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Burial Sites of United States Presidents A Listing

Presidential Seal

Below is a brief reference to the burial sites of United States Presidents. Only 46 men (well, really 45 since Grover Cleveland was both the 22nd and 24th president) have served in the role of President of the United States. While visiting all these sites will take some coordination, time, and cost, it is certainly an achievable goal. Some of the burials contain elaborate monuments while others are much more  commonplace and almost indistinguishable from their surroundings.

This listing includes links (click the name of your favorite president) so that you can determine when locations are open and if there are any associated costs. Most modern presidents have been buried onsite of their presidential library and museum. These websites are often tremendous sources of information on the Presidents and their accomplishments, especially those operated by the National Archives. For some of the earlier presidents, the sites related to their burials are lacking and you will need to seek outside sources.

This information on these sites may of course be slanted toward putting the president in a positive light. My recommendation is to read several books with different points of view in order to achieve a more balanced look at each of these successful, but still human and flawed, men. For more modern presidents, good luck. The literature is a minefield with most of it being partisan garbage.

 

1             George Washington        December 14, 1799         Mount Vernon   Fairfax County, Virginia

Mount Vernon, the final resting place for President George Washington and his wife Martha. Click the link to reserve your tickets.
Mount Vernon is the incredible estate of George and Martha Washington. Click the photo or THIS LINK to reserve your entry ticket and audio guide.

2             John Adams        July 4, 1826        United First Parish Church            Quincy, Massachusetts

3             Thomas Jefferson             July 4, 1826        Monticello          Charlottesville, Virginia

4             James Madison June 28, 1836    Montpelier         Orange, Virginia

5             James Monroe   July 4, 1831        James Monroe Tomb,                 Hollywood Cemetery                Richmond,  Virginia

Click the photo for information and to purchase tickets for an incredible tour of Hollywood Cemetery, final resting spot for President James Monroe.
Hollywood Cemetery is full of history including that of Presidents James Monroe, whose tomb is shown in the image, and John Tyler. Click the image or THIS LINK for information and to purchase tour tickets for Hollywood Cemetery, in Richmond, VA.

 

6             John Quincy Adams         February 23, 1848           United First Parish Church                Quincy, Massachusetts

7             Andrew Jackson               June 8, 1845       The Hermitage   Nashville, Tennessee

8             Martin Van Buren            July 24, 1862      Kinderhook Reformed Church Cemetery                Kinderhook, New York

Nomatic

9             William Henry Harrison April 4, 1841      William Henry Harrison Tomb State Memorial             North Bend, Ohio

10          John Tyler           January 18, 1862             Hollywood Cemetery      Richmond, Virginia

11          James K. Polk     June 15, 1849    Tennessee State Capitol      Nashville, Tennessee

12          Zachary Taylor   July 9, 1850        Zachary Taylor National Cemetery             Louisville, Kentucky

13          Millard Fillmore                March 8, 1874   Forest Lawn Cemetery    Buffalo, New York

14          Franklin Pierce   October 8, 1869               Old North Cemetery       Concord, New Hampshire

15          James Buchanan              June 1, 1868       Woodward Hill Cemetery             Lancaster, Pennsylvania

16          Abraham Lincoln              April 15, 1865    Lincoln Tomb, Oak Ridge Cemetery                Springfield, Illinois

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Handmade in the United States, 3′ x 5′ American Flag package including mounting hardware. “Our flags are 100% made in the USA by highly skilled seamstresses, many of whom lost work as the American textile industry moved overseas.” Click the photo or THIS LINK for information and to order.

17          Andrew Johnson               July 31, 1875      Andrew Johnson National Cemetery                Greeneville, Tennessee

18          Ulysses S. Grant                July 23, 1885      General Grant National Memorial                New York, New York

Heavily illustrated and with contributions from historians Richard Norton Smith and Douglas Brinkley, Who's Buried in Grant's Tomb? is about the presidents' lives as much as it is about their final resting places. The book's collection of the presidents' last words, from Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "I have a terrific headache" to John Adams's "Thomas Jefferson still survives" offers a poignant and sometimes humorous look at the last moments of the great men. This is a great way to encounter the presidents, from the great ones to the near-forgottens. Who's Buried in Grant's Tomb? belongs in the glove box of every traveler and the bedside table of every fan of the American presidency and American history. Click the image to order your copy and learn more about burial sites of United States Presidents.
Heavily illustrated and with contributions from historians Richard Norton Smith and Douglas Brinkley, Who’s Buried in Grant’s Tomb? is about the presidents’ lives as much as it is about their final resting places. Who’s Buried in Grant’s Tomb? belongs in the glove box of every traveler and the bedside table of every fan of the American presidency and American history. CLICK HERE or the image to order your copy.

 

19          Rutherford B. Hayes        January 17, 1893             Spiegel Grove     Fremont, Ohio

20          James A. Garfield             September 19, 1881        James A. Garfield Memorial,     Lake View Cemetery Cleveland, Ohio

21          Chester A. Arthur             November 18, 1886        Albany Rural Cemetery   Menands                New York

22/24    Grover Cleveland             June 24, 1908    Princeton Cemetery        Princeton, New Jersey

23          Benjamin Harrison           March 13, 1901                Crown Hill Cemetery       Indianapolis, Indiana

25          William McKinley             September 14, 1901       McKinley National Memorial                Canton, Ohio

26          Theodore Roosevelt         January 6, 1919                Youngs Memorial Cemetery                Oyster Bay, New York

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27          William Howard Taft        March 8, 1930   Arlington National Cemetery       Arlington, Virginia

28          Woodrow Wilson             February 3, 1924              Washington National Cathedral                Washington District of Columbia

29          Warren G. Harding          August 2, 1923        Harding Tomb     Marion, Ohio

30          Calvin Coolidge January 5, 1933                Plymouth Notch Cemetery           Plymouth Notch, Vermont

31          Herbert Hoover  October 20, 1964             Hoover Presidential Library          West Branch, Iowa

32          Franklin D. Roosevelt      April 12, 1945    Springwood        Hyde Park, New York

33          Harry S. Truman               December 26, 1972         Truman Presidential Library                Independence, Missouri

Visit the Harry S. Truman "Little White House" in Key West, FL. Click the link for information and to book your visit.
Visit the Harry S. Truman “Little White House” in Key West, FL. Click THIS LINK for information and to book your visit.

