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Haunted America New Releases from Arcadia Publishing

Haunted America New Releases from Arcadia Publishing.

Arcadia Publishing continues their Haunted America series with two new releases for your consideration. Both books are Florida based and should be of interest to readers interested in ghosts, haunted history, and Florida history.

After you enjoy this post about two new releases in the Haunted America series, read more of my posts related to Arcadia Publishing titles,  using   THIS LINK.

Arcadia Publishing has generously supplied complimentary review copies of two new releases in their Haunted America series of books. I will be providing book reviews for these books in the near future. Both books are now available for pre-release purchase through your local bookstore or online outlets.

Haunted America New Releases from Arcadia Publishing.

 

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Haunted Florida Ghost Towns

Haunted Florida Ghost Towns Haunted America New Releases Arcadia Publishing

Leigh, Heather. Haunted Florida Ghost Towns. Charleston: History Press, 2024. 128 pages, ISBN 9781467156479, $21.99.

The term “ghost towns” brings to mind communities from the Old West where there were once bustling Boom Towns but today are abandoned and lonely pieces to the puzzles of the past. With this image ingrained into a person’s mind, it is challenging to visualize ghost towns with sandy beaches and palm trees swaying in the wind. A little-known fact about Florida is it is home to more than 250 ghost towns, many of which remain the home for the spirits of former inhabitants, civil war deserters, pirates, and more. Haunted Florida Ghost Towns covers the many abandoned locations in the Sunshine State where paranormal entities are known to roam. Take a journey into the world of the supernatural and learn the history behind why Florida has so many ghost towns and the energy that remains to fuel paranormal activity.

 

Haunted America New Releases from Arcadia Publishing.Take a ghost bus tour in beautiful York, England.
Enjoy 75 spooky minutes of sightseeing in York, England on board the Ghost Bus! Your creepy conductor will show you the city’s top sights and give you bone-chilling and humorous insights into some of the more gruesome events in York, England’s past. Click the image or THIS LINK for information and to book your ghost bus tour.

 

Haunted Indian River County

Haunted Indian River County Haunted America New Releases from Arcadia PublishingLawson, Lawrence. Haunted Indian River County. Charleston, History Press, 2024. 139 pages, ISBN 978467155748, $21.99

Indian River County is an idyllic vacation spot on Florida’s east coast, not far south of Cape Canaveral. Known as part of the state’s famed “Treasure Coast,” many are unaware of the deep and fascinating history this area played in the development of the Sunshine State. Also lost among its visitors and residents are the chilling stories of the hauntings that accompany this rich history. It is here that a man named Waldo still looks after his family and properties, six decades after his death. Or a retired preacher is seen digging up his hidden treasure, days after he died .

 

 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. Affiliate programs or sponsors providing products do not influence the views expressed in this post.

 

eCampus.com

Hidden History of Civil War Florida at Reflections of Manatee

Hidden History of Civil War Florida

Hidden History of Civil War Florida

Please join me on Saturday, February 17 in Bradenton at Reflections of Manatee. We’ll be discussing the Hidden History of Civil War Florida.  The Civil War continues to be a hot button issue more than 160 years later. Come and hear about some of the lesser known aspects of the war in the Sunshine State.

My book, Hidden History of Civil War Florida, published by Arcadia Publishing, has proven very popular and I am honored to have been asked to speak here.

As an FYI, I will not be discussing the Battle of Olustee and it is not covered in my book. There are several excellent full-length books available on the topic. In the limited space I had available in my book, I could not have done justice to the topic.

I am proud to announce this talk is sponsored in part by Florida Humanities. Thanks to their support, this event is free and open to the public. Come out to Reflections of Manatee and let’s discuss the Hidden History of Civil War Florida.

This post may contain affiliate links including links to Amazon. 

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Book Review: Sorrento, Mount Plymouth, & East Lake County written by Bob Grenier

Sorrento, Mount Plymouth, and East Lake County written by Bob Grenier

Thank you for taking time to read my book review of Sorrento, Mount Plymouth, and East Lake County  written by Bob Grenier and published by Arcadia Publishing. This book makes a solid contribution to Lake County and Florida history.

Sorrento, Mount Plymout East Lake County book reviewGrenier, Bob and the East Lake Historical Society. Sorrento, Mount Plymouth, and East Lake County (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing.  2023. 128 pages, b/w photos. ISBN 9781467109420, $23.99.

Lake County, Florida is a rapidly growing area in Central Florida with Clermont being a bedroom community for Orlando, but also with proximity to Tampa. With a population of 297,000 in 2010, the county now boasts a staggering 410,000 persons just over a decade later, a growth of over 71%. When a county grows this fast, how do long term residents keep up with their history? As the number of transplants, often with no roots or desire to put down real roots, grows, what can be done to preserve the legacies of those who have built these now booming areas?

While the Clermont and west Lake County areas are not covered in this book, Bob Grenier and the East Lake Historical Society have provided a fine volume that will go far in making sure the names, deeds, and legacies of those from the East Lake County area will not be forgotten.

