.

Sweett, Zelia V. New Smyrna Beach (Then and Now.) Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2018.

Sweett, Zelia Wilson. New Smyrna, Florida in the Civil War. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Commission, 1963.

Daytona Beach Polynesian Luau
Marvel at a fascinating Polynesian performance in Daytona Beach. Immerse yourself in authentic island traditions without leaving the USA. Enjoy an enchanting luau, Hula dancing, and a fire knife show. Savor delicious Polynesian cuisine with a variety of dishes for dinner. Seize the chance to purchase photos, souvenirs, or premium drinks. Click the photo or THIS LINK for information and to purchase tickets.

 

Oak Hill

Dewees, Mary Redding. History and Memories of Oak Hill, Florida. Self Published, 1984.

Thompson, Dana. Oak Hill (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2009.

Orange City

Our Story of Orange City, Florida. Orange City: Village Improvement Association: Orange City Woman’s Club. 2020.

Hotel OrmondVolusia County History Bibliography with links
Hotel Ormond
Courtesy Florida Memory

Ormond Beach

Griffin, John W. “The Addison Blockhouse.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 30, No. 3.

Howell, Ronald L., and Alice R. Howell.  The Grand Hotel Ormond on the Halifax River, Ormond, Florida. Self Published.

Ormond Beach Historical Trust. Ormond Beach (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 1999.

Spencer, Donald. Greetings from Ormond Beach, Florida. Atglen: Schiffer Publishing, 2007.

Strickland, Alice. Ormond on the Halifax: A Centennial History of Ormond Beach, FL. Ormond Beach, Ormond Beach Historical Society, 1980.

Strickland, Alice. “James Ormond, Merchant and Soldier.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 41, No. 3.

Strickland, Alice. The Valiant Pioneers: A History of Ormond Beach, Volusia County, Florida. Ormond Beach: Ormond Beach Historical Society, 1974.

Pierson

Ponce Inlet

Henry, Ellen. A Beacon for Mosquito: The Story of the Ponce Inlet Lighthouse. Ponce Inlet: Ponce De Leon Inlet Lighthouse Preservation Association.

Henry, Ellen. The Ponce Inlet Lighthouse: An Illustrated History. Ponce Inlet: Ponce De Leon Inlet Lighthouse Preservation Association, 2018.

Strickland, Alice. “Ponce De Leon Inlet.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 43, No. 3.

Taylor, Thomas W. The Beacon of Mosquito Inlet: A History of the Ponce De Leon Inlet Lighthouse. Self published, 1993.

Port Orange

Cardwell, Harold D. Sr. and Priscilla D. Cardwell. Port Orange (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2000.

Cardwell, Harold D. Sr. and Priscilla D. Cardwell. Port Orange: A Great Community, Volume 1. Port Orange: City of Port Orange, 2001.

Samsula

Seville

Historical Museums and Societies

DeLand Naval Air Station Museum

Enterprise Preservation Society

Halifax Historical Society

Holly Hill Historic Society

Mary S. Harrell Black Heritage Museum

New Smyrna Museum of History YouTube

Ormond Beach Historical Society

Ormond Beach Historical Society YouTube

Ponce Inlet Lighthouse and Museum

Port Orange Historical Trust

Southeast Volusia Historical Society

Veterans Museum and Education Center

West Volusia Historical Society

West Volusia Historical Society YouTube

People

Akin, Edward N. Flagler: Rockefeller Partner and Florida Baron. Kent: Kent State University Press, 1988.

Carpenter, Jack. Beyond an Architect’s Legacy: Paintings of Wm. J. Carpenter. Self Published, 2020.

Cox, Merlin G. “David Sholtz: New Deal Governor of Florida.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 42, No 2.

Howell, Alice R., and Ronald L. Howell. John Anderson: His Life and Times in Ormond, Florida. Self Published, 2011.

Howell, Alice R., and Ronald L. Howell. Ruth Law, Daytona’s Pioneer Aviator, Her Place in Aviation History. Self Published, 2010.

Johnston, Sidney. “Bert Fish: From Volusia County Courthouse to American Embassy.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Volume 78, No 4 (2000), p. 430-450.

Long, Nancy Ann Zrinyi. Mary McLeod Bethune: Her Life and Legacy. Cocoa: Florida Historical Society Press, 2019.

Lucas, Harold V. and Ashley N. Robertson. A Tree that Grew in Midway: An Autobiography of Mr. Harold V. Lucas, Jr. Self Published, 2016.

McCluskey, Audrey Thomas. “Mary McLeod Bethune’s Impact on Daytona.” Florida Historical Quarterly (October 1994).

Preston, Ashley Robertson. Mary McLeod Bethune the Pan-Africanist. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2023.

Robertson, Ashley N. Mary McLeod Bethune in Florida: Bringing Social Justice to the Sunshine State. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2015.

Schwartz, Gerald, editor. A Woman Doctor’s Civil War: The Diary of Esther Hill Hawks. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1989.

Vogle, Bob. Fighting to WinNashville, Turner Publishing, 2001.

Wournos, Aileen. Monster: My True Story. London: John Blake Publishing, 2004.

Websites and Blogs

DeBary Hall Historic Site

Volusia County History

Volusia History

Volusia Remembers

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