34          Dwight D. Eisenhower     March 28, 1969                Eisenhower Presidential Center                Abilene, Kansas

35          John F. Kennedy               November 22, 1963        Kennedy Gravesite  Arlington National Cemetery          Arlington, Virginia

36          Lyndon B. Johnson          January 22, 1973             Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park    Stonewall, Texas

37          Richard Nixon    April 22, 1994    Nixon Presidential Library             Yorba Linda, California

Click the photo for information and to book your Nixon Presidential Library tour.Burial sites of United States Presidents

Visit the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum and find out why it has been voted Orange County’s Best Attraction and Orange County’s Best Museum by LA Times readers. Tour the most modern presidential museum in the United States to learn about Richard Nixon the man, his life, and his presidency. Click THIS LINK or the image for information and to book your admission.

 

38          Gerald Ford         December 26, 2006         Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum                Grand Rapids, Michigan

39          Jimmy Carter

40          Ronald Reagan   June 5, 2004       Reagan Presidential Library          Simi Valley, California

41          George H. W. Bush          November 30, 2018        George Bush Presidential Library                College Station, Texas

42           Bill Clinton

43           George W. Bush

44           Barrack Obama

45          Donald Trump

46          Joe Biden

 

Thank you for taking this tour of the burial sites of United States Presidents. While these are the most famous men in our countries history, why not take a tour of those who have been forgotten. In Charnel Cemetery in DeLand, FL, you can learn about a cemetery for those who were indigent at death yet were still provided with a proper burial.

 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

In this history-driven memoir, Deion reconstructs his decade-long, cross-country quest and analyzes the evolution of his perspective on the commanders-in-chief and what it means to visit a cemetery. Click the photo to purchase your copy.Find the burial sites of United States Presidents in this interesting book.
In this history-driven memoir, Deion reconstructs his decade-long, cross-country quest and analyzes the evolution of his perspective on the commanders-in-chief and what it means to visit a cemetery. Click THIS LINK or the photo to purchase your copy.
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Library Additions June 2023 (1) Mercer University Press and more

A Wilderness of Destruction

Library Additions June 2023 (1)

We will start June 2023 off with a couple of new additions to the library. Both of these books were purchased by me and are not provided by a publisher or distributor.

Ross, Peter. A Tomb with a View: The Stories and Glories of Graveyards. London: Headline Publishing. 2020. ISBN 9781472267788, 352 pages, index, selected bibliography, b/w photos. $17.99.

Enter a grave new world of fascination and delight as award-winning writer Peter Ross uncovers the stories and glories of graveyards. Who are London’s outcast dead and why is David Bowie their guardian angel? What is the remarkable truth about Phoebe Hessel, who disguised herself as a man to fight alongside her sweetheart, and went on to live in the reigns of five monarchs? Why is a Bristol cemetery the perfect wedding venue for goths?

All of these sorrowful mysteries – and many more – are answered in A Tomb with A View, a book for anyone who has ever wandered through a field of crooked headstones and wondered about the lives and deaths of those who lie beneath.

So push open the rusting gate, push back the ivy, and take a look inside.

 

 

A Wilderness of Destruction
A Wilderness of Destruction

Waters, Zack C. A Wilderness of Destruction: Confederate Guerrillas in East and South Florida, 1986-1865. Macon: Mercer University Press.  2023. ISBN 9780881468816. 259 pages, index, bibliography, foot notes, b/w photos. $39.00.

Modern historians have consistently treated Florida as a military backwater. Despite that assessment, Rebel guerrillas blocked repeated Union attempts to establish a stronghold in the Florida’s interior. After the “abandonment” of Florida by the Confederate government, in early 1862, Gov. John Milton organized guerrilla units to protect the state’s citizens. These irregular companies kept Union forces largely confined to a few coastal outposts (St. Augustine, Fernandina, and Ft. Myers), though the state’s citizens suffered greatly from the depredations of Unionist units.

After the Federals capture of Vicksburg, the South’s only significant source of beef were the vast herds in Florida. It fell to the state’s Rebel partisans to protect the state’s interior, thereby keeping open routes for the delivery of longhorns to the South’s major armies. Skirmishes and battles raged throughout Florida, but the flow of beef cattle halted only after Appomattox.

I do receive a very generous “thank you” in the acknowledgements but those of you who know me understand I have purchased this book for my Florida Civil War library without hesitation. Zack is an excellent historian and this is a book covering an important part of the Florida Civil War history.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products. 

 

Atlanta: Civil War to Civil Rights private tour. Tours last 3 hours. Click the photo for more information.
Click HERE, or the image above, to learn more and book tickets for an Atlanta: From Civil War to Civil Rights Private Tour.  Follow the history of Atlanta from a major American Civil War battlefield to the center of the US Civil Rights movement. Visit the site of the Battle of Atlanta, the oldest cemetery in the city, and the Martin Luther King Historic District. This incredible 3 hour tour will provide you a whole new appreciation and perspective for the city of Atlanta. 

 

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Frank Fanovich Major League Baseball Player New York City Police Officer: In Memory

Frank Fanovich

Frank Fanovich       

Frank Fanovich lived a life many boys have dreamed of. Frank Fanovich became a major league baseball player and then served as an officer with the  New York City police department.

