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Sites in Bowman Georgia Worth Visiting

Bowman Georgia Famous Little Police Station Sites to See in Bowman Georgia

Bowman, Georgia

Bowman, Georgia is a small town located in Elbert County in the northeast portion of the state. The town boasts a population of around 900. Bowman is located between the towns of Elberton and Royston along Georgia State Route 17. Elberton is known by the nickname of the “Granite Capital of the World.” Royston is famous for it’s association with Hall of Fame baseball player Ty Cobb. If you are driving State Road 17 in Georgia do not miss these sites in Bowman Georgia that are worth visiting.

To read my review of the book Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beautyclick HERE.

Thomas Jefferson Bowman and the growth of the Elberton Air Line Railroad in the 1870s led for the formation of the city of Bowman. The Georgia General Assembly incorporated the city in 1907. John Judson Brown, was elected the first mayor of Bowman in 1910. Brown would later serve as the Commissioner of Agriculture in Georgia and founded the Georgia Farm Market Bulletin.

After the turn of the twentieth century, four trains made daily service to Bowman. The then thriving community was home to two blacksmith shops, two barber shops, a harness store, livery stable, hotel, and several mills. Baptist and Methodist churches provided for the spiritual needs of residents.

Much of the history of Bowman, GA can be found through this interesting 1938 footage. This is on the University of Georgia Brown Media Archives page.

In 2009 the Building at 6 and 7 Public Square was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its significance in architecture as an excellent representation of commercial buildings in small towns during the early 20th century. The building is also deemed important in the field of commerce as it served as home to numerous business from its construction date in 1908 through the middle of the 20th century. Business types included a brickyard, gin, shoe and harness shop, blacksmith, lumber yard, bank, drug store, grocery, and telephone company.

The National Register of Historic Places added the Bowman Commercial District to its listings in 2016. The completed nomination form does not appear to be available online yet.

Today, Bowman plays host to two large, yearly festivals, the Big Iron Crank Up, held in the spring and the Bowman Fall Festival held in October.

My wife and I have driven through Bowman on several occasions on our way a bit further north. The last time through my wife was driving and I had her stop so I could take a few photos.

Stop at the corner of SR17 and SR172 to view interesting sites you will only find in Bowman, Georgia.

 

 

Sites to See in Bowman Georgia Famous Little Police StationLittle Police Station

The first place to visit is the City of Bowman’s Famous “Little Police Station.” Bowman doesn’t make claim to having the world’s smallest police station, but this would probably give most a serious run for the money.

Measuring only several feet square with a single door, the station is located adjacent to the railroad tracks.

If you are interested in finding the world’s smallest police station, you’ll have to drive south, to Carabelle, Florida. Located at the corner of US 98 and CR 67 is the world’s smallest. Read more about the Carrabelle police station/phone booth using THIS LINK.

 

 

Bowman Georgia Famous Little Police Station Sites to See in Bowman Georgia

 

 

Small police station claims are also made by

Ridgeway, South Carolina

Britain’s Smallest Police Station

 

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Mecole Hardman, Jr.

Every small town seems to have the high school athlete that is just better than everyone around them. For Bowman, that young man is Mecole Hardman, Jr. A rather prominent sign proclaiming his ties to the town is located a very short distance from the little police station.

Hardman had a standout college career at the University of Georgia, where in addition to playing wide receiver, he also returned kicks. Hardman opted out of his senior year of college eligibility. He was drafted in the second round of the 2019 draft by the Kansas City Chiefs. Playing alongside superstar quarterback Patrick Mahomes, Hardman made 151 catches in less than four years (due to injury) and ultimately was part of two Super Bowl winning teams.

After the 2022 season Hardman became a free agent and in March 2023, signed with the New York Jets. In October 2023, Hardman was traded to the Kansas City Chiefs, reuniting him with the team where he had his greatest success. In February 2024, Mecole Hardman caught the Super Bowl winning touchdown pass from Patrick Mahomes.

Sites to see in Bowman Georgia. Home of Mecole Hardman welcome sign.

Super Bowl hero Mecole Hardman talks about playing in the Super Bowl, starting the season with the Jets and ending the season with the Chiefs, who was the craziest at the after party, Post Malone performing, blacking out when he scored the game winning touchdown, the play that they called, growing up in Bowman, Georgia, and the parade.

 

Bowman Area Veterans Memorial

This unique monument with W for World War I and II, a K for the Korean Conflict, and V for Vietnam is;

Dedicated to the glory of God and all veterans of the Bowman Community, more especially to these who have given their lives for our nation’s cause.

Listed are the names of seventeen men from the Bowman area who gave their lives while in service. I am currently working on a more detailed post/s for these men and will link from here once complete.

Listed below, are the names on the monument. If known, I have referred as to the war these men perished in. When possible, I have linked names to online memorials.

 

Jimmy Lee Almond   Korea (his correct name is Jimmie)

Joe Robert Burton             World War II

Lloyd George Burton         World War II (killed in a flight training accident at Cecil Field)

Ouitman Bone Drake      World War II (his correct name is Quitman)

Robert Edward Echols        Vietnam

Edison H. Lunsford    post World War II

Samuel T. Martin       currently unknown

Benjamin M. Maxwell        World War II (see HERE also)

Hugh Hall Maxwell               World War II (see HERE also)

Charles C. Mayfield           Vietnam

Dorsey A. Pulliam     World War II (killed in airplane accident at Smyrna Army Air Field in Tennessee)

Julian Pulliam            World War II

Charles Stakley Roberts, Jr.         World War II (see HERE also)

George Henry Rousey      1960 (killed in a single car accident in Hampton, Virginia)

Clifford Farris Rucker      World War II (see HERE also)

Thomas Gary Sikes        Vietnam

James Fletcher Webb           World War II (see HERE also)

 

Samuel Johnson Verner marker, one of the sites in Bowman Georgia that are worth seeing.To the side of the main memorial is a flat stone dedicated to World War II veteran Samuel Johnson Verner who passed away at the age of 76 in 1989. Verner is buried at Lavonia-Burgess City Cemetery in Franklin County, GA.

Dorsey Alexander Pulliam and Julian Pulliam were brothers.

Lloyd George Burton and Joe Robert Burton were brothers.

I have not confirmed the relationship Hugh Hall Maxwell and Benjamin Martin Maxwell. They may or may not have been related.

Please share any information on any of these service members, especially photos or memories. As I put together individual posts about these men, I will include your histories. You will receive full credit for any materials shared.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. Affiliate programs or sponsors providing products do not influence the views and opinions shared on this blog.

 

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Book Review–Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty

Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty book cover

Book Review—Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty

Ty Cobb A Terrible Beauty biography written by Charles Leerhsen.

Leerhsen, Charles. Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty. New York: Simon and Schuster. 2015. ISBN 9781451645798 (paperback). $18.99. Index, b/w photos. 449 pages, 404 pages of text.

 

 

Winner of the Casey Award for Best Baseball Book of the Year as awarded by Spitball: The Literary Baseball Magazine, Ty Cobb, A Terrible Beauty is a book all baseball fans and historians should read.

 

Ty Cobb--courtesy Library of CongressTy Cobb A Terrible Beauty written by Charles Leehrsen
Ty Cobb–Courtesy Library of Congress

On the Mount Rushmore of baseball immortality, you will find Ty Cobb, the Georgia Peach. When your career batting numbers include lines such as 4,189 hits, twelve batting titles, a career .366 batting average, and nearly 1,000 stolen bases, immortality is yours. In Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty, author Charless Leehrsen takes on the monumental task of rehabilitating Cobb’s tarnished legacy.

Along with his batting prowess however, Cobb has another reputation that is not so glamorous. It is this reputation for fighting, having a short temper, being cheap, claims of his being a dirty player, and racism that former Sports Illustrated editor, Charles Leerhsen attempts to combat in his revisionist biography of Cobb. As reviewer John Williams stated in the New York Times with the books release, “Cobb’s image is not a fixer-upper; it’s a Superfund site.”

 

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Cobb A Biography by Al Stump Ty Cobb A Terrible Beauty Leerhsen has a major bone to pick with Al Stump. Stump, a man with a not so clean reputation himself, was the co-author of Cobb’s autobiography My Life in Baseball, and then more scathing works in True magazine and later the book, Cobb: The Life and Times of the Meanest Man Who Ever Played Baseball, and comes in for repeated criticism, some of it deserved, from Leerhsen. The movie Cobb, based upon Stump’s work is given its share of criticism as well. In his note on sources he states the movie “was no help at all.”

In A Terrible Beauty, we learn of the difficulties Cobb had when breaking into professional baseball. The bullying and hazing of the day are things I hope would never be tolerated in locker rooms today. Some of it bordered on what might be called criminal. Cobb also had to deal with the murder of his father. A murder committed by his mother under mysterious and questionable circumstances.