Mr. Grenier is well qualified to have gathered photos and penned a volume such as this. He is the author of several other Images of America volumes including works on Tavares, and Leesburg, along with books on Central Florida veterans from the Civil War, and World War II. Bob is a well known speaker throughout the region and has presented his work at many museums and historical societies. Mr. Grenier exhibits a sincere passion for his subjects both in writing and in his presentations. If you get a chance to hear him present, I recommend attending.

Bob has been a resident of Lake County, Florida since 1985 when he moved south from Illinois. Originally settling in Mount Plymouth, Bob was familiar with the area. When the East Lake Historical Society was founded he was able to reconnect with the area. He has put his experience as an author, public servant, and museum director to work in compiling this fascinating volume.

 

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East Lake County is often overlooked in comparison to the cities in the mid and western parts of the county. As mentioned, Clermont is rapidly growing, having grown to almost 50,000 residents on its own, up from 28,000 in 2010. Cities such as Mount Dora, Leesburg, and Tavares, the county seat, often garner the most attention as might be expected. What of the small communities of east Lake County? They continue to be home to dedicated residents, proud of their local communities.

Mr. Grenier starts the book off with an interesting, but brief, two page introduction to his subject. Here, he quickly covers his subject matter. Here we learn of the Sorrento Immigration Service and how northern migrants helped develop the town in the post Civil War years. Special mention is given to Major Alexander St. Clair-Abrams, a man Mr. Grenier is well associated with, having expertly put together a  volume of Abrams writings.

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Mount Plymouth is described by Mr. Grenier as “a Currier and Ives painting come to life” (page 8). Here we learn of the Mount Plymouth Corporation and the plans of powerful men such as real estate developer H. Carl Dann, John Pirie of Carson Pirie Scott and Company fame, and baseball legend Connie Mack. Their dream was to develop a 5,000 acre parcel into a winter resort, reminiscent of the Scottish countryside.

The small community of Cassia on State Road 44, only about ten minutes from the Lake/Volusia County line is home to the annual Cassia Day, an event filled with food, games, music, and community, to help celebrate the heritage of this area which can trace its first settlers to the 1850s. I have often passed through Cassia on State Road 44 and never given it a moments consideration. That oversight needs to be rectified.

Readers are invited to find more of my book reviews from Arcadia Publishing. Please use this link.

The meat of the book is of course the photos, and this book is packed with them, including well over 200, spanning from the earliest days of these communities to more modern times helping show how these towns have evolved but still retain their sense of community. As can be expected, some of the image quality is better than others. The reproductions can only do so much based upon the source material. Overall though, I think you will be impressed.

Here we meet early settlers, families that often had to struggle to make their lives work. We also meet men like Sam Stoltz, a self taught architect from Chicago. Mr. Stoltz created Tudor style homes in Mount Plymouth. We get to see photos of some of these “Plymouthonians” in the book. (page 64)

We are treated to beauty queens (page 58), Civil War soldiers (page 86), Camp Boggy Creek (page 97), and a gentleman by the name of “Possum Slim” and his amazing story (page 51). My favorite images may be of the Sorrento Baseball Club dating to around the turn of the twentieth century (page 17).

For those interested in Lake County history this is a must have. Readers interested in Florida history and the development and evolution of small Florida towns should consider adding this title to their library. Well written, with a diverse subject matter included, Mr. Grenier and the East Lake Historical Society have done a fine job in showcasing this unique part of Florida.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

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Volusia County History: A Bibliography with links

Allen Hall, Stetson University

Volusia County History A Bibliography with Links

Volusia County is located on the east coast of Florida and is home to more than 550,000 residents and growing daily. The county is currently a prime retirement area for transplants. Read further to discover my Volusia County History bibliography with links. It will help guide you to relevant source material, much of it easily obtainable.

County management is handled by an elected County Council consisting of two at-large members and five district elected members. The Chair position is one of the at-large members.

In 2021, nearly ten million visitors came to Volusia County. Many came to enjoy the “World’s Most Famous Beach,” while others arrived for NASCAR and other racing events, while Bike Week and Biketoberfest continue to draw strong crowds. Events such as the November Turkey Run, spring break, and the multi-day Welcome To Rockville concerts bring short-term visitors to the county. The Ocean Center draws sporting events, conventions, and the occasional concert which help put “heads in beds.”

While tourism is a main draw, the county has a wide and varied history consisting of colorful characters and events. This bibliography is my attempt to bring together a listing of material for readers related to Volusia County history. The term “history” is open to interpretation. I will try to be lenient in my use of the term.

I am providing links when I can so that you can purchase, or if possible, download or read online, for yourself. Materials may be available through the Volusia County Library system. Please check there. Even if it is not in your local branch, books can be sent to your preferred branch. Some books may be non-circulating such as those in genealogy collections and you will need to visit a particular location.

A couple of things about this bibliography. It is not meant to be all inclusive. This is an ongoing project and I invite your input with works I have not included. Also, new material is being published consistently. I try to keep up but this is a one person operation. I will be updating the list as required.