On January 11, 1923, in the Bronx, NY, Frank and Mary Fanovich welcomed the birth of their son, Frank Joseph. The eleventh was a beautiful, winter New York day with the high temperature reaching 34 degrees Fahrenheit. Overnight temperatures fell to 25 degrees Fahrenheit. No snow fell on the city that day. It was without doubt a blessed day in the Bronx.

RMS PannoniaFrank Fanovich Major League Baseball Player
RMS Pannonia

Frank, Sr. was born in Pesino, Italy on November 27, 1892. He was five feet, eight inches tall, and weighed 161 pounds. His hair was brown, he had gray eyes, and a fair complexion. He worked as a chauffeur. On August 24, 1912 he arrived at the Port of New York aboard the RMS Pannonia, set to start a new life in a new country, one full of opportunity. On March 8, 1927, married and with a young son, his Naturalization papers were submitted.

As a boy, Frank, Jr. played sandlot baseball and grew to love, and become good at, the game. Later in life he was to play professional baseball, reaching the pinnacle, the Major League, if only for a short period of time.

While it appears, Frank did not complete high school, his World War II Draft Card and his enlistment records show him working for Phelps Dodge as a skilled lineman and serviceman. Frank was a tall and lanky young man, standing six feet tall and weighing 160 pounds. He had brown hair and eyes with a ruddy complexion and a scar on his right cheek.

As a member of the “Greatest Generation,” Frank proudly served his country during World War II. He enlisted in the United States Army on November 25, 1942, in New York City as a private in the Signal Corps. His enlistment was “for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law.” Frank provided his service stationed in England. Private Fanovich returned to the United States aboard the Queen Mary, docking in New York City on July 11, 1945.


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from: Flagshirt

Shortly after arriving home, Frank, Jr. married his childhood sweetheart, Yolanda Franco, who often went by the name Gloria, on February 2, 1946, in Kingsbridge, Bronx. The happy couple were married for 65 years before Frank’s passing on August 27, 2011. Yolanda and Frank do not appear to have had any children, as none were mentioned in Franks obituary.

Shortly after exchanging their nuptials, “Lefty,” as Frank was nicknamed, was signed by the New York Giants as an amateur free agent. The young copule hitched their immediate futures to the whims of the baseball gods; i.e. managers, general managers, owners, and the talent in Frank’s left arm. He played for three different teams during the 1946 season, bouncing between the B and C minor league levels.

In 1947, Fanovich was sent/traded to the unaffiliated Watertown Athletics of the Border League; a team on the C level. Pitching in twenty-three games Fanovich compiled a 16-3 record and recorded a 2.85 earned run average. Playing in multiple positions as required, he played in a cumulative 59 games that season, In 99 at bats he legged out 32 hits for an impressive .323 batting average. Fanovich showed no power as a hitter with only three extra base hits, all doubles.

Frank Fanovich major league baseball player and later an officer with the New York City police department
Frank Fanovich major league baseball player with the Cincinnati Reds organization. Photo courtesy Baseball Reference

The Cincinnati Reds saw something they liked in the young pitcher and purchased his contract from Watertown, assigning him in 1948 to their AAA affiliate in Syracuse. For the Chiefs, he produced mixed results, compiling a 9-13 win/loss record for a team with an overall record of 77-73. While Fanovich struck out 120 batters, he struggled with control, walking 110. In a different era of baseball, the young pitcher threw thirteen complete games. With the stronger level of pitching, Franks batting numbers plunged. He hit only .219 in 64 at bats.

Things were looking up for the twenty-six-year-old pitcher as the 1949 season began. He made the roster for the Cincinnati Reds pitching out of the bullpen. He had been a starter during his minor league career but a chance in the majors was too good to overlook.

The season was not what the Reds and Fanovich might have hoped. Fanovich appeared in 29 games, compiling an 0-2 record with no saves, and a 5.40 earned run average. In only 43 innings pitched he logged 27 strikeouts and 28 base on balls. In his defense, the 1949 Reds were a poor team, finishing the season with a dismal 62-92-2 record. Fan support is what might be imagined for a team with a record like this. They finished with the lowest home attendance in the National League at just under 708,000 at Crosley Field.

With a not so grand start to his Major League career, Fanovich found himself back in the minors for the 1950 season, playing for the New York Giants AAA team, the Minneapolis Millers. Despite Fanovich providing an underwhelming 7-12 record, the Millers finished a league best 90-64. An amazing 24 players from the team spent some time in the Majors including Baseball Hall of Fame member Hoyt Wilhelm who led the team with fifteen wins.

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Frank Fanovich major league baseball player and New York City police officer
Frank Fanovich major league baseball player courtesy Findagrave 

Fanovich led a journeyman’s lifestyle for the next couple of years, bouncing around the minors, playing for four different teams before landing back in the Majors in 1953 with the Philadelphia Athletics. For Fanovich the results were much the same as in 1949. In his first game pitching for the A’s, he faced three batters, walking all of them. Pitching in only 26 games he compiled an 0-3 record and an earned run average of 5.55. His control had still not come around, issuing 37 bases on balls to go with only 37 strikeouts. The Athletics were to remain in Philadelphia for only one more season before moving to Kansas City.

The final two years of Frank Fanovich’s baseball career were spent in Richmond and San Antonio in the minor leagues. His stint in San Antonio at the AA level may have been the best of his career. He put up a 14-11 record, a 3.47 earned run average, while striking out 118 and walking only 97. His 210 innings pitched were a career high. He pitched eleven complete games including four shutouts. At age 32 it was a great way to leave the game that he had given so much to.