While Cobb did have many difficulties, these do not allow a biographer to excuse away in any manner Cobb’s actions. He would fight seemingly anyone; from teammates and opponents, to umpires, to team staff, hotel workers, and even fans who catcalled him from the bleachers. Cobb’s admitted actions would probably lead to his banishment from the game today and more lawsuits than his lawyers could attend to.

In trying to bolster Cobb’s reputation, Leerhsen is at times not willing to place blame where it seems to belong, at Cobb’s feet. An example are multiple interactions with Bungy Cummings, an African American groundskeeper, who may have had a liking for alcohol.

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In 1906, what looks to have probably started as a harmless interaction between Cummings and Cobb led to a violent fight with teammate Charlie Schmidt. Schmidt claimed to have seen Cobb choking the wife of Schmidt, who was trying to stop Cobb from beating her husband. Leerhsen seems to shake off the episode calling Cummings a drunk. Cobb is forgiven because “It’s worth noting I think [Leerhsen is the I] that he [Cobb] didn’t claim that beating up Cummings and his wife was permissible because there were Negroes who had become too familiar or aggressive (as is sometimes alleged or suggested); what he said, rather, was that he did not beat them up.” This is a claim that seems most improbable. Schmidt is condemned as a man who had fought with Cobb on at least two prior occasions, thus seemingly making him in the wrong by default.

Cobb is deemed to have not been racist for his praise of stars such as Willie Mays. In 1952, regarding Black players in Major League Baseball, Cobb stated, “The Negro should be accepted and not grudgingly but wholeheartedly.” Easy for him to have said twenty-four years into retirement and five years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Would a Georgia born and bred Cobb have made such a comment during his playing days?

So, what do we make of Leerhsen’s book? Well, first, I have several editorial complaints that should in no way reflect upon Leerhsen, his research, or the text of this book. First is the lack of a formal bibliography. This is a massive oversight on the part of the publisher. The two page “Note on Sources” that is included is unacceptable. What this “Note” is, is two long unusable paragraphs listing secondary sources. The first paragraph includes works on Cobb (with further bashing of Stump of course.) The second is “Other books I consulted,” a listing of authors and book titles in no conceivable order.

My second issue is what pass for endnotes. Rather than have standard endnotes, what readers are presented with is each chapter receiving a single paragraph of text with page numbers and a very brief comment where material came from.  If this material is not included in the “Note on Sources” you are left even further mystified.  These paragraphs are difficult and not user friendly, nor are they endnotes. I get not having footnotes, though those are most convenient for readers, and I am happy enough to at least have traditional endnotes. This type of notation should be avoided by all publishers.

After reading Leerhsen what am I left with? First, I am left with the nagging feeling I should have read all of Stump’s works prior. Because A Terrible Beauty is so focused on countering much of what has been written about Cobb, a grasp of that literature would have helped.

Secondly, it seems clear that the author has done plenty of research. While a majority seems to come from newspapers, which often have their own slant, Leerhsen is able to combat much of the reputation Cobb has been given (I hesitate to say earned after reading this book.) I would use the reputation for having been a dirty player as an example here. Instances of Cobb being involved in a “spiking” seem to have been rare. Players of the day do not seem to have universally considered him a dirty player. Did you want to have Cobb barreling down on you while stealing a base or stretching a hit? Probably not; does it appear he went out of his way to injure opposing players, no.

I might like to have seen a bit about Cobb’s legacy, especially in the Royston, GA area. Cobb’s burial location is discussed. This is a must see if you are travelling through town.

At the end of the day, who is the real Tyrus Raymond Cobb? Is it the violent, racist, possibly alcoholic of Al Stump; or the more moderate, misunderstood, Cobb of Charles Leerhsen? It is probably somewhere in between, but Leerhsen has done a commendable job in righting some of the past wrongs we have assumed true of Ty Cobb.

You may find all of Charles Leerhsen’s books using THIS LINK.

Bowman, GA is located just a short drive from Royston, GA, where Cobb called home. Here are some sites you should see if you visit Bowman. Use this link for my recommendations.

Woman running in Orthofeet Sneakers

 This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. Affiliate programs or sponsors providing products do not influence views and opinions shared in my posts. 

 


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30 Best Things to do in Daytona Beach Florida

Welcome to Daytona Beach. Image courtesy Volusia County Properties

Thank you for reading. Here you will find the 30 Best Things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida. Whether you are a visitor, a local, or a day tripper, there are many things that the entire family will enjoy. There are no chain locations or food listings. This list is meant to promote locally based attractions and shops. These are places you won’t find in every community or tourist destination. So jump in, and review the 30 best things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida. 

 

Welcome to Daytona Beach. Image courtesy Volusia County Properties
Welcome to Daytona Beach. Image courtesy Volusia County Properties

DAYTONA BEACH

Known as the World’s Most Famous Beach or the home to the World Center of Racing, Daytona Beach has often staked its reputation and future on these two industries. The beach and the speedway are two things that are not going anywhere. They are the rock on which Daytona’s tourism future still stands. Daytona Beach is much more than the beach and NASCAR however. In fact, here are the 30 best things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida.

Yes, there is bike week and Biketoberfest. But, in speaking with longtime observers these events aren’t quite what they used to be. Sure, they bring people to town but the fact is, this is an aging market. It’s a market that has moved outward. This includes as Destination Daytona in Ormond Beach rather than the older hangouts in Daytona. Other cities within easy driving distance are also siphoning off visitors. In addition, bike events are held around the country. It’s not the novelty it used to be. Almost every tourist mecca has these events so Daytona doesn’t have the uniqueness it did many years ago. Bike Week isn’t going anywhere but I am not sure Daytona Beach should stake its name on the event.

Events come and go. Take spring break. Compared to the heydays’, spring break is almost a non-event today. Black College Reunion? The same thing. Today, in addition to the pop-up truck and jeep events that nobody in town other than hoteliers is interested in, the Welcome to Rockville, multi-day heavy metal concert is one of the biggest annual events. Of course, promoters can take their ball and go home any time they feel unloved or that they can get something better out of another town. I don’t foresee this being an event Daytona will hold on to long term without committing public funds. Local businesses seem to love this event and many claim it is their most profitable special event during the year.

A concern many event attenders voice about Daytona  are accommodations. Many buildings have been damaged by hurricanes and have not reopened. Those that are in business are charging what these visitors consider exorbitant rates. It’s not my place to say whether that’s true or not but visitor actions speak loudly.

And while Daytona Beach often has an identity problem, compounded by multiple groups trying to promote and support tourism, don’t be scared away by the revolving door of publicity campaigns or the negativity about some of the seedier areas of the community. Pay attention to your surroundings, use common sense, and just like in any other city, you’ll be fine and have a good time.

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TRAFFIC

Daytona Beach can run the gamut on traffic congestion.

I have been beach side when there is very little traffic. Mind you, that is during off season and during the work week. International Speedway Boulevard from say, Clyde Morris Boulevard to Beach Street is usually pretty busy no matter the time of year. In the vicinity you have a large high school and two colleges, in addition to ISB being a major thoroughfare to beach side. Congestion is inevitable.

During peak season, say March through August/September back to school, weekend driving can be pretty harsh in spots. If you are coming to town during one of the weeks there are races at the speedway, be prepared for major headaches on International Speedway Boulevard and the highways that funnel onto the road. Pay close attention to any of the temporary electronic billboards on the side of the road and keep an eye out for pedestrians, who often don’t think crosswalks apply to them.

During bike week events in March and October, be on the lookout. Traffic can be busy, especially near the Main Street and Destination Daytona areas. Bikers are notorious for riding in wide and deep packs with many not paying attention to larger vehicles. Bikers weaving in an out of traffic is common and making extra lanes is commonplace.

Spring break and certain truck, jeep, and other pop-up events, sanctioned and unsanctioned, can tie up beach side traffic to a point it is at a stop. Many of these people see a need to cruise slowly up and down A1A, causing gridlock on the narrow and heavily stop lighted A1A.

Summer traffic during the weekends can be heavy as the beach is a popular, low-cost way for people to spend the day. Beach entrances are limited and it just takes time to get cars through the toll booths. Just be patient or scout ahead and find some of the off-beach parking lots.

While we are on the topic of traffic, city leaders have a mind that there must always be some type of road construction going on. This is not usually fixing potholes and the like, but rather, some type of project meant to enhance the city image while usually tying up traffic for long periods and often not having the anticipated outcomes. Just shake your head and drive on. The project will be complete in two years when another will be started.

Google maps and a bit of patience are your friends and will get you around the Daytona Beach area.

Personalized Push Pin Travel Maps

WEATHER

The weather in Daytona Beach can be brutal during the summer months. Don’t let the online historical records tell you otherwise. Weather report numbers are recorded at Daytona Beach International Airport and may not be accurate throughout the area.

The NOAA states that from 1991 through 2020 the average high for the year is 80.6 with a low of 62.5. They claim the average high in July is 90.2 and in August is only 89.8. I strongly believe most locals would challenge these numbers as being too low. Daytona Beach is HOT, there is no way around it. Try shorts and t-shirts on Christmas many years hot.