I will not be linking items such as newspaper articles. Mainstream magazine articles are fair game if they appear to have value. Peer reviewed academic journal articles will be included though availability of these may be quite limited. There have been, and continue to be, many local, “freebie,” magazine and entertainment guides. Keeping up with them is nearly impossible and finding older issues is the same. Unless something truly strikes me, I am avoiding these.

I am not including links to social media pages. Most of these pages/groups are not very good and the egalitarian nature of social media means anybody with a keyboard can make a statement and way too many take them as fact. Rather than be accused of playing favorites, I am avoiding these pages altogether.

Websites and blogs that show good solid research and writing will be included. Many good historians/writers are sharing their work in these formats. YouTube channels? Maybe.

Works of fiction are not generally included in this bibliography.

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I have chosen to set this listing up by city and a general county history section. My thought is that if you are looking for materials on Oak Hill you can find that heading rather than reviewing the entire list.

At the end of the list, you will find a listings of Volusia County based historical societies and museums. Be sure to reach out to these organizations if you have specific questions. There is also a section titled “people.” This is for those individuals who have made an impact on Volusia County for the better or the worse.

I make no guarantees as to the historical accuracy of the materials listed. I have not read and do not own copies of all of the sources lists. While I can certainly vouch for research standards many of the listed authors use, I recommend you draw your own conclusions. Works with foot/end notes and bibliographies are probably more reliable than those without. Notes and bibliographies allow readers to follow up on sources and verify statements.

I want this listing to be a joint project with you, the reader. If you know of sources I have not listed, please drop me a line or add a comment. Please provide as much information as possible and links if the material is digital. I will update the list with your suggestions.

I invite you to provide your thoughts on the resources listed below. If you feel a book or article is a must read, please let readers know and why you feel this way. If you think something is poor, that is acceptable. Please make sure your remarks are respectful and explain your reasoning. Is the research bad? Why do you think a work is not good? Personal attacks on authors or subject matter will not be approved for posting.

MagazineValues.com

General County Histories

Dreggors, William J. and John Stephen Hess. A Century of West Volusia County 1860-1960. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Society, 1993.

Dreggors, William J., and John Stephen Hess. A Pictorial History of West Volusia County 1870-1940. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Society, 1989.

Fitzgerald, T.E. Volusia County Past and Present. Daytona Beach: The Observer Press, 1937.

Francke, Arthur E. Jr., Alyce Hockaday Gillingham, and Maxine Carey Turner. Volusia The West Side. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Society, 1986.

French, Larry. Grand Hotels of West Volusia County (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2018.

Friend, Lani. “Volusia and Vibilia: Companion Plantations on the St. Johns River in Spanish and Territorial East Florida,” Florida Historical Quarterly. Volume 97,  No. 4 (2019): 379-406.

Gaby, Donald C. “Volusia; The Origin of a Name.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 76, No. 1.

Gold, Daniel Pleasant. History of Volusia County Florida. DeLand: E.O. Painter Printing Co., 1927.

Hebel, Ianthe Bond. Centennial History of Volusia County, Florida, 1854-1954. DeLand: Volusia County Historical Commission, 1955.

Langlotz, Patricia Callan. The Odyssey of an American School System: Volusia County Schools 1854-2000DeLand: Volusia County Schools, 2000.

Minshew, Paul and Jack Towle. “The 1998 Wildfires in Central Florida: Volusia County’s Own Armageddon.” Journal of Environmental Health. Vol. 61, No. 7 (1999): p. 22-26.

Schene, Michael G. Hopes, Dreams & Promises: A History of Volusia County, Florida. Daytona Beach: News-Journal Corporation, 1976.

Williamson, Ronald. Volusia County’s West Side: Steamboats & Sandhills (American Chronicles). Charleston: History Press, 2008.

Barberville

Brotemarkle, Benjamin D. Barberville (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2005.

Cassadaga

Guthrie, John J. Jr., Phillip Charles Lucas, and Gary Monroe, editors. Cassadaga: The South’s Oldest Spiritualist Community. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2000.

Guthrie, John J. Jr., “Seeking the Sweet Spirit of Harmony: Establishing a Spiritualist Community at Cassadaga, Florida, 1893-1933.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 77, No. 1.

Along the Beach Looking Toward Seabreeze Courtesy Florida MemoryVolusia County History Bibliography with links
Along the Beach Looking Toward Seabreeze
Courtesy Florida Memory

Daytona Beach

Atwell, Cheryl, and Vincent Clarida. Daytona Beach and the Halifax River Area (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 1998.

Cambre, Dale. Daytona Beach, Florida: A Postcard Tour (Postcard History Series). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 1998.

Cardwell, Harold D. Daytona Beach 100 Years of Racing (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing 2002.

Cardwell, Harold D. Historic Photos of Daytona Beach. Nashville: Turner Publishing Company, 2007.

Cardwll, Harold D., Sr., and Patricia D. Cardwell. Historic Daytona Beach (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2004.

Halifax Herald. This journal is published by the Halifax Historical Society and is a trove of information relating to the east side of Volusia County. Individual articles are not generally referenced in this listing. To the best of my knowledge there is no easy to use index for this journal.

Lamb, Chris. Blackout: The Untold Story of Jackie Robinson’s First Spring Training. Lincoln: Bison Books, 2006.