Fanovich posted a career MLB record of zero wins and five losses in 55 career games. His earned run average was 5.49. Fanovich was to fare better in the minors, compiling a 73-74 career win/loss record including 52 complete games. As might be expected, some minor league statistics from the period are incomplete or unavailable so it is not possible to make a full assessment of his success.

After retiring from baseball, Fanovich went on to a successful career with the New York City Police Department, eventually joining the Manhattan North Narcotics Division. He would work for NYPD for 27 years before he and Yolanda would retire to New Smyrna Beach in 1987.

In his retirement years, Frank enjoyed a good game of golf, often on the Hidden Lakes course near where he and Yolanda lived. He also retained his love of baseball, keeping up with his beloved New York Yankees.

 

After having led a full life, Fanovich passed away on August 27, 2011 at the age of 88. His remains are interred at Sea Pines Memorial Gardens in Edgewater, FL, in the All-Faiths Mausoleum.

Frank Fanovich was a major league baseball player and later officer with the New York City police department. Frank and his wife Yolanda are interred at Sea Pines Cemetery in Edgewater, FL in the All Faiths Mausoleum.
Frank & Yolanda Fanovich are interred in the All Faiths Mausoleum at Sea Pines Memorial Gardens in Edgewater, FL

An online memorial to Frank Fanovich may be found HERE. A memorial for Yolanda Fanovich may be found HERE.

Frank Fanovich was as major league baseball player and New York City police officer, living the dream of millions of boys and young men.

To read the stories of other Major League Baseball players associated with Volusia County, click HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

Subscribe to Baseball America and keep up with everything going on in the sportFrank Fanovich Major League Baseball player  blog post
Every issue features coverage of the majors, minors, college and high school baseball as well as prospects, prospects and more prospects. Whether you’re looking to win your fantasy league or stay on top of the game at all levels, Baseball America puts it all in your hands. Click the image or link for information and to subscribe at a great discounted price. 

 

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In Memory Lawrence Peacock World War I Casualty

Lawrence Peacock headstone

In Memory Lawrence Peacock. Lawrence S. Peacock came from a humble background. Lawrence was born on July 5, 1891 in Spring Garden, FL to parents Samuel D. and Martha (Daugharty) Peacock. Samuel was a farmer and the family lived in Precinct Four according to the 1900 United States Census. Lawrence was the fourth of five children; John, Thomas, Margaret, and Violet. The 1910 United States Census placed the Peacock family at 46 E. New York Avenue.

Young Lawrence appears to have been an industrious young man, not afraid of hard work. He was the owner of a vulcanizing company located in the downtown DeLand area. He regularly advertised in the local newspaper, “Tires and Tubes, All Work Guaranteed”.

Vulcanization is the process of using heat to help harden rubber, thus increasing its lifespan and strength. For more information on vulcanization check the Wikipedia page.

 

A prime bachelor, Lawrence attracted the attentions of young Edith Baguley, “a talented musician and a popular young woman…” The two eligible DeLandites eloped on July 5, 1917. The service was performed by Reverend H. S. Rightmire at the Baptist church in Daytona Beach with only the reverend’s wife and Mrs. M. N. Baguley, Edith’s mother, in attendance.

The newly wed couple briefly honeymooned in St. Augustine, Jacksonville, and Pablo Beach, before returning to DeLand.

World events were closing in on young men around the globe and Lawrence S. Peacock was no exception. Peacock was drafted in mid-1918 and received notice he would be called to active duty.

In preparation for leaving DeLand for an unknown period, Lawrence sold his business to Mr. A. C. Clark, a young man from Miami.

Lawrence was transported to Camp Greenleaf at Fort Oglethorpe, GA for two months of training. His skills and abilities earned him a promotion from Private to Wagoner in Evacuation Ambulance Company No. 19 during his training.

USS George Washington
USS George Washington (ID#3018) underway at sea, 10 May 1918. Photographed from USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15), which was then operating off western France.
US Navy photo # NH 53885 from the collections of the US Navy Historical Center.

On September 22, 1918, he was sent to Camp Upton on Long Island, NY before being transferred to the Transport S.S. George Washington in preparation for transport to France.

It was during this transport to France that Peacock contracted pneumonia and passed away onboard. His death on October 9, 1918 was one of only thousands caused as a result of the 1918 influenza outbreak. The largest cause of death during the pandemic was pneumonia. 

 

 

 

 

Great InfluenzaThe 1918 influenza outbreak is estimated to have contributed to the deaths of nearly 100 million people. Historian John M. Barry has written what may be the definitive look at this pandemic. The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History is accessible and readable for those of us without a scientific background.

 

 

 

 

The remains of Lawrence S. Peacock were buried temporarily in Brest, France, a port city in Brittany, before being returned to DeLand in 1920. After the conclusion of hostilities, the Army returned the remains of Peacock, through New York City, where they were placed aboard a southbound train,  with a single soldier accompanying.

Members of the DeLand American Legion Post met the train and carried the remains to an awaiting hearse that secured the body to Allen’s Undertaking Parlors in preparation for the funeral on July 15, 1920.

The funeral was a somber affair. At 2:00 p.m. the parade left Allen’s on their way to Oakdale Cemetery. A squad of uniformed men, followed by the pall bearers, a group of Legionnaires, the family, and finally friends of the deceased made their way through the streets of DeLand.

Once the procession arrived at the cemetery, the flag draped coffin was carried to the burial site with uniformed men at parade rest. Dr. C. L. Collins talked about the war and its impact and provided a biographical sketch of the young soldier. Reverend C. E. Wyatt offered prayer. The service ended with a three-round volley over the grave and the blowing of taps by bugler Feasel.