When it comes to precipitation, be prepared, especially if visiting during late spring through the summer months. Violent thunderstorms can come on rapidly and if you are on the beach, lifeguards will be working to safely clear you out. Getting a packed beach safely cleared is an undertaking but the lifeguards to a fine job. The NOAA states Daytona Beach receives an average of 51.25 inches of rain and 119 rainy days per year.

A word on hurricanes and tropical storms. Don’t be the tough guy trying to brave out a storm beach side. If you are in town and there are evacuation notices issued, pay attention. If you are staying beach side, please remember that bridges are locked down after winds reach a sustained 40 mph. You won’t be able to change your mind and leave and EMS will probably not be able to reach you if something bad happens. It’s rare, but keep a watch on the weather if you are visiting during hurricane season.

Here’s a personal story about Daytona Beach weather. I have been to exactly one NASCAR race at DIS. When I worked in trade books, a couple of book reps were in town for February races and had extra tickets and very generously invited me to attend. This was the Saturday race so the grandstands were not full. We were wrapped in coats and freezing. The temperatures were kind of low and the wind was very strong through the grandstands. Despite the cold, the sun was so strong we all left with sunburned faces and necks.

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WHAT TO SEE AND DO IN DAYTONA BEACH

So, you are thinking of visiting Daytona Beach. Maybe you are already in town on vacation and are looking for things to do. Well, here is a list of 30 best things do in Daytona Beach or local activities you should consider. I have provided hyperlinks to official websites or sites with considerable information. It is recommended you check these sites to confirm open hours and associated costs.

What you will not find on this listing are things such as shopping malls, bars, and restaurants. There may be these type activities associated with a few of the items listed but you can find a shopping mall on your own. Chain restaurants, which proliferate in Daytona Beach, can be found on almost any interstate exit. There is nothing unique or interesting about these places and their Daytona Beach franchises are no different. I strongly urge you to seek out local restaurants, bars, coffee shops, and stores. Daytona has a lot of unique opportunities for you to try.

A word about using this list before you start. Many of these locations begin with the name Daytona or Daytona Beach. It can be easy to overlook this part of the listing but you will not want to miss some of these places.

This listing is alphabetical and not in order of favorites or by category. This list includes locations from Ormond Beach to the north through Port Orange and Ponce Inlet to the south. .

Finally, this list is by no means all inclusive. What are some of your favorites that I have not included? Drop me a line or leave a comment.  Do you own or work at a destination I didn’t include? Let me know. Maybe I will update it to 31 things to do. Did you not enjoy one of the places I have listed. Leave a constructive comment and I will approve it for posting.

Now, get to visiting!

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Abraxas Books

256 S. Beach Street

Are you looking for that hard to find title, or maybe something to help pass the time while lying in the sun at the beach? With well over 100,000 titles in stock, Abraxas Books is the place to go.

For full disclosure, I have known Jim, the owner, professionally for well over twenty years. I have purchased hundreds of books from him. He know his books.

Abraxas Books owner Jim Sass and the world famous bookstore cat, Sterling. 30 Best Things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida.
Abraxas Books owner Jim Sass and the world famous bookstore cat Sterling. Image courtesy Abraxas Books.

 

A few words of advice you should heed. Jim loves cats. He enjoys dogs, but cats are the way to go. You are not likely to find James Patterson, John Grisham, or other exceedingly popular mainstream fiction authors on the shelves but you may find them on the carts outside. If you are seeking history, art, photography, philosophy, religious history and theory, classic literature, etc. this is your place.

Do not ask for a discount. Seriously. If you are buying multiple books, I have never not seen Jim take care of a customer. Jim is a straight shooter, widely read, and like most book dealers, is a good judge of character. Jim may be intimidating to some, but I tell you from experience, he is a good person and an asset to Daytona Beach.

Angell & Phelps

154 S. Beach Street

Angell & Phelps has been handcrafting chocolates and other candies since 1925. Watch candy makers at work through large windows and purchase their wares to enjoy later. Free samples are provided.

A must visit if you are strolling along Beach Street. Stop in after visiting Abraxas Books and the Halifax Historical Museum or grab a snack before you see a film at Cinematique.

 

Beach

Most visitors to Daytona Beach come for THE BEACH. With over 23 miles of coastline and nearly 500 feet in width at low tide, much of it drivable, beach goers flock to The World’s Most Famous Beach. Please mind the 10 mph speed limit and watch for kids and those not paying attention. It is recommended to swim near staffed lifeguard stations as rip currents are common. These young men and women are well trained and will be able to assist if you are in danger.

It is illegal to disturb sea turtles, hatchlings, or nests. Seriously, if these are marked or you come across them, don’t press your luck. An additional point, don’t dig and leave holes on the beach. Sea turtles and hatchlings can easily become trapped in your hole. If you or your kids just have to dig, fill it in before leaving.

For beach pricing information please visit Volusia Beach Pass. Multiple options are available and off-site parking can often be found for no cost.

Gourmet coffee line benefiting charity projects around the world

Birthplace of Speed Park

Corner of Granada and A1A in Ormond Beach

Relive the earliest days of beach racing and beach speed time trials The park includes monuments and a recreation of the Ormond Garage. The park is free to visit, and the beach is just a very short walk away. Park in the lot across A1A and walk over.

Calle Grande Arches

Calle Grande Street west of US-1 (Ridgewood Avenue) in Holly Hill

Calle Grande Arches Image courtesy Daytona Beach News Journal
Calle Grande Arches Image courtesy Daytona Beach News Journal

Dating to the mid-1920s, the remains of the Calle Grande Arches are a true site to behold.

William Collins Hardesty was the man behind a proposed development called Rio Vista on the Halifax. Plans called for cottages, a large hotel, a golf course, and a canal for gondola rides. Today, the Riviera Hotel remains from the original development, now as an assisted living facility. The golf course is part of the Riviera Country Club.

The still standing arches, which are located at what was to be the entrance to the grand project, are situated on the banks of a dirty canal. The detail put into these columns is incredible. Painted to look like marble they provide the feel of ancient Rome.

When visiting, please use extreme caution and park well off the road. Calle Grande Street is a known for drivers exceeding the speed limit. In the past, drivers have hit and damaged the columns. Visitors should pay attention to where they are walking when visiting the site. Take nothing but photos and do not touch the arches. The arches are not in the best of condition and can easily be damaged. Also, you don’t want to end up taking a header into the canal.

One final word of warning, I have been told that the homeless often congregate around this area. Deal with them at your own risk.

Casements

25 Riverside Drive in Ormond Beach

Located between the Halifax River and the Atlantic Ocean, the Casements was built in 1913 and was purchased in 1918 as the winter home of John D. Rockefeller.

The property was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. It was purchased by the city of Ormond Beach in 1974 with renovations completed in 1979.

The Casements is now a multi-use facility offering visitor tours, workshops, classes, and special event rentals. Be sure to see the Boy Scout and Hungarian folk exhibits located on the third floor. The annual Ormond Beach Celtic Festival is held close by.

On the grounds, be sure to seek out the small marker placed by the Society of American Travel Writers. Please read my post on this marker by using THIS LINK. There are also two identical two-sided state historic markers for The Casements.

Casements Florida historic marker side 1. 30 Best Things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida.
The Casements, Florida Historic Marker Side 1
Casements Florida historic marker side 2
The Casements, Florida Historic Marker Side 2

Cinematique

242 S. Beach Street

Founded in 1991, the 70-seat theater opened in 2010, providing an art house experience to visitors, showing first run independent, foreign, documentary, and art films that would not be available in Volusia County otherwise. This small theater fills a unique niche and has no comparable location in the county.

Ticket prices are around $10 per person. Limited food and drinks are available. Maybe stop in at Angell & Phelps for your movie snacks.

See the website for programming information and dates.

Daytona Beach International Speedway

1801 W. International Speedway Boulevard

First opened in 1959, the “World Center of Racing” annually hosts some of the largest stock car events in NASCAR, including the season opening Daytona 500. Motorcycle races, concerts, vintage car shows, and an incredible, drive through, Christmas lights display are just a few of the things you’ll find throughout the year at the Speedway.

The speedway isn’t about racing only, however. The facility offers guided tours, the NASCAR Racing Experience, an incredible museum, shopping, and more. The One Daytona shopping center is across International Speedway Boulevard.

Be sure to take the self-guided tour outside the facility, including monuments and the NASCAR equivalent of the Hollywood Walk of Fame. See how your hands measure up against some of the greatest drivers in the world.

 

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Daytona Beach Zipline Adventure 

Image courtesy Daytona Zipline Advenutre. 30 best things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida.
Image courtesy Daytona Zipline Adventure

1000 Orange Avenue at Tuscawilla Park (be sure to take a stop at the World War I monument located close by.)

Two different courses are available allowing visitors to fit their schedule, ability, and budget to the attraction.