Lane, Mark. Legendary Locals of Daytona Beach. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2015.

Lempel, Leonard R. “The Mayor’s ‘Henchmen and Henchwomen, Both White and Colored,’ Edward H. Armstrong and the Politics of Race in Daytona Beach, 1900-1940.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 79, No. 3.

Light, Patti. Daytona Beach Lifeguards (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.

Punnett, Dick. Beach Racers: Daytona Before NASCAR. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2008.

Punnett, Dick, and Yvonne Punnett. Racing on the Rim: A History of the Annual Automobile Racing Tournaments Held on the Sands of the Ormond-Daytona Beach, Florida 1903-1910. Self Published, 1997.

Punnett, Dick, and Yvonne Punnett. Thrills, Chills and Spills: A Photographic History of Early Aviation on the World’s Most Bizarre Airport, Daytona Beach, Florida, 1906-1929. Self Published, 1990.

Smith, Dusty. Haunted Daytona Beach (Haunted America). Charleston: History Press, 2007.

Snyder, Robert E. “Daytona Beach: A Closed Society.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 81, No. 2.

Spencer, Donald. Greetings from Daytona Beach.  Atglen: Schiffer Publishing, 2008.

Strickland, Alice. “Florida’s Golden Age of Racing.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 45 No. 3 (1967): 253-269.

 

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DeBary

Brooks, Edith G. Saga of Frederick de Bary and de Bary Hall, Florida. Convention Press, 1968.

Allen Hall, Stetson University Courtesy Florida MemoryVolusia County History Bibliography with link
Allen Hall, Stetson University
Courtesy Florida Memory

DeLand

Blake, Jason. “The Integration of Stetson University.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 82, No. 4.

Caccamise, Louise Ball. Echoes of Yesterday: A History of the DeLand Area Public Library, 1912-1995. New Smyrna Beach: Luther’s Publishing Co.

Caccamise, Louise Ball. Memory Lane: A History of the Street Names of DeLand. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Society, 2013.

DeLand, Helen. Story of DeLand and Lake HelenNorwich: Louis W. Walden. 1928.

Hall, Maggi Smith, Michael Justin Holder, and West Volusia Historical Society. DeLand (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2003.

Hall, Maggi Smith. Stetson University (Campus History). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2005.

Johnston, Sidney. “The Historic Stetson University Campus in DeLand, 1884-1934” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 70, No. 3.

Lycan, Gilbert L. Stetson University: The First 100 Years. DeLand: Stetson University Press, 1983.

Roberts, L. Thomas, and West Volusia Historical Society. DeLand (Postcard History Series). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2014.

Smith, Dusty. Haunted DeLand and the Ghosts of West Volusia County (Haunted America). Charleston: History Press, 2008.

Stetson University Department of History

DeLeon Springs

Deltona

Edgewater

Sammons, Sandra Wallus, and Joanne Sikes. Edgewater (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2005.

Nomatic

Enterprise

Hartsfield, Stephen T. Under the Sheltering Tree: A Brief History of the Florida United Methodist Children’s Home, 1908-2008. N.P., N.D.

Holly Hill

Wiggins, Dean, and Adele Fredenberg. Gnomes of Holly Hill. Self Published, 2020.

Lake Helen

Schneider, Dorothy, and Ed L. Blackman. Lake Helen: The Gem of Florida The First 100 Years. Self Published, 2016.

New Smyrna Beach

Bockelman, Charles. Six Columns and Fort New Smyrna. DeLand: E.O. Painter Printing, Co., 1985.

Coe, Charles. Debunking the So Called Spanish Mission Near New Smyrna Beach. Washington D.C. 1941.

Cook-Wilson, Ethel. Isn’t That God’s Water? The Advent and Demise of Bethune-Volusia Beach Incorporated. Self Published, 2015.

Cumiskey, Kate. Surfing in New Smyrna Beach (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2010.

Detwiler, John Y. “Antiquities at and near New Smyrna, Florida.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 1, No. 3.

Doggett, Carita. Dr. Andrew Turnbull and the New Smyrna Colony of Florida. 

Grange, Roger and Dorothy Moore. Smyrnea Settlement: Archaeology & History of an 18th Century British Plantation in East Florida.  New Smyrna Beach: Southeast Volusia Historical Society, 2016.

Griffin, John W. and Robert H. Steinbach. Old Fort Park and Turnbull Canal System Archaeological Survey Project New Smyrna Beach, Florida. St. Augustine: Historic Property Associates, 1990.

Hudson, Fannie Minson. History of New Smyrna Black Businesses (with Present Area Businesses). Self Published, 2006.

Knighton, Annie Meeks. Bethune Beach Memoirs: A Pictorial History. Self published, 2014

Luther, Gary. History of New Smyrna: East Florida with Illustrations. New Smyrna Beach: Luther’s Publishing, 2009.

Panagopoulus, Epaminondes P. New Smyrna: An 18th Century Greek Odyssey. 1966.

Poertner, Bo. Old Town By the Sea: A Pictorial History of New Smyrna Beach. Overland Park: Walsworth Publishing. 2002.