Lawrence Peacock headstoneIn Memory Lawrence Peacock.
The headstone for Wagoner Lawrence Peacock as seen in Oakdale Cemetery, DeLand, FL

In the years following the burial of her husband, Edith was to remarry. On February 11, 1922, she married Pharris M. Stribling, a newspaper printer who worked for the local paper. The 1930 United States Census shows her to already have divorced Stribling and working as a stenographer in North Carolina where she lived with her mother.

A brief search shows that Edith does not appear to have married again. When she passed away on March 4, 1982, Edith was living in San Bernadino, CA.

Edith Irene Baguley Stribling is buried in Henry Cemetery, in Henry, Illinois, the same cemetery as her parents.

 

 

 

 

 

Wagoner Lawrence S. Peacock is memorialized today at the DeLand Memorial Hospital and Veterans Museum. This project was trumpeted in the local newspaper by DeLand Mayor S. A. Wood on February 19, 1919 and opened in 1920. DeLand Memorial Hospital would serve as the primary medical facility in DeLand until the opening of Fish Memorial Hospital in 1952. Today the building is home to City of DeLand offices and museum exhibits.

DeLand Memorial Hospital and Veterans Museum
A full exterior view of the circa 1920 DeLand Memorial Hospital and Veterans Museum building
World War I plaque at DeLand Memorial Hospital and Veterans MuseumIn Memory Lawrence Peacock.
A dedication plaque to West Volusia County soldiers who perished during World War I.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Original plaque on exterior of Hospital buildingIn Memory Lawrence Peacock.
An originally placed plaque dedicating the hospital as a Memorial to our boys for service rendered and sacrifice supreme

 

I hope you have enjoyed this in memory post to Lawrence S. Peacock, a wagoner during World War I. To view other posts related to Oakdale Cemetery, many of them military related, please click here.

Sources:

Multiple issues of the DeLand News were used to compile this article.

www.floridamemory.com

 

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In Memory: Amzi Harmon Civil War Medal of Honor Recipient

Amzi Harmon Headstone
Amzi Harmon Headstone
Original Union headstone and modern Medal of Honor bronze marker for Amzi D. Harmon.

A couple of years ago while wandering Mt. Peace Cemetery in Kissimmee, Florida, searching for the graves of my grandmother and grandfather; I came across the final resting spot of Amzi D. Harmon. The burial itself was rather unremarkable. In fact, I might not have even noticed it if not for the traditional Union soldier shape of the headstone.

It turns out Amzi D. Harmon received the Medal of Honor for actions during the Civil War. Granted, Medals of Honor for actions during the Civil War were awarded on a much less stringent basis than they have since. In fact, a total of 1,523 Medals of Honor were issued for service during the Civil War. In total, less than 3,500 Medals of Honor have been awarded in total.

Harmon received his Medal of Honor for actions in April 1865, while serving as a
Corporal in Company K of the 211th Pennsylvania at the Battle of Petersburg in
Virginia. His citation reads simply “Capture of Flag.”

The 211th PA was a regiment raised late in the war out of western Pennsylvania. Many of those enlisting had already served prior enlistments. Company K was raised primarily from Westmoreland County.In late 1864, the 211th were transferred to the 3rd Division of the IX Corps, serving under Brigadier General John F. Hartranft.

Those wishing to learn more about General Hartranft are directed to this biography.

The regiment later saw action during the breakthrough at Petersburg under the
command of Lieutenant Colonel Levi A. Dodd. During the fighting, the regiment
was to suffer 135 casualties including 21 men killed. Harmon was singled out in an
after action report by General Hartranft for his efforts and having secured the flag
of the 45th North Carolina during battle. (1) General Hartranft submitted Harmon’s
name for Medal of Honor consideration. (2)

Corporal Harmon was born April 18, 1845 in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.
After the war, he and dozens of other former Union soldiers moved to the
developing community of St. Cloud. Harmon arrived in Florida sometime between 1910 and 1920. In 1921, Harmon was named an honorary pall-bearer at the burial of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery. (4) Harmon lived in Florida until his death on October 9, 1927.

The story of Harmon’s headstone becomes a bit convoluted using Orlando Sentinel
newspaper articles. In 1995, Geoff Clark wrote that a man from New York brought
a marker noting Harmon’s honor (I assume this to be the bronze marker now on the
grave). The article goes on to state the New Yorker left town with the stone marker which ended up in a private museum in Tennessee. In 1996, Sentinel writer Jovida Fletcher states that the marker had been stolen, but was recovered from this again unnamed Tennessee private museum. (3)

No matter stolen or given, the returned headstone was rededicated in a ceremony held in
1995. I attempted to contact City of St. Cloud employees regarding participation of
the city Historic Preservation Board in this rededication but did not receive a reply.
Mt. Peace Cemetery in St. Cloud was founded in 1911 on a ten-acre tract deeded
by the Seminole Land and Investment Company. A Women’s Auxiliary was
formed with a stated goal “to aid in the work of improving and beautifying the
cemetery.” (5)

Today, Mt. Peace Cemetery is cared for by the City of St. Cloud. It is the final
resting place for more than 6,500 persons.

Notes
1) Geoff Clark. “Civil War Hero to be Honored.” Orlando Sentinel. August 2,
1995.
2) United States Government Printing Office. The War of the Rebellioin: A
Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies
Series I, Volume XLVI Part I Section II. Washington D.C. 1894. Page 1064.
3) Geoff Clark. “Ceremony for Hero Will Note 1865 Feat.” Orlando Sentinel.
July 16, 1995.
Jovida Fletcher. “Johnson Hopes to Preserve Heritage of Union Soldiers.”
Orlando Sentinel. June 23, 1996.
4) Florida Master Site File OS02790.
5) Ibid.

Those wishing to learn more about the Siege of Petersburg are directed to In the Trenches at Petersburg by noted Civil War historian Earl J. Hess.  I also highly recommend The Siege of Petersburg Online. Brett has created a massive archive of materials related to all aspects of the Petersburg campaign.