Test your skills on ladders, wooden bridges, tight rope cables, and zip lines.

Multiple pricing options are available. It’s about $55 to  take both courses, plan on around 3 hours duration. Check their website for more information.

Daytona Ice Arena

2400 S. Ridgewood Avenue #63D in South Daytona

Who says there isn’t ice skating in Florida? The Tampa Bay Lightning have won two Stanley Cups in recent years and the Florida Panthers are a top hockey team also. Several minor league hockey teams call Florida home. Hockey is no longer a Canadian or northeast exclusive.

OK, so you aren’t ready for the NHL. How about a family friendly option instead? From public skating times, to skating and figure skating lessons, to hockey clinics, you can find it here in a clean and safe indoor environment.

Check the website for times and prices.

Daytona Lagoon

601 Earl Street, located beach side, adjacent to the Ocean Center and the large parking garage. Nearby you will also find the Tourist Church, referenced below.

Located just a block from the beach, Daytona Lagoon has something for every member of the family: thrill slides, pools, go-karts, laser tag, arcade games, mini golf, a sky maze rope course, and more.

The waterpark is of course the main attraction here. It features several fun slides including Kraken’s Revenge, the Shaka Halfpipe, Blackbeard’s Revenge, and more. There is a lazy river, a lagoon pool, and a children’s play area for younger visitors. Life jackets and lifeguards are on site.

The best parking is in the County of Volusia parking garage located adjacent to the park. Parking costs $8 but bring your garage ticket and they will validate your visit and you will pay only $4 to park. That’s a great deal and your car stays cool in the heat of the day.

Visit the website for multiple ticket pricing options.

 

Flea and Farmers Market

1425 Tomoka Farms Road

Open 9a-5p Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, this market, which opened in 1981, features over 1,000 booths and 600 vendors over many acres. From antiques to vegetables to cell phone cases to getting a tattoo, you can find it here. Parking, admission, and people watching are free.

For car enthusiasts, the first Saturday of the month features a Classic Car Cruise In.

Gnome Tree

1037 Riverside Drive in Holly Hill

Started in 2003 by a local couple, the original display of three gnomes at the base of a large oak tree has grown to several hundred gnomes who now “inhabit” the picturesque tree.

They even have a Facebook Page, The Gnomes of Holly Hill, Florida. Want more? There is a short, self published book available as well. Click THIS LINK to find it and purchase your own copy.

Halifax Historical Museum

252 S. Beach Street

Located in the County of Volusia owned, Merchants Bank Building, the Halifax Historical Museum is home to hundreds of items of local interest including artifacts, photos, souvenirs, and family mementos. The bank building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, is a site to see on its own.

Located next to Abraxas Books (see above). Afterwards, stop in at Stavro’s Pizza House located just two doors from the museum.

Parking is free. Museum admission is $10 for adults, under age 12 are free. Closed Sunday and Monday.

 

An overhead view of City Island Ballpark, now Jackie Robinson Ballpark, close to how it looked when future Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson played there.
An overhead view of City Island Ballpark, now Jackie Robinson Ballpark close to how it looked when future Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson played there.

Jackie Robinson Ballpark

105 E. Orange Avenue

Originally opened in 1914 as City Island Ball Park, the present set up of field and seating dates to 1962. The field is currently home to the Bethune Cookman Wildcats baseball team and the Daytona Tortugas, the Cincinnati Reds low A farm team.

The ballpark is named after Hall of Fame player Jackie Robinson. It was in this stadium that he played his first spring training game in 1946. Stadiums in both Jacksonville and Sanford would not allow a mixed-race team to play on their fields and now Daytona Beach holds the honor of having hosted Robinson’s first game.

The ballpark was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.

Learn about the history of Jackie Robinson Day and how it is celebrated in Major League Baseball at THIS LINK.

LPGA International

1000 Champions Drive

Golf lovers have a top-notch reason to visit Daytona Beach. The home course of the LPGA Tour, LPGA International features two, eighteen-hole courses designed by Arthur Hills and Rees Jones.

Also onsite are a three-hole practice course, chipping and putting areas, a driving range, Malcolm’s Bar and Grill, a pro shop, and member only facilities.

Visit the website to book a tee time or learn more about membership.

Looking to play golf around Volusia County? Take a look at my listing of golf courses in the county HERE.

Gourmet coffee line benefiting charity projects around the world

Marine Science Center

100 Lighthouse Drive in Ponce Inlet

Not to be confused with the Marine Discovery Center in New Smyrna Beach, the Marine Science Center, which opened in 2002, is operated by the County of Volusia.

From their website, this remarkable project has allowed Volusia County to stand at the forefront of county government efforts to educate our public about the marine resources of our area and to rehabilitate and release sea turtles and seabirds.

The site includes a nature trail, boardwalk, multiple exhibits, a touch pool that features several types of marine life including rays, and Turtle Terrace, where visitors can witness turtle rehabilitation in process.

In its twenty years of operation the facility has cared for more than 20,000 sea turtles and more than 18,000 birds in addition to hosting more than one million visitors.

Be sure to visit the Ponce Inlet Lighthouse if you visit here (see below for lighthouse information.)

Closed on Monday. Adult admission is $8, seniors $7, children ages 3-12 are $5.

Mary McLeod Bethune House and Grave

Mary McLeod Bethune home Image courtesy National Park Service. 30 Best Things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida
Mary McLeod Bethune home. Image courtesy National Park Service

640 Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune Boulevard

The home was built in 1905 and purchased for Dr. Bethune in 1913 and served as her primary residence until her death in 1955.

The home appears to be temporarily closed for tours. When it reopens guided tours from Foundation employees and student workers are free, but donations are accepted. I took a tour a couple of years ago and the student giving the tour was knowledgeable, friendly, and quite accommodating to our group.

The home was dedicated as a National Historic Landmark in 1975.

Dr. Bethune is buried near the home on the campus of Bethune Cookman University.

This is certainly one of the underappreciated gems of Daytona Beach. Make the time to visit if it is open.

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Museum of Arts and Sciences

352 S. Nova Road

MOAS features many permanent, rotating, and traveling exhibits.

The Charles and Linda Williams Children’s Museum is a favorite for families. Also, a family favorite are the Root Family Museum exhibits including Coca-Cola memorabilia, a train station including two mid-century cars, a collection of teddy bears, and more. Every child will want to see the thirteen-foot-tall giant ground sloth fossil in the Prehistory of Florida gallery.

For adults, the Cuban collection is world renowned. African tribal objects, arms and armor, the gallery of American art, decorative arts, and Chinese art are available. The planetarium will be a hit with both adults and children in your group.

The Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art features perhaps the greatest collection of Florida art in the world. At more than 2,600 pieces the museum does a great job or rotating exhibits.

The museum is open seven days a week. A ticket combination package for MOAS and the Brown Museum is under $20 for adults. Separate pricing is available. A great bargain for art and history enthusiasts. This is without question one of the best museums in the state.

If you only have time for one activity, this is the one I recommend!

Ocean Center

101 N. Atlantic Avenue

The Ocean Center is located adjacent to Daytona Lagoon  and Peabody Auditorium and only a couple blocks from the Tourist Church. There is a parking garage across the street. The Ocean Center has parking on site but there is sometimes a charge, particularly if events are going on.

Conveniently located directly across from the World’s Most Famous Beach, the Ocean Center features an arena that can hold 9,000 people, an exhibit hall with over 93,000 square feet of space, and multiple conference and breakout rooms.

I have included the Ocean Center because it features a large public art collection that may be viewed during open hours. Also on site is the ECHO Gallery, an area of rotating exhibits featuring the ECHO themes; environmental, cultural, heritage, outdoor.

Be sure to take a virtual tour on the facility website.

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens

78 E. Granada Boulevard in Ormond Beach

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens building. Image courtesy of the museum
Image courtesy Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens

Just as World War II came to an end, one artist with a vision, and the people of Ormond Beach, worked together to create something magical.

Artist Malcolm Fraser offered a collection of his life’s work to any town along the east coast of Florida that would create an art museum that paid tribute to veterans. Ormond Beach and her residents rose to the occasion and worked together to create a living monument to creative freedom and equality of all persons, and to commemorate the service of World War I & II veterans who fought valiantly for that ideal.

Today, the newly remodeled and expanded museum offers permanent exhibits, traveling shows, virtual exhibits, and courses of all type.

The Gardens offer native and exotic plants and provide a perfect backdrop for weddings and other celebrations. While touring the Gardens be sure to seek out the military plaques and sculptures.

Open Monday through Friday 10a-4p and weekends noon to four. Admission is free but a $2 donation is recommended. This is one of the best values an art lover will find.

Power Station

Pinewood Cemetery

Main Street across from the Boothill Saloon. The Boothill itself can be quite the destination if you are so inclined. As the saying goes, “Come on in and grab a seat. You’re better off here than across the street.”