Redd, Robert. Historic Sites and Landmarks of New Smyrna Beach. Charleston: History Press, 2015.

Redd, Robert. New Smyrna Beach (Postcard History). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2016.

Sheldon, Jane Murray. “Seminole Attacks Near New Smyrna, 1835-1856.” Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol. 8 No. 4 (1930): 188-196.

Sweett, Lawrence J. New Smyrna Beach (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2006.

Sweett, Zelia V. New Smyrna Beach (Then and Now.) Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2018.

Sweett, Zelia Wilson. New Smyrna, Florida in the Civil War. DeLand: West Volusia Historical Commission, 1963.

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Oak Hill

Dewees, Mary Redding. History and Memories of Oak Hill, Florida. Self Published, 1984.

Thompson, Dana. Oak Hill (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2009.

Orange City

Our Story of Orange City, Florida. Orange City: Village Improvement Association: Orange City Woman’s Club. 2020.

Hotel OrmondVolusia County History Bibliography with links
Hotel Ormond
Courtesy Florida Memory

Ormond Beach

Griffin, John W. “The Addison Blockhouse.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 30, No. 3.

Howell, Ronald L., and Alice R. Howell.  The Grand Hotel Ormond on the Halifax River, Ormond, Florida. Self Published.

Ormond Beach Historical Trust. Ormond Beach (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 1999.

Spencer, Donald. Greetings from Ormond Beach, Florida. Atglen: Schiffer Publishing, 2007.

Strickland, Alice. Ormond on the Halifax: A Centennial History of Ormond Beach, FL. Ormond Beach, Ormond Beach Historical Society, 1980.

Strickland, Alice. “James Ormond, Merchant and Soldier.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 41, No. 3.

Strickland, Alice. The Valiant Pioneers: A History of Ormond Beach, Volusia County, Florida. Ormond Beach: Ormond Beach Historical Society, 1974.

Pierson

Ponce Inlet

Henry, Ellen. A Beacon for Mosquito: The Story of the Ponce Inlet Lighthouse. Ponce Inlet: Ponce De Leon Inlet Lighthouse Preservation Association.

Henry, Ellen. The Ponce Inlet Lighthouse: An Illustrated History. Ponce Inlet: Ponce De Leon Inlet Lighthouse Preservation Association, 2018.

Strickland, Alice. “Ponce De Leon Inlet.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 43, No. 3.

Taylor, Thomas W. The Beacon of Mosquito Inlet: A History of the Ponce De Leon Inlet Lighthouse. Self published, 1993.

Port Orange

Cardwell, Harold D. Sr. and Priscilla D. Cardwell. Port Orange (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2000.

Cardwell, Harold D. Sr. and Priscilla D. Cardwell. Port Orange: A Great Community, Volume 1. Port Orange: City of Port Orange, 2001.

Samsula

Seville

Historical Museums and Societies

DeLand Naval Air Station Museum

Enterprise Preservation Society

Halifax Historical Society

Holly Hill Historic Society

Mary S. Harrell Black Heritage Museum

New Smyrna Museum of History YouTube

Ormond Beach Historical Society

Ormond Beach Historical Society YouTube

Ponce Inlet Lighthouse and Museum

Port Orange Historical Trust

Southeast Volusia Historical Society

Veterans Museum and Education Center

West Volusia Historical Society

West Volusia Historical Society YouTube

People

Akin, Edward N. Flagler: Rockefeller Partner and Florida Baron. Kent: Kent State University Press, 1988.

Carpenter, Jack. Beyond an Architect’s Legacy: Paintings of Wm. J. Carpenter. Self Published, 2020.

Cox, Merlin G. “David Sholtz: New Deal Governor of Florida.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Vol. 42, No 2.

Howell, Alice R., and Ronald L. Howell. John Anderson: His Life and Times in Ormond, Florida. Self Published, 2011.

Howell, Alice R., and Ronald L. Howell. Ruth Law, Daytona’s Pioneer Aviator, Her Place in Aviation History. Self Published, 2010.

Johnston, Sidney. “Bert Fish: From Volusia County Courthouse to American Embassy.” Florida Historical Quarterly. Volume 78, No 4 (2000), p. 430-450.

Long, Nancy Ann Zrinyi. Mary McLeod Bethune: Her Life and Legacy. Cocoa: Florida Historical Society Press, 2019.

Lucas, Harold V. and Ashley N. Robertson. A Tree that Grew in Midway: An Autobiography of Mr. Harold V. Lucas, Jr. Self Published, 2016.

McCluskey, Audrey Thomas. “Mary McLeod Bethune’s Impact on Daytona.” Florida Historical Quarterly (October 1994).

Preston, Ashley Robertson. Mary McLeod Bethune the Pan-Africanist. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2023.

Robertson, Ashley N. Mary McLeod Bethune in Florida: Bringing Social Justice to the Sunshine State. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2015.

Schwartz, Gerald, editor. A Woman Doctor’s Civil War: The Diary of Esther Hill Hawks. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1989.

Vogle, Bob. Fighting to WinNashville, Turner Publishing, 2001.