To the best of my knowledge there is no regimental history of the 211th Pennsylvania.

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In Memory: Lieutenant Jerry Doyle Blinded During Korean War

Any person who walks cemeteries for any length of time can tell you about
interesting finds. These finds do not always occur in the old sections or in
cemeteries deemed “historic.” The headstone of Jerry Doyle, a soldier blinded during the Korean War, is certainly one of
those that demanded a look into the man’s life.

Jerry Doyle Blinded Korean War Lieutenant
Jerry Doyle headstone located in Oakdale Cemetery, DeLand, FL

 

Jerry Doyle was born on September 17, 1928 to parents James V. and Nora C.
Doyle in the town of DeLand, Florida. He was the fourth of what would be ten
children. At the time, DeLand was home to around 5,000 residents.

Doyle attended local schools and graduated from DeLand High School in 1946, the
same year he registered for the draft. His 1946 draft card states he stood 5’ 8” and
weighed 135 pounds with brown hair, blue eyes, and a ruddy complexion.

Young Doyle was to attend classes at the University of Florida before receiving his
call to active duty with the rank of First Lieutenant, serving in the 40th Infantry
Division.

 

 

Major General Joseph P. Cleland led the 40th Infantry Division, often called the

Courtesy: U.S. National Guard. “The Sunshine Division in Korea.”
https://www.nationalguard.mil/Resources/Image-Gallery/HistoricalPaintings/Heritage-Series/Sunshine-Division-in-Korea/.

Sunshine Division, for much of the Korean War. The troops of the 40th were deployed to Japan in the spring of 1951 for training. In January 1952, the 40th relieved the men of the 24th Infantry Division. They were to serve during the hard fighting at Heartbreak Ridge and at the “Punchbowl” as the war came to an armistice in 1953.

Doyle served faithfully during the war. He was wounded severely in January 1953, during action around the “Punchbowl” when the jeep he was riding in was struck by enemy fire. Lt. Doyle lost his right eye, received a penetrating wound of the brain and a compound fracture of the skull because of the attack. A newspaper report of the time stated that in his present condition, Doyle was satisfactory. It was uncertain how long he would need to remain hospitalized and that he would be removed from his Tokyo hospital room to a facility in the United States as soon as practicable.

Doyle received the Purple Hear in recognition of his injuries.

The seriousness of his injuries led to a prolonged period of recovery. In mid February 1953, the army transferred Doyle back to the United States and he received further treatment at the Travis Air Base Hospital in Fairfield, CA. Later that year he was still hospitalized, receiving a short-term release from the VA Hospital in Hines, IL in order to visit his parents over the holidays.

In what must have been a proud moment, On June 1, 1954, James V. Doyle was
able to initiate his son Jerry into the Veterans of Foreign War, in a meeting held at
the Knights of Pythias Hall.

Jerry Doyle obituary photo

Despite his injuries, Jerry Doyle was to live a long and productive life. His
obituary touted his work with the American Legion, his love of family, and the joy he took in listening to University of Florida football games. In his obituary, Jerry is remembered as expressing no regret over his service or resulting blindness. Military service was what he had to do at the time.

He passed away on December 23, 2016 at the age of 88. Lt. Jerry Eugene Doyle is buried in Oakdale Cemetery, in DeLand, FL.

 

 

 

Sources:

DeLand Sun News. January 20, 1953; February 15, 1953; September 13, 1953;
November 23, 1953; May 31, 1954.

Historical Marker Database. 40th Infantry Division Korean War Memorial.

Orlando Sentinel/Legacy obituary.

U.S. Census 1930 and 1940.

U.S. Korean War Casualties Listing 1950-1957.

U.S. National Guard. “The Sunshine Division in Korea.”

U.S. World War II Draft Cards 1940-1947.

To learn more about the Korean War I recommend The Korean War written by Max Hastings or The Coldest Winter written by Douglas Brinkley. Both are a solid starting point for learning about the Korean conflict.

Korean War written by Max Hastings

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In Memory: Staff Sgt. William Lee Owen Brown KIA Vietnam

William Lee Owen Brown KIA during the Vietnam War. His remains are buried in Oakdale Cemetery in DeLand, FL.
William Lee Owen Brown headstone, Oakdale Cemetery, DeLand, FL

Staff Sergeant William Lee Owen Brown was killed in action (KIA) on February 10, 1968. Enemy fire struck the C-130 Brown was a passenger on as they approached the Khe Sanh airfield during the Vietnam War. The damaged plane was able to land but did not stop safely, running off the end of the runway, exploding in flames. Five of the ten passengers escaped the burning wreckage and received treatment at the US Army hospital.

Brown was born January 20, 1934 in DeLand, FL where he attended public schools. Brown  joined the Marine Corps in June 1953. He attended military photography schools at Fort Monmouth, NJ and Tokyo, Japan. His many USMC roles included that of recruiter, a drill instructor at Parris Island, NC, and at the time of his death, he served as a non-commissioned officer in charge of the First Marine Air Wing Photo Lab.

During his career Sergeant Brown was awarded multiple decorations. Brown received the Good Conduct Medal, the National Defense Ribbon, was a six-time recipient of Expert Rifleman awards, the Navy Commendation Medal with Combat (V), Air Medal and Combat Aircrew Insignia with three stars.

 

 

William Lee Owen Brown KIA during the Vietnam War. His remains are buried in Oakdale Cemetery in DeLand, FL.
Military headstone for William Lee Owen Brown, KIA during the Vietnam War.

At the time of Brown’s death, his wife Pauline (Kerr), son Hugh William, and daughter Karen Denise, lived in Albany, New York. His mother Emma Lee Brown lived in DeLand. Robert Owen Brown, William’s father, predeceased him.