Pinewood Cemetery, also known as Peninsula Cemetery, dates to the late 1880s, and contains the final resting spots for many of Daytona Beach’s earliest pioneers including names such as Day, Burgoyne, and Jackson. Military headstones indicate burials of men who fought in several different wars are interred her.

Cemetery hours look to be Monday through Saturday, 8 am-5 pm; closed on Sunday. The walk through the cemetery can be uneven so dress appropriately.

Polynesian Luau

Hawaiian Inn Beach Resort 2301 S. Atlantic Avenue in Daytona Beach Shores

An authentic interactive luau experience featuring hula dancing, flaming knife dancing, and more. Suitable for all ages. Includes an all you can eat tropical meal with dishes such as teriyaki chicken, kalua pork, Hawaiian pizza, multiple side dish options, Pepsi products, and a cash bar.

Current show times are at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. Make your reservations through the website. Tickets look to be about $50 for adults.

Ponce Inlet Lighthouse

Ponce Inlet Lighthouse
Image courtesy Ponce Inlet Lighthouse. 30 Best Things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida.

4931 S. Peninsula Drive in Ponce Inlet

Step back in time and climb 175 feet of fun in the Florida sun at the Ponce Inlet Light Station and Museum! Constructed in 1887, the Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse has guided mariners along the Florida coast for more than 130 years.

Admission is about $7 for adults, with several discount programs available. Climb all 203 steps to the top if you dare. Remember, you have to come back down also. The views are worth it!

Be sure to visit the Marine Science Center if you are at the lighthouse. See the information above.

 

The lighthouse was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1998

Port Orange Sugar Mill

950 Old Sugar Mill Road in Port Orange

Also known as Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens, the property is operated by a not-for-profit corporation and owned by the County of Volusia. Entrance is free and donations are appreciated. Donations benefit the not-for-profit organization and help them with park upkeep.

The property contains dozens of gardens and plants, but the real star of the show is the remains of a 19th century sugar factory that were part of the Dunlawton Plantation. Multiple interpretive panels will guide you through the history of the land and the artifacts you will find onsite. Don’t be surprised if you see a dinosaur or two while you are on the park grounds!

You will often find volunteers onsite who can provide information on the plants and flowers.

Woman running in Orthofeet Sneakers

Southeast Museum of Photography

1200 W. International Speedway Boulevard (on the Daytona State College campus)

One of several excellent art museums in the Daytona area, the Southeast Museum of Photography exhibits, collects, preserves, and interprets photography to facilitate teaching and learning at Daytona State College and enhances the community’s understanding of, and appreciation of culture, history, and photography.

Check the website for current exhibits, dates, times, and special events.

Streamline Hotel

140 S. Atlantic Avenue

Opened in 1940, this is the hotel where NASCAR was born! Once a dilapidated flophouse, the now fully renovated boutique hotel once served as local headquarters for the Women’s Auxiliary Corp during World War II.

Located directly across from the beach, the rooftop bar offers incredible views, or have dinner at the Victory Lane restaurant.

An early postcard image of the Streamline Hotel. 30 Best Things to Do in Daytona Beach, Florida
An early postcard image of the Streamline Hotel

 

Timucua Indian Burial Mound

Corner of S. Beach Street and Mound Avenue in Ormond Beach

For information on the burial mound and the recent efforts to preserve this landmark, please see my blog post using THIS LINK.

Tomoka State Park

2099 N. Beach Street in Ormond Beach

Tomoka is a bird-watcher’s paradise, with over 160 species sighted, especially during the spring and fall migrations. Visitors can stroll a half-mile nature trail through a hardwood hammock that was once an indigo field for an 18th-century British landowner.

The park protects a variety of wildlife habitats and endangered species such as the West Indian manatee. For many visitors however, Chief Tomokie is a highlight of the park.

A boat ramp gives boaters and canoeists access to the river. The park store offers snacks, camping supplies, and canoe rentals.

For overnight stays, the park has full-facility campsites and youth camping.

Learn more about Chief Tomokie by reading my BLOG POST HERE.

Chief Tomokie at Tomoka State Park
Chief Tomokie at Tomoka State Park in Ormond Beach shown in a vintage postcard.30 Best things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida

 

Tourist Church

501 N. Wild Olive Avenue

The Tourist Church, also known as the Seabreeze United Church of Christ and the First Congregational Church, is an historic church located at 501 North Wild Olive Avenue in Daytona Beach, Florida, United States. Built in 1929, it was designed by architect Harry Griffin in the Mission Revival Style of architecture. Today it is an active United Church of Christ congregation.

On October 6, 1995, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

You need to see this church to understand just how interesting it is. From the coquina to the stained glass. It’s worth the stop especially if you are visiting the Ocean Center or Daytona Lagoon. They are very close to each other.

Tourist Church Daytona Beach, FL. 30 Best Things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida
The Tourist Church as depicted in an early 20th century postcard.

 

I hope you have enjoyed the 30 best things to do in Daytona Beach, Florida and that it makes your visit a memorable one. Please let me know of your favorites or places I should add.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products. 

If you are visiting Daytona Beach, make the short drive to Sanford and visit the Central Florida Zoo.
If you are visiting Daytona Beach, make the short drive to Sanford and visit the Central Florida Zoo. Click this link or the image for your “skip the line” tickets.

 

 

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Ray Caldwell: Lightning on the Baseball Field-Literally

Ray Caldwell--Courtesy Library of Congress

Ray Caldwell—Lightning on and off the Baseball Field

The story of pitcher Ray Caldwell is certainly a cautionary tale to the dangers of
overindulgence. While Caldwell, at an athletic 6’ 2” and just under 200 pounds,
may have never been able to use his talents to his best advantage, his name is one
that will live in the legacy of baseball forever. Ray Caldwell, despite his physical prowess, is best know for being struck by lightning during a game.

Ray Caldwell was born in the town of Corydon, Pennsylvania on April 16, 1888.
Ray’s father was absent from the start. His stepfather, Lewis Archer, worked in the
telegraph industry, a field that Ray would find himself working in during off-seasons                                                    and in his years after baseball.

Corydon, PA would be erased from the map in 1965 by intentional flooding from
the Kinzua Dam and Allegheny Reserve.

According to baseball historian Steve Steinberg, Caldwell did not take up the game
of baseball until 1908, signing with a semi-pro team the following year. After a
strong performance on the mound against an all-star team from the Pennsylvania
League, young Caldwell signed his first professional contract, turning pro in 1910.

Ray Caldwell--Courtesy Library of Congress
Ray Caldwell–Courtesy Library of Congress

That year he won 18 games for Mckeesport and caught the eye of New York
Americans scout Arthur Irwin. Irwin signed the 21-year-old pitcher, and Caldwell
made his first start for the New York Highlanders on September 21, 1910. The
young right hander had arrived and looked forward to taking the mound and the
batter’s box in 1911.

Caldwell’s first full season should be seen as a success. Using a fastball that had
zip and a knee buckling curve ball, the young pitcher struck out a career high 145
batters on his way to a 14-win season. At the plate, major league pitching didn’t
intimidate him, and he hit .272 in his limited at bats.

The 1912 and 1913 seasons saw Caldwell dealing with arm injuries though by the
end of the 1913 season, he was showing his old form again.

1914 was a good year for Caldwell, if not for the Yankees overall. Again, pitching
well, Ray ran an impressive record of 17-9 with a 1.94 earned run average, good
for fourth in the league. His five shutouts that season were a career high. While his
pitching was strong, his hitting was suspect, ending with a career low, .195
average, including more strikeouts than hits.

 

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With his career looking up, the inner demons were taking hold during 1914. Ray
loved the big city life of New York City. Ray had a penchant for women and the
bottle. During July, he went missing during a road trip, and racked up team fines
totaling $900 during the season; fines that owner Frank Farrell would rescind in an
effort to keep that talented hurler on his team.

Ray Caldwell was lightning on the baseball field; figuratively and literally after being struck while pitching. Ray Caldwell Courtesy Library of Congress
Ray Caldwell–Courtesy Library of Congress

Despite having signed a contract with the Buffalo Blues of the rival Federal
League, Caldwell was back with the Yankees in 1915 at the then high pay of
$8,000 per season. Despite having little offensive support from the light hitting
Yankees, Caldwell posted an impressive record of 19-16 with a 2.89 ERA for the
1915 season.

During the summer of 1916, Caldwell left his team behind, drawing the ire of the
team and earning a $100 fine and fifteen-day suspension. When this didn’t bring
the pitcher back to the team he was suspended for the remainder of the season.

Caldwell showed up late for the 1917 spring training, sporting a tan and looking in
good shape. The press called him “the Pearl of Panama,” believing he had been
pitching in a league there. Despite pitching well early in the season, Caldwell was
fined and suspended ten days for missing curfew and a game the following day.

When he returned from suspension, Caldwell showed flashes of his brilliance,
pitching 9 2/3 innings of relief to defeat the St. Louis Browns, only to be arrested
later that night, having stolen a ring from a local woman. In August, he was hit
with divorce papers and a request for $100 per month from wife Nellie, who
charged him with abandonment.