Wournos, Aileen. Monster: My True Story. London: John Blake Publishing, 2004.

Websites and Blogs

DeBary Hall Historic Site

Volusia County History

Volusia History

Volusia Remembers

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products. 

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Library Additions April 2023 (2) Arcadia Publishing

Sorrento, Mount Plymouth, and East Lake County
Sorrento, Mount Plymouth, and East Lake County
Sorrento, Mount Plymouth, and East Lake County

Thank you to my good friend, the historian and author, Bob Grenier for providing a complimentary copy of his new book, Sorrento, Mount Plymouth, and East Lake County. 

For full disclosure, Bob is a friend of mine and I have had the pleasure of reading his work in the past and also seeing him as a presenter. He puts his heart into his work and his passion shows through. I have no doubt this book will be the same and it has move to the top of my to-be-read pile.

From the publisher:

The town of Sorrento in East Lake County, named for the picturesque coastal town in southwestern Italy famous for its abundance of orange and lemon groves, was first settled in 1875 by the William Butts family. They were soon followed by the Kerr, Reeve, and Miner families.

That same year, five bachelors from Ohio arrived–among them being Albert Matlack and Ed Averill, who were instrumental in the development of this new community. Matlack, who opened the first mercantile business with Charles Adams, surveyed, charted, and mapped the new town, while Averill built the first tourist hotel, called the Averill House.

By 1882, many motivated new settlers arrived, which prompted swift growth in this scenic village carved from the Florida wilderness. A church, schoolhouse, drugstore, post office, packinghouses, dairy farms, cattle and horse ranches, and brick, lumber, and turpentine mills, framed by peach orchards and endless rows of orange groves, established Sorrento as a flourishing destination.

Mount Plymouth, distinct with its famed Storybook homes of renowned architect Sam Stoltz and the celebrity winter retreat of the Mount Plymouth Hotel, compliment the East Lake County landscape.

To find Bob’s other books, please use this LINK. He has several titles that will be of interest to those studying Lake County, FL history and a couple of excellent books in the Images of America series dealing with Central Florida WWII and Civil War veterans.

To see my reviews and posts dealing with Arcadia Publishing books, please use this LINK.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

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Book Review Sharpsburg (Images of America)

Sharpsburg

Sharpsburg Images of America Book ReviewBelow is my book review of Sharpsburg Images of America where authors Vernell and Tim Doyle strive to show the history of the town other than just the Battle of Antietam.

Doyle, Vernell and Tim Doyle. Sharpsburg (Images of America.) Charleston: Arcadia Publishing. 2009. ISBN 9780738568058, 127 pages, b/w photos, bibliography, $21.99.

The town of Sharpsburg, MD is a small community located in Washington County, near the border with Pennsylvania and is home to less than 1,000 residents. Sharpsburg was founded in 1763 and incorporated in 1832. The town is best known for the Civil War battle that occurred in September 1862, better known as the Battle of Antietam.  There, more than 130,000 combined Union and Confederate men fought it out to what many consider a stalemate that was ultimately a Union victory as Robert E. Lee and Confederate troops retreated south across the Potomac. The casualty toll from the battle was horrific, more than 22,000 dead, wounded, missing, or taken prisoner. More than 3,600 men would be killed. Today, many of the Union dead from this battle are interred at Antietam National Cemetery. Abraham Lincoln used the seeming Union victory as his opportunity to announce the Emancipation Proclamation.

In their Images of America series book, authors Vernell and Tim Doyle, a retired teacher and retired journalist respectively, try to remind us that the community of Sharpsburg is much more than the Battle of Antietam.  If you are unfamiliar with the series, authors pull together  around 150 images around their subject, providing concise captions to help further their story. In five chapters, the Doyles lay out a history of Sharpsburg where the battle plays only a partial role. Only one chapter is tied directly to the September 1862 fight. In fact, they make their point right from the start. The cover photo of the book features the J. Hammond General Merchandise store and was taken in August 1932.

In their five chapters, the Doyle’s outline the history of a small Maryland community, from its earliest days of small farms and the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal through more modern days using a mix of photographs from their own collection, locals, the National Park Service, and other sources. This diversity of sources becomes one of the strengths of the book rather than relying on images from the Library of Congress that have been recycled over and over. Sure, there are quite a few  images from the National Park Service and the Washington County Historical Society, but I bet the vast majority of these photos will be new to readers.

Chapters include the Town, the People, the Battlefield, the Canal, and the Area. In less than 130 pages, the battlefield is only given fifteen direct pages. I don’t find that to be a problem and neither should other readers, even those interested primarily in the Civil War. Even with the destructive impact that the Battle of Antietam had, it is important to realize the community was there before and still remains there today.

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Interesting photos to me included that of Nancy Campbell (page 61) a freed slave, who at the time was described at a woman of “extraordinary good conduct and good character as proven to us by the testimony of William Rulett.” The chapter dealing with the C&O Canal showed just how important this was in diversifying job opportunities at the time. Other photos show just how similar our worlds are. Smiling groups of school children could be from most any community. Church groups  and choirs could be interchangeable with towns in the south or the west. Local baseball teams might play on fields across the country if not for SHARPSBURG being emblazoned on their uniforms.