Sergeant William Lee Owen Brown, who was KIA during the Vietnam War, is buried in Oakdale Cemetery, in DeLand, FL.

The Vietnam War is a controversial and complex topic. I recommend a  subscription to the bi-monthly Vietnam magazine.

Sources:

DeLand Sun News

For readers interested in military burials located in Oakdale Cemetery, I invite you to read my blog post about Sergeant Adam Quinn, who perished while serving in Afghanistan.

 

Last Stand at Khe Sanh written by Gregg JonesIn a remote mountain stronghold in 1968, six thousand US Marines awoke one January morning to find themselves surrounded by 20,000 enemy troops. Their only road to the coast was cut, and bad weather and enemy fire threatened their fragile air lifeline. The siege of Khe Sanh-the Vietnam War’s epic confrontation-was under way.

To learn more about Khe Sanh, I recommend readers to Gregg Jones, highly regarded work, Last Stand at Khe Sanh: The U.S. Marines’ Finest Hour in Vietnam. With positive reviews from Leatherneck Magazine, Vietnam Magazine, Michigan War Studies Review, and more, this book will take you into the heat of battle and put you on the frontlines with the men who fought there. 

 

 

 

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Vietnam

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Moses Harshaw Died and Gone to Hell

Moses Harshaw
1794-1858
Died and Gone to Hell

Moses Harshaw Died and Gone to Hell
Moses Harshaw–The Meanest Man Alive
Died and Gone to Hell

The stories and legends surrounding Moses Harshaw are plentiful. One thing we know is that if you visit Old Clarkesville Cemetery in Clarkesville, Georgia, you can see a headstone the likes of which you have probably not seen before. It is both funny and sad at the same time. Funny in that somebody appears to have had the last laugh on Harshaw. Sad in the fact that this person was so evil that family chose to remember him in this way. Moses Harshaw–Died and Gone to Hell.

Moses Harshaw was born in 1794 in North Carolina. He wed Nancy England on June 9, 1814 in Burke County, North Carolina. By 1820, it appears that the Harshaw family was gaining wealth, as they owned seven male slaves, all under the age of 44.

At some point in the early to mid-1820s, Moses led the Harshaw family from their home in North Carolina to new lands in the Nacoochee Valley of Georgia. In 1825, Moses purchased 250 acres from W. B. Wofford for the sum of $1,500. It was on this property that around 1837 Moses would build what is now known as the Harshaw-Stovall House, a property that in 1984 was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Harshaw was successful in a financial manner. In addition to his farming and gold mining
operation, he supported his family by working as an attorney in Clarkesville. By 1840, the US
Census shows him owning 18 slaves, 11 females and 7 males. The 1850 US Census lists
Harshaw as owning real estate with a value of $20,000. The Slave Census for the same year
show him having increased his human ownership to 20.

Despite his apparent business acumen, Moses was person few people liked. His antics had earned
him the moniker, “the meanest man alive.” The period of 1829-1844 saw him charged with
assault on seven occasions, being found guilty six times. His cruelty to slaves became legendary.
When he would hitch his wagon to go to town, he would require the services of a slave on the
trip. He would not allow the slave to ride in the wagon however but would instead tie him to the
back of the wagon and make him run to keep up.

Perhaps cementing his legacy as vile person is the story of when a young slave girl passed away,
Moses wife Nancy purchased a dress for the child to be buried in. When Moses discovered the
expense he demanded the child be dug up, the dress be removed and returned to the store.

Unable to live with Moses and his erratic behavior, Nancy filed for legal separation, which the
courts granted in 1857 (some date this separation as being in 1850). She received several slaves,
farm equipment, and lands in Clarkesville. A portion of the separation agreement reads

from an incompatibility of taste and uncongeniality of temper and disagreement of
pursuits, bickering, heartburnings and strife have discovered that it is impossible they
should longer live together in peace and harmony and have therefore agreed to separate
from bed and board and absolve, release and forever discharge each other from all
conjugal rights, privileges, duties and liabilities, further agreeing to live separate and
apart and abstain in all and every way from interfering with or molesting each other in all
and every way their pursuit of present and eternal happiness.

North Georgia Wine Country Tour. Leaving from Atlanta visit 3 different wineries, including a stop in delightful Helen, GA.
North Georgia Wine Country Tour. Leaving from Atlanta visit 3 different wineries, including a stop in delightful Helen, GA. CLICK HERE or the image for details.

 

Moses was to live only a short while longer, passing away in 1859. Despite being a successful
attorney, Moses passed without a will. The courts appointed Moses son Alonzo and E.P.
Williams as estate administrators. His holdings included 11 slaves, farming equipment, produce,
livestock and feed, household furnishings, a lot and house in the town of Clarkesville, and
considerable acreage and a home in Clarkesville and White Counties.

It is possible that Nancy had the last word on their marriage and the life of Moses Harshaw. The
long rotted original wooden marker was carved with the words “Died and Gone to Hell.” A
replica of the marker stands today, reminding us that our worldly actions may not be forgiven
even in death.

Harshay-Stovall House
Photo courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

Today, visitors to Sautee Nacoochee, GA can stay in the beautifully restored Stovall House. Owners Jeff Sidwell and Erin Fight opened the bed & breakfast in 2019. They offer six rooms (the Terra Cotta Room is pet friendly room) including king-sized beds, private bathrooms, Wi-Fi throughout the house, and more. Water comes from the 350 foot deep well on property. Environmental concerns are taken seriously with kitchen leftovers being composted; leftover soaps, etc. are recycled through Clean the World, the 27-acre property is pesticide free, and cleaning products are eco-friendly. If you are looking for a wedding or event venue, Jeff and Erin are eager to accommodate your needs.