Despite a growing mountain of evidence against him, the Yankees resigned
Caldwell for the 1918 season, perhaps in hopes he could regain his early career
magic. In August, he left the team and went to work at Tietjen and Lang Dry Dock
Company, perhaps with the knowledge that being employed in what was
considered an essential industry in the war efforts, he could avoid being drafted.

Abandoning his team yet again was the final straw for the Yankees and in
December he was part of a multi-player deal with the Boston Red Sox. His stint in
Boston was a short one. He was released in July, sporting a 7-4 record. At age 31 it
certainly appeared that Caldwell was done in Major League Baseball.

 

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The Cleveland Indians, led by Tris Speaker came calling and signed the pitcher to
a contract on August 19. His unique contract agreed that on days he pitched, he
should get drunk afterward and not bother reporting the following day. The second
day after a game, he was to report to Speaker and run laps as directed, the third day
he would pitch batting practice, and the following day he would pitch for the
Indians. He won five of six starts for the Indians with a low ERA of 1.71.

With the Indians, Ray had offensive support that he did not have in New York.
During the 1920 season, the first in what many consider the “lively ball era,” the
Indians were led by three 20 game winners, including Caldwell, and earned a spot
in the World Series.

The Indians would emerge victorious in the World Series, but Ray had a dismal
performance in his single game, giving up two runs in only 1/3 of an inning before
being pulled.

Ray’s pitching had become a bit more erratic, and Speaker and the Indians moved
him to the bullpen in 1921. He would be suspended during the season, only to
return and win two straight games. He followed up these wins by being shelled by
the New York Yankees, a game the Yankees won 21-7.

Ray Caldwell’s Major League career was over. Age, inconsistency, injury, and a
reputation for liking the bottle had caught up to him. He would continue to pitch in
the minor leagues, occasionally showing dashes of brilliance, but never brilliant
enough to attract a major league contract.

His final major league record was 134 wins and 120 losses with an ERA of 3.22.
Never a hard thrower he only totaled 1,006 strikeouts. His thirteen-year minor
league career record was 159 wins and 147 losses. In his 23-year combined
professional career, Caldwell won an impressive 293 games. Had he done that in
the majors, he might have a spot in Cooperstown.

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Ray Caldwell Lightning on the Baseball Field; Literally

Caldwell is one of hundreds of players with heaps of talent who for whatever
reason never reach their potential. Most of these players are forgotten to time.
Caldwell, however, is remembered for a freak occurrence of nature during one of
his 1919 appearances.

In August 1919, pitching against the Philadelphia Athletics, Caldwell was on the
mound, having pitched a strong eight innings. With two outs in the ninth, and
teams looking to get out of the bad weather, lightning struck. Literally.

Players hit the ground, Caldwell lay flat on his back, unconscious. Indians’
manager Tris Speaker tried to send Caldwell to the hospital after he came to,                                                              but the pitcher insisted on finishing the game. Which he did, inducing a ground                                                          out to third from A’s shortstop Joe Dugan on the next pitch.

So just what is the truth of this story. There is no doubt that lightning struck
SOMEWHERE near the pitcher’s mound. Where exactly is debatable. Some
claimed it struck a metal railing close to the press box while others claimed it hit
the ground near the mound and sent the hurler flying. Caldwell himself liked to
claim the bolt struck the metal button on his cap, a highly unlikely prospect.

Others on the field back the claim that the bolt hit close by. Catcher Steve O’Neil
had his mask and cap knocked off. Umpire Billy Evans stated he felt a tingle in his
legs.

Perhaps that bolt of lighting is what Caldwell needed. Shortly after this, he pitched
a no-hitter against his former team, the New York Yankees.

Ray Caldwell, who was lightning on the baseball field, passed away on August 19, 1967,                                                at the age of 79 from cancer. His remains are buried in Randolph Cemetery, in Randolph,                                              New York, under a small, unassuming marker with a Masonic symbol. His fourth wife,                                                     Estelle, who passed away in 1992, is buried next to him.

Ray Caldwell was lighting on the baseball field; literally and figuratively.Ray Caldwell's headstone--Courtesy Findagrave
Ray Caldwell’s headstone–Courtesy Findagrave

An online memorial to Ray Caldwell may be found HERE.

 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a
purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect
any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are
never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

Head to the 86th floor with Skip the Line tickets option for the Empire State Building. Take in the amazing New York City skyline. Ticket combinations to the 102nd floor are also available.
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April 15 is Jackie Robinson Day in Major League Baseball

April 15 is Jackie Robinson Day across Major League Baseball

Every year April 15 is Jackie Robinson Day across Major League Baseball, from players, to coaches, to management, to staff, to umpires, they all celebrate Jackie Robinson Day on field, in recognition of the man who “broke the color barrier” in baseball. A single blog post cannot tell the full story of Jackie Robinson. I will supply some recommended sources for those wishing to learn more about not just Robinson the baseball player, but Robinson the man; a man who, at age 53, left us at way too young an age. An online memorial to Robinson may be found HERE.

 

Los Angeles Dodgers tickets are available at great prices by clicking this link.

Each April 15 is a major celebration around Major League Baseball. April 15 is Jackie Robinson Day, a day that players in particular are highly respectful of. So what is Jackie Robinson Day and why is it celebrated on April 15?

April 15 is Jackie Robinson Day across Major League Baseball. Read more about the legend in Blackout. In 1946, Jackie Robinson began his career in what many, particularly in that time, called “organized baseball.” Organized baseball basically meant white baseball and not the Negro Leagues. For those seeking more information on Robinson’s first Spring Training, I highly recommend the book, Blackout: The Untold Story of Jackie Robinson’s First Spring Training written by Chris Lamb. Here, you will learn much about baseball, the racism of the era, and the struggles and successes young Robinson dealt with on his way to being on the 1947 Dodgers roster.

Opening Day in baseball is always a major event and opening day in 1947 was April 15 (thus why Jackie Robinson Day is on April 15.) Jackie Robinson started at first base for the Brooklyn Dodgers that day, going 0-3 at the plate. He did reach on an error and scored the go-ahead run in the bottom of the seventh inning. It may not have been what he and the fans were expecting, but he held his own and showed he belonged with the Dodgers.

For the 1947 season, Robinson hit a very respectable .297 and lead the league in stolen bases with 29 while playing in 151 games. He was justly rewarded at the end of the season, finishing 5th in the Most Valuable Player voting and winning Rookie of the Year. You can find Robinson’s career statistics by click THIS LINK. The Baseball Hall of Fame enshrined Robinson in 1962 after an extraordinary career.

Call Him Jack Throughout his life, Jackie Robinson was more than a baseball player. He was truly a cultural icon. In his post-baseball life, he used his fame in support of Civil Rights efforts and was often seen accompanying Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. King is quoted to Robinson saying, “You have made every Negro in America proud through your baseball prowess and your inflexible demand for equal opportunity for all” You may read more about Robinson’s relationship to the Civil Rights movement HERE. Also recommended is the book, Call Him Jack: The Story of Jackie Robinson, Black Freedom Fighter. 

Major League Baseball retired Jackie Robinson’s number 2 during a pregame ceremony at Shea Stadium on April 15, 1997. In announcing the tribute, Commissioner Selig stated, “In honor of Jackie, Major League Baseball is taking the unprecedented step of retiring his uniform number in perpetuity. Number 42 from this day forward will never again be issued by a major-league club. Number 42 belongs to Jackie Robinson for the ages.”

Players then currently wearing the number were allowed to continue throughout their career but no future players would be allowed to wear the number. The last active player to wear 42 in the Majors was the New York Yankees star reliever and now Hall of Fame member, Mariano Rivera, who retired after the 2013 season.

A listing of the last players for each team to have worn the famous number 42 is below.

Arizona Diamondbacks–never issued

Atlanta Braves–Armando Reynoso (1991-1992)

Baltimore Orioles–Lenny Webster (1997-1999)

Boston Red Sox–Mo Vaughn (1991-1998)

California Angels–Mo Vaughn (1999-2000)

Chicago Cubs–Dave Smith (1991-1992)

Chicago White Sox–Scott Ruffcorn (1996)

Cincinnati Reds–Roger Salkeld (1996)

Cleveland Indians (now Guardians)–Michael Jackson (1997-1999)Detroit Tigers–Jose Lima (2001-2002)

Florida Marlins–Dennis Cook (1997)

Houston Astros–Jose Lima (1997-2001)

Kansas City Royals–Tom Goodwin (1995-1997)

Los Angeles Dodgers–Ray Lamb (1969) (Robinson’s 42 was retired by the team in 1972)

Milwaukee Brewers–Scott Karl (1995-1999)

Minnesota Twins–Michael Jackson (2002)

Montreal Expos (now Washington Nationals)–Kirk Rueter (1993-1996)

New York Mets–Mo Vaughn (2002-2003)

New York Yankees–Mariano Rivera (1995-2013)

Oakland Athletics–Buddy Groom (1996-1997)

Philadelphia Phillies–Toby Borland (1994-1996)

Pittsburgh Pirates–Jason Schmidt (1996-1997)

San Francisco Giants–Kirk Rueter (1996-1997)

St. Louis Cardinals–Jose Oliva (1995)

Seattle Mariners–Butch Huskey (1999)

Tampa Bay Rays-never issued

Texas Rangers–Marc Sagmoen (1997)

Toronto Blue Jays–Xavier Hernandez (1989)

Jackie Robinson Day was first celebrated in 2004 at Shea Stadium in New York  with the Mets being host to the Los Angeles Dodgers. Dignitaries at the event included Robinson’s widow Rachel, President Bill Clinton, and Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig.