Each image is accompanied by a few lines of text, explaining to readers/viewers what they are seeing. The authors do not have a lot of space available for these captions and many are quite short thought others do go into more detail. These are easy to read and make each chapter easily digestible at a sitting.

And yet, while the Doyle’s do an admirable job of trying to keep the focus off the battle, one can’t help but return to September 1862. Period prints, with images of the Dunker Church, and armed men in rows ready for battle mix with later views of the Bloody Lane and Burnside Bridge. While president Franklin Roosevelt pays his respects during the 1937, 75th anniversary commemoration, a Lions Club meets on the battlefield for a group photo with a piece of artillery in 1962.

Can Sharpsburg ever shed its Civil War association? No, and the question really should be, would it want to.

Antietam Photographic Legacy of America's Bloodiest DayFor those looking for insights into the Battle or a heavily Battle focused book this is not for you. If battle images are what you seek, I strongly recommend Antietam: The Photographic Legacy of America’s Bloodiest Day. For those interested in the community, and perhaps what the real Sharpsburg has been in addition to a bloody battlefield, this book is recommended.

 

 

 

If you would like to read more of my book reviews, please use this link.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

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Book Review Shiloh National Military Park (Images of America)

Shiloh National Military Park book cover

Book Review Shiloh National Military Park

Thank you for taking time to read my book review of Shiloh National Military Park. Here, two experts will take you on a visual tour of the important battlefield and modern day military park.

McCutchen, Brian K., and Timothy B. Smith. Shiloh National Military Park (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing. 2012. ISBN 9780738591353. B/W photos. 127 pages. $21.99.

When armies under the commands of Ulysses S. Grant and Albert Sidney Johnston faced off on April 6 and 7, 1862, they could not have realized the carnage that would be left on the Tennessee battlefield. The Battle of Shiloh left almost 24,000 soldiers dead, wounded, missing, or captured, a staggering sum that included Confederate General Johnston.

In 1866, Pittsburg National Cemetery was established by the War Department; a name later changed to Shiloh National Cemetery in 1889.

Established on December 27, 1894, Shiloh National Military Park now serves as a reminder of those terrible two days of fighting that helped set in motion the events of the next three years. The park first operated under the guidance of the War Department but was moved to the National Park Service in 1933.

This 1894 legislation allowed for participating states to place monuments and memorials on the park grounds. The park as we know it today was beginning to take shape.

The Images of America series of books does an excellent job of providing access to usually older photos that the general public may not otherwise have the opportunity to view. In Shiloh National Military Park, authors Brian K. McCutchen and Timothy B. Smith achieve this standard, using images from the park collection.

Book Review Shiloh National Military Park
Shiloh Conquer or Perish book cover. Click to order.McCutchen is a former park ranger at Shiloh and has served at other national parks. Timothy B. Smith is a professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Martin. He is a leading scholar on the Battle of Shiloh and has authored what many consider the definitive volume on the battle, Shiloh: Conquer or Perish.

In this Images of America title, the authors showcase just over 200 images, broken into seven chapters. As might be expected in a collection spanning longer than 150 years, some images have reproduced much better than others. Occasionally there are images that seem a bit fuzzy and hazy. This is not a major distraction however. Each image contains a caption with most being around fifty words. The captions are easy to read and bring additional life to the images. 

I particularly enjoyed the chapter titled, “Memories in Stone and Bronze: Monuments of Shiloh.” This chapter highlights just a few of the more than 150 monuments that are located throughout the 4,000+ acres of the park. As McCutchen and Smith state, “To the veterans of America’s first monster battle…the statuary was much more. It embodied full representations of the brave solders of North and South and thus told the stories that they wished to convey to future generations.: (p.57)

A little-known aspect of the battlefield that the authors cover is the cyclone of October 14, 1909. This storm, that appears to have been building throughout the day, killed seven and injured thirty-three. Damage to the park and cemetery were considerable with Congress ultimately allocating $8,000 for the national cemetery and almost $20,000 for repairs and reconstruction at the park. In just over a dozen photos, the damage to the park is shown, with trees uprooted, buildings destroyed, and monuments smashed.

The beauty of a book such as this is its simplicity. A reader can know nothing of the battle and still enjoy the rich history on the pages, the book serving as a potential gateway to further study. For those knowledgeable on the battle and the terrain of the battlefield there is still plenty to learn here. Chances are good that many of the images will be new, even to seasoned students of the battle.

 This is not a new release, and the reality is, an expert such as Smith could probably release several similar volumes. Recommended for anybody studying the battle or planning to visit the Shiloh National Military Park.

Thank you for reading my book review of Shiloh National Military Park. I invite you to read more of my book reviews of Arcadia Publishing titles by using THIS LINK. 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.


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Book Review: Civil War Generals of Indiana written by Dr. Carl E. Kramer

Civil War Generals of Indiana

Kramer, Carl E. Civil War Generals of Indiana. Charleston: History Press. 2022. 140 pages, 136 pages of text. Bibliography, b/w images. ISBN 9781467151955, $23.99.