 

References:
Old Clarkesville Cemetery website

United States Census Reports
1820
1840
1850
1850 Slave Schedule

United States Department of the Interior National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form.
Harshaw-Stovall House. June 28, 1984.

 

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Rafting on the Chattooga River near Clayton, Georgia
Here is the perfect opportunity to go rafting in the north Georgia Mountains. Click THIS LINK, or the photo, to book your river rafting excursion on the Chattooga River, near Clayton, Georgia.
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Charles George: Korean War Native American Medal of Honor Recipient

Charles George Monument

Tsali “Charles” George was born August 23, 1932 in Cherokee, North Carolina as a member of
the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Tribe. Charlie, as he was known, attended the Indian School
on the Qualla Boundary of Western North Carolina and spent much of his early life near the
Oconaluftee River.

Charles George
Charles George
Image Courtesy North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

At age 18, with the Korean War in full force, Charlie joined the United States Army in  Whittier, North Carolina, attaining the rank of Private First Class. He served in Company C of the 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division.

In November 1952, PFC George gave his life in order to protect that of fellow soldiers, Armando Ruiz and Marion Santo, who along with George were helping lead an assault to try to capture a prisoner for interrogation, just north of Seoul during the Battle of Songnae-dong. Having succeeded in their mission George, Ruiz, and Santo were ordered to provide cover as the Company retired.

The Chinese were continuing to fight and a grenade landed near the three young men. George pushed Santo away before falling on the live grenade in order to prevent injury and possible death to others. Despite his life threatening injuries George did not utter a sound. To do so would have betrayed their location to the Chinese.

Ruiz and Santo bravely carried the dying George to the nearest aid station but the wounds were too severe and the heroic young Cherokee passed. Both Armando Ruiz and Marion Santo survived the war, returning to the States and leading as normal a life as possible having witnessed the ultimate horror of war.

While in Cherokee County, be sure to make your way over to Murphy. While there you don’t want to miss the Hunter Pyramid. 

Headstone for Charles George
Charles George headstone at Yellow Hill Veterans Cemetery. Image courtesy Findagrave.

The body of Charles George was returned to Cherokee County where he was interred in Yellow Hill Cemetery. You may view an online memorial to PFC George here.

PFC George’s heroics were recognized quickly and in March 1954, George’s parents were invited to Washington D.C. in order to receive the Medal of Honor being awarded posthumously  to their son. In the following years, Charlies father, Jacob, was known to carry the Medal with him, keeping this piece of his son close to him at all times.

 

 

In recent years, further honors have been bestowed upon the memory of PFC Charlie George.
The Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Asheville, NC was renamed the Charles
George Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in 2017 after approval by both the
United States House of Representatives and the Senate.

The bridge crossing the Oconaluftee River in the Yellowhill Community was dedicated as the
Charles George Bridge on January 23, 2014.

Charles George Monument
The Charles George Monument located in the Cherokee Veterans Park. An identical monument sits at the VA Center named in his honor.

On September 24, 2016, a life-sized statue of George, sculpted by artists James Spratt, was unveiled at the Charles George VA Medical Center. Center Director Cynthia Breyfogle stated, “The legacy of Charles George was, and still is, an inspiration and influence beyond his local community. His courage and example join those of other brave men and women, past and present, who have answered the call when their country needed them.”

Unfortunately, Mr. Spratt did not live to see the unveiling. He passed away the day of the unveiling while under hospice care. Warren Dupree of the American Legion Post 143 said a few words on behalf of Spratt, “…he wanted to thank the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Charles George Memorial Project Committee for their kindness in helping him make his dream come true.”

On November 11, 2016, an identical sculpture to the one located at the VA Center was unveiled in a moving ceremony at the refurbished Cherokee Veterans Park.

The Museum of the Cherokee Indian opened an exhibit in George’s honor on Memorial Day, May 28, 2018. The impressive displays included a bronze bust of George, the flag that draped his coffin, his numerous military medals including his Medal of Honor, and a copy of the text of his Medal of Honor citation. You may read this citation below.

Citation:

Pfc. George, a member of Company C, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and
outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy on the night
of 30 November 1952. He was a member of a raiding party committed to engage the enemy and
capture a prisoner for interrogation. Forging up the rugged slope of the key terrain feature, the
group was subjected to intense mortar and machine-gun fire and suffered several casualties.
Throughout the advance, he fought valiantly and, upon reaching the crest of the hill, leaped into
the trenches and closed with the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When friendly troops were
ordered to move back upon completion of the assignment, he and two comrades remained to
cover the withdrawal. While in the process of leaving the trenches a hostile soldier hurled a
grenade into their midst. Pfc. George shouted a warning to one comrade, pushed the other
soldier out of danger, and, with full knowledge of the consequences, unhesitatingly threw himself
upon the grenade, absorbing the full blast of the explosion. Although seriously wounded in this
display of valor, he refrained from any outcry which would divulge the position of his
companions. The two soldiers evacuated him to the forward aid station and shortly thereafter he
succumbed to his wound. Pfc. George’s indomitable courage, consummate devotion to duty, and
willing self-sacrifice reflect the highest credit upon himself and uphold the finest traditions of the
military service.

Sources:

https://asheville.va.gov/
https://www.cmohs.org/recipients/charles-george                                                                  https://www.ncdcr.gov/blog/2014/11/30/cherokee-charles-george-korean-war-medal-of-honor-recipient   https://www.theonefeather.com

To learn more about the Medal of Honor I recommend Medal of Honor, Revised & Updated Third Edition: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty  

 

 

 

 

 

To learn more about the Cherokee Indian Nation I recommend Trail of Tears: The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation.

 

 

 

 

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Great Smoky Mountains area trip ideas
Are you visiting the Great Smoky Mountains area? Click THIS LINK or the image above for great ticket and tour opportunities.