In 1997, the 50th anniversary of Robinson’s breaking the color bearer in Major League Baseball, Ken Griffey, Jr., with the support and backing of the Robinson family, asked Commissioner Selig for permission to wear number 42 in honor of Robinson. With permission granted, Griffey also wore his game socks in the same manner of the retired legend.

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Chandler Bats CB26

from: chandler bats

 

For the next decade the only players to wear 42 were those grandfathered in. Griffey again approached the commissioners office in 2007 for permission to wear the retired number in recognition of the 60th anniversary of Robinson’s first appearance.

Selig took the request under serious consideration and came back with the offer of allowing all players to wear the number. More than 200 players and coaches honored Jackie Robinson during the first year of the celebration.

Now, each season, April 15 is a date looked forward to on the schedule as all players wear number 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson and his contributions not just to baseball, but to his country. Teams pay special tribute at the start of games. The faces of players, coaches, and fans, show just how much the day means to them.

With the progress that has been made, and with the knowledge that equality is still a work in progress, April 15, Jackie Robinson Day, is one of the most important days in the baseball season.

 

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April 15, Maor Leage Baseball Celebrate Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium.
Celebrate Jackie Robinson Day, or any other day, with a trip to Dodger Stadium. Find your tickets by clicking the image above or THIS LINK.
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Frank Fanovich Major League Baseball Player New York City Police Officer: In Memory

Frank Fanovich

Frank Fanovich       

Frank Fanovich lived a life many boys have dreamed of. Frank Fanovich became a major league baseball player and then served as an officer with the  New York City police department.

On January 11, 1923, in the Bronx, NY, Frank and Mary Fanovich welcomed the birth of their son, Frank Joseph. The eleventh was a beautiful, winter New York day with the high temperature reaching 34 degrees Fahrenheit. Overnight temperatures fell to 25 degrees Fahrenheit. No snow fell on the city that day. It was without doubt a blessed day in the Bronx.

RMS PannoniaFrank Fanovich Major League Baseball Player
RMS Pannonia

Frank, Sr. was born in Pesino, Italy on November 27, 1892. He was five feet, eight inches tall, and weighed 161 pounds. His hair was brown, he had gray eyes, and a fair complexion. He worked as a chauffeur. On August 24, 1912 he arrived at the Port of New York aboard the RMS Pannonia, set to start a new life in a new country, one full of opportunity. On March 8, 1927, married and with a young son, his Naturalization papers were submitted.

As a boy, Frank, Jr. played sandlot baseball and grew to love, and become good at, the game. Later in life he was to play professional baseball, reaching the pinnacle, the Major League, if only for a short period of time.

While it appears, Frank did not complete high school, his World War II Draft Card and his enlistment records show him working for Phelps Dodge as a skilled lineman and serviceman. Frank was a tall and lanky young man, standing six feet tall and weighing 160 pounds. He had brown hair and eyes with a ruddy complexion and a scar on his right cheek.

As a member of the “Greatest Generation,” Frank proudly served his country during World War II. He enlisted in the United States Army on November 25, 1942, in New York City as a private in the Signal Corps. His enlistment was “for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law.” Frank provided his service stationed in England. Private Fanovich returned to the United States aboard the Queen Mary, docking in New York City on July 11, 1945.


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Shortly after arriving home, Frank, Jr. married his childhood sweetheart, Yolanda Franco, who often went by the name Gloria, on February 2, 1946, in Kingsbridge, Bronx. The happy couple were married for 65 years before Frank’s passing on August 27, 2011. Yolanda and Frank do not appear to have had any children, as none were mentioned in Franks obituary.

Shortly after exchanging their nuptials, “Lefty,” as Frank was nicknamed, was signed by the New York Giants as an amateur free agent. The young copule hitched their immediate futures to the whims of the baseball gods; i.e. managers, general managers, owners, and the talent in Frank’s left arm. He played for three different teams during the 1946 season, bouncing between the B and C minor league levels.

In 1947, Fanovich was sent/traded to the unaffiliated Watertown Athletics of the Border League; a team on the C level. Pitching in twenty-three games Fanovich compiled a 16-3 record and recorded a 2.85 earned run average. Playing in multiple positions as required, he played in a cumulative 59 games that season, In 99 at bats he legged out 32 hits for an impressive .323 batting average. Fanovich showed no power as a hitter with only three extra base hits, all doubles.

Frank Fanovich major league baseball player and later an officer with the New York City police department
Frank Fanovich major league baseball player with the Cincinnati Reds organization. Photo courtesy Baseball Reference

The Cincinnati Reds saw something they liked in the young pitcher and purchased his contract from Watertown, assigning him in 1948 to their AAA affiliate in Syracuse. For the Chiefs, he produced mixed results, compiling a 9-13 win/loss record for a team with an overall record of 77-73. While Fanovich struck out 120 batters, he struggled with control, walking 110. In a different era of baseball, the young pitcher threw thirteen complete games. With the stronger level of pitching, Franks batting numbers plunged. He hit only .219 in 64 at bats.

Things were looking up for the twenty-six-year-old pitcher as the 1949 season began. He made the roster for the Cincinnati Reds pitching out of the bullpen. He had been a starter during his minor league career but a chance in the majors was too good to overlook.

The season was not what the Reds and Fanovich might have hoped. Fanovich appeared in 29 games, compiling an 0-2 record with no saves, and a 5.40 earned run average. In only 43 innings pitched he logged 27 strikeouts and 28 base on balls. In his defense, the 1949 Reds were a poor team, finishing the season with a dismal 62-92-2 record. Fan support is what might be imagined for a team with a record like this. They finished with the lowest home attendance in the National League at just under 708,000 at Crosley Field.

With a not so grand start to his Major League career, Fanovich found himself back in the minors for the 1950 season, playing for the New York Giants AAA team, the Minneapolis Millers. Despite Fanovich providing an underwhelming 7-12 record, the Millers finished a league best 90-64. An amazing 24 players from the team spent some time in the Majors including Baseball Hall of Fame member Hoyt Wilhelm who led the team with fifteen wins.

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Frank Fanovich major league baseball player and New York City police officer
Frank Fanovich major league baseball player courtesy Findagrave 

Fanovich led a journeyman’s lifestyle for the next couple of years, bouncing around the minors, playing for four different teams before landing back in the Majors in 1953 with the Philadelphia Athletics. For Fanovich the results were much the same as in 1949. In his first game pitching for the A’s, he faced three batters, walking all of them. Pitching in only 26 games he compiled an 0-3 record and an earned run average of 5.55. His control had still not come around, issuing 37 bases on balls to go with only 37 strikeouts. The Athletics were to remain in Philadelphia for only one more season before moving to Kansas City.

The final two years of Frank Fanovich’s baseball career were spent in Richmond and San Antonio in the minor leagues. His stint in San Antonio at the AA level may have been the best of his career. He put up a 14-11 record, a 3.47 earned run average, while striking out 118 and walking only 97. His 210 innings pitched were a career high. He pitched eleven complete games including four shutouts. At age 32 it was a great way to leave the game that he had given so much to.

Fanovich posted a career MLB record of zero wins and five losses in 55 career games. His earned run average was 5.49. Fanovich was to fare better in the minors, compiling a 73-74 career win/loss record including 52 complete games. As might be expected, some minor league statistics from the period are incomplete or unavailable so it is not possible to make a full assessment of his success.

After retiring from baseball, Fanovich went on to a successful career with the New York City Police Department, eventually joining the Manhattan North Narcotics Division. He would work for NYPD for 27 years before he and Yolanda would retire to New Smyrna Beach in 1987.

In his retirement years, Frank enjoyed a good game of golf, often on the Hidden Lakes course near where he and Yolanda lived. He also retained his love of baseball, keeping up with his beloved New York Yankees.

 

After having led a full life, Fanovich passed away on August 27, 2011 at the age of 88. His remains are interred at Sea Pines Memorial Gardens in Edgewater, FL, in the All-Faiths Mausoleum.