In his acknowledgements and introduction, author Dr. Carl E. Kramer, states that this book has been an off and on-again project for more than sixty years having started it while a freshman in high school in 1961. As with any student new to Civil War studies, the term “General” can be confusing at best, thus Kramer’s long-term quest for clarity.

Let’s count down the opportunities for use of the title along with Dr. Kramer. There are those who receive appointment to the rank of general (brigadier and higher). Of course, during the Civil War that could mean in the regular army or as a general of volunteers. Promotions to the rank of general were nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

Second, you have Brevet Generals, those receiving a sort of temporary promotion to the rank but no real promotion. These brevets were often handed out based upon some noteworthy battle achievement most often made by a colonel or maybe even lieutenant colonel. You weren’t going to be made a brevet general from the rank of sergeant. Brevets to lower officer positions were also possible during the war.

The third opportunity for using the rank of general is from State Troops. These were most often militia groups and the appointment was made by the state governor.

Finally, you have those men who were just called general. They may have received the nickname for being a local leader, maybe it was sarcastic, or perhaps they gave themselves the moniker and it stuck for whatever reason. Needless to say, these men were not generals in the way Kramer is using the term.

As has been pointed out by Andrew Wagenhoffer, the issue of determining who is a Hoosier and who isn’t is a tricky one. Then, as now, people moved around. Family members often followed each other, at times following perceived economic or educational opportunities.

In determining if a “general” was eligible for inclusion, Kramer relied heavily on the standard work in the field, Generals in Blue written by Ezra Kramer. For state level generals, he relied upon Indiana in the War of the Rebellion, a multi volume report issued in 1869 and available in a reprint edition.

Determining a tie to Indiana became more difficult for Dr. Kramer as this can mean differing things to different people. Kramer settled on three criteria for inclusion in his book. The first is birth; anyone born in Indiana who met the other criteria is included. The second qualifying criteria is for men who were born elsewhere but relocated to Indiana and spent a significant part of their lives in the state. The term “significant” is not defined and so this criterion remains vague. The final criteria that merits inclusion is for men “who arrived in Indiana early in the war, played an important role in organizing the state’s military operations and maintained a significant presence after the war.” This criterion is again vague and open to interpretation as the terms important and significant are not defined.

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Ultimately, Dr. Kramer has decided upon 121 men; including 44 full United States generals, 1 Confederate general (Francis Asbury Shoup), 62 Union brevet generals, and 14 state service generals. Twenty-one generals were born in Indiana as were 24 brevet generals.

Robert Huston Milroy courtesy Library of Congress
Major General Robert Huston Milroy
Image courtesy Library of Congress

Most of the biographies are one page long. A large number of the entries contain a photo, the majority of which are from the Library of Congress. The short length of each entry makes this book appropriate to pick up and put down at your leisure. Each biography can be read in a matter of a few minutes allowing readers the flexibility to read multiple titles without worries of being bogged down. Biographies can be read in any order with no concern about being confused.

One drawback I did note is that the book does not contain end/foot notes. There is a two-page bibliography however. For me, I would have found it helpful, or at least interesting, if Dr. Kramer had listed a recommended biography (if available) for each of the entries. Brief introductions to these interesting men could leave some readers wanting more. Overall, for a book of this nature these are minor quibbles. It is also possible that the author reached his word count limit. Arcadia/History Press try to stick to specific word counts in order to keep their titles within a page limit and thus helping control price.

For those interested in the role of Indiana in the Civil War this is a book that should be considered. Available at a budget friendly price it allows for a handy reference rather than trying to find Indiana generals at random in Warner.

Arcadia Publishing has generously provided a complimentary review copy of this book. Arcadia Publishing has also published five titles I have written as of the date of this post. This review has not been influenced by these factors and is based upon my reading of the work.

If you would like to read book reviews of other Arcadia/History Press titles, please click HERE. 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.


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Library Additions: Lady Rebels of Civil War Missouri written by Larry Wood

Lady Rebels of Civil War Missouri book cover

Lady Rebels of Civil War Missouri

Wood, Larry, Lady Rebels of Civil War Missouri. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing. 2022. 154 pages, 129 pages of text. Bibliography, notes, index, b/w photos. ISBN 9781467150095, $23.99.

Thank you to my good friends at Arcadia Publishing for providing a complimentary review copy. A more detailed review will be forthcoming.

Although war was traditionally the purview of men, the realities of America’s Civil War often brought women into the conflict. They served as nurses, sutlers, and washerwomen. Some even disguised themselves as men and joined the fight on the battlefield. In the border state of Missouri, where Southern sympathies ran deep, women sometimes clashed with occupying Union forces because of illegal, covert activities like spying, smuggling, and delivering mail. When caught and arrested, the women were often imprisoned or banished from the state. In at least a couple of cases, they were even sentenced to death. Join award-winning author Larry Wood as he chronicles the misadventures and ordeals of the lady rebels of Missouri.

You may review other blog posts related to Arcadia Publishing by clicking HERE.

To learn more about the military role of Missouri in the Civil War I recommend The Civil War in Missouri: A Military History written by Louis S. Gerteis.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products. 

 

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