Frank Fanovich was a major league baseball player and later officer with the New York City police department. Frank and his wife Yolanda are interred at Sea Pines Cemetery in Edgewater, FL in the All Faiths Mausoleum.
Frank & Yolanda Fanovich are interred in the All Faiths Mausoleum at Sea Pines Memorial Gardens in Edgewater, FL

An online memorial to Frank Fanovich may be found HERE. A memorial for Yolanda Fanovich may be found HERE.

Frank Fanovich was as major league baseball player and New York City police officer, living the dream of millions of boys and young men.

To read the stories of other Major League Baseball players associated with Volusia County, click HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

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Play Golf in Volusia County Florida on Your Vacation

LPGA Hills Course Hole 8

Where to Plan your Golf Vacation in Volusia County, Florida

Are you planning your vacation to Volusia County? Maybe you will be visiting for one of the NASCAR races or motorcycle event. You or your children might be attending a convention at the Ocean Center. Perhaps you or a family member attend Stetson University or Bethune Cookman University. Maybe you are looking for the opportunity to drive on the “World’s Most Famous Beach.” Find the best spot for your game and make time to play golf in Volusia County, Florida. 

Whatever your reason for being in Volusia County we welcome you. Now, what do you do if you are a golfer. If you have a few hours there are multiple options available for you to consider so be sure to pack your clubs!

Below is a listing of golf courses located in Volusia County. I have chosen to make this list alphabetical by city and then by course. Here you’ll find an address, website information, and a brief bit on the course/s.

This list should help you find the right course and help you get the most out of your golf game in Volusia County.

Daytona Beach

Play golf in Volusia County, Florida at one of the courses at Daytona Beach Golf Club
Play Golf in Volusia County at one of the courses at the Daytona Beach Golf Club

Daytona Beach Golf Club North                                                          600 Wilder Boulevard                                                    https://www.daytonabeachgc.com/

The North course was designed be Slim Deathridge in 1946. Mr. Deathridge served as Head Professional at the time. The course was rebuilt in 1997. This is a par 72 course with the longest tees being 6,413 yards. This is considered to be the tougher of the two Daytona Beach Golf Club courses.

Book your tee time online, take advantage of the putting green and driving range, sign up for individual instruction, or shop at the pro shop for all your golfing needs or for club repair. Grab a meal at the Sand Trap Bar and Grill.

 

 

Daytona Beach Golf Club South                                                                                                                             600 Wilder Boulevard                                                                                                                                         https://www.daytonabeachgc.com/

The South course was designed by Donald Ross and measures in at 6,229 yards with a par of 71.

Donald Ross Courses Everyone Can Play
Donald Ross Golf Courses Everyone Can Play

Ever wonder what it would be like to play the same golf courses as celebrities such as Tiger Woods, Gary Player, Mark O’Meara, and even Babe Ruth? A celebrity in his own right, Donald Ross created many of the best golf courses ever designed. Here is the definitive collection of golf courses in the United States created by Ross, the most prolific and renowned golf course designer of all time. Paul and B. J. Dunn have collected all the information you need in order to find and play the more than one-hundred public, semi-private, and resort golf courses in the United States, all designed by Ross.

Get your own copy of this beautiful book HERE!

 

 

 

 

LPGA Hills Course Hole 8, one of the premier locations to play golf in Volusia County, Florida.
The Eighth hole on the LPGA Hills course

LPGA International Hills Course                                                           1000 Champions Drive                                                                 https://lpgainternational.com/

Playing just under 7,000 yards, the Arthur Hills designed course is a par 72 that has been rated 4 stars by Golf Digest. Hills designed this course around nature. As such it features wetlands, pine trees, and water hazards.

Memberships are available at multiple levels. Practice with ten target pins or on the six putting greens, several with sand bunkers allowing for additional practice opportunities. Book your tee time online and enjoy a delicious meal at Malcolm’s Bar and Grill.

 

 

LPGA International Jones Course                                                                                                                            1000 Champions Drive                                                                                                                                         https://lpgainternational.com/

The Rees Jones designed course is considered a favorite among touring professionals. This 7,100-yard, par 72 course is challenging enough to have earned a 4 star distinction from Golf Digest who also named it number six in its 2010 listing of top 50 American courses for women.

Pelican Bay Golf Club                                                                                                                                          350 Pelican Bay Drive                                                                                                                                  https://golfatpelicanbay.com/

Bill Amick designed this 6,800-yard, par 72 course. This course has served as host to two Senior PGA Tour events.

Book tee times online. The practice facility includes target greens, a pitching complex, a practice bunker, driving range and two putting/chipping greens. After a round of golf enjoy lunch at The Pub.

Daytona Beach Shores

Play Golf in Volusia County at this Par 3 course, the Oceans Golf Club, in Daytona Beach Shores.
Oceans Golf Club, a par 3 course in Daytona Beach Shores

Oceans Golf Club                                                                              2 Oceans West Boulevard                                            http://www.oceansgolfclub.com/

This public course is a 13-hole, par 3 course that measures about 1,150 yards. This might be an option if you are pressed for time.

This is a walking course only. Club and bag rental are available.

 

 

 


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DeBary

DeBary Golf and Country Club a great place to play golf in Volusia County.
The DeBary Golf and Country Club, a great place to play golf in Volusia County, Florida

DeBary Golf & Country Club                                                         300 Plantation Club Drive                                                                    https://www.debarycc.com/

This semiprivate course has been rated 4 stars by Golf Digest. At almost 6,800 yards at its longest, this par 72 features water on the 9th and 18th holes. The course is a past US Open qualifying site.

Book your tee time online or sign up for private instructions. A restaurant with an extensive menu is available. You can make restaurant reservations online if you wish.

 

DeLand

Victoria Hills Golf Club                                                                                                                                          300 Spalding Way                                                                                                                                               http://www.victoriahillsgolf.com/

This 7,150-yard course was designed by Ron Garl is located on over 200 acres. The course features both water and sand hazards. Golfweek has called this course among Florida’s top 15 public courses.

Book your tee time online or over the phone. Lessons and personalized instruction are available. Do you have a big event coming up? Consider hosting it onsite. Multiple locations with scenic views are available. Be sure to grab a bite to eat at the Sparrow’s Grille Restaurant.

Deltona

The Deltona Club                                                                                                                                                 1120 Elkcam Boulevard                                                                                                                                      https://thedeltonaclub.com/

Designed by Bobby Weed, this award-winning public course measures just slightly under 7,000 yards and shoots a par 72.

Reserve your tee time online. Golf lessons are available from club pros. After your round drop into the Deltona Club Café for a meal.

New Smyrna Beach

Hidden Lakes Golf Club                                                                                                                                        35 Fairgreen Avenue                                                                                                                                            http://www.hiddenlakesgolfclub.com/

Playing at almost 5,900 yards at its longest, this par 69 is a favorite of the many snowbirds who arrive each winter in New Smyrna Beach. Despite the somewhat short distance the course features three, par five holes.

Book your tee time online, lessons are available for golfers of all ages and abilities, and when you are finished stop in to the 19th Hole Restaurant for a full assortment of foods that will leave you satisfied.

Play golf in Volusia County at the New Smyrna Golf Club.
Play golf in Volusia County at the New Smyrna Golf Club

New Smyrna Golf Club                                                                   1000 Wayne Avenue                                                                       http://newsmyrnagolfclub.com/

This public course was designed by Donald Ross and opened to the public in 1953. The course was renovated in 2016. This is a par 72 course with a distance of slightly over 6,500 yards. Reasonable rates and large numbers of snowbirds make early tee times difficult during the winter months. Be sure to grab lunch and a beer at Tiano’s. 

 

Book your tee time online (this course gets very busy in the winter) and be sure to stop in to the pro shop for all your equipment needs. Amenities include a driving range, putting green, practice bunker, chipping green, and professional lessons. Stop in at Tianos for delicious Italian themed food after your round.

Are you in New Smyrna Beach and looking for pizza? Tiano’s is a great option. Take a look at my NSB pizza recommendations and find the perfect dinner for your family! You won’t find any of the big chains on this list. Be sure to support your local restaurant owner.

 

The Preserve at Turnbull Bay                                                                                                                                 2600 Turnbull Estates Drive                                                                                                                                  https://www.thepreserveatturnbull.com/

This 6,600-yard, par 72 course, designed by Gary Wintz, runs through the Turnbull Bay nature preserve. Water is to be found throughout the course.

Book your tee time online for this beautiful course. Stop in to the Pro Shop for all your last minute needs: clothes, balls, bags, shoes, gloves, and any other golf supply you can think of. The club features a snack bar with a basic lineup of quick foods. Beer and wine are available.

Play golf in Volusia County at Venetian Bay Golf Course in New Smyrna Beach.
Venetian Bay, one of the premier places to play golf in Volusia County, FL.

Venetian Bay                                                                                  63 North Airport Road                                                                      https://venetianbaygolf.com/

Designed by CEC Design, Venetian Bay, considered by many the premiere course in New Smyrna Beach,  Venetian Bay measures almost 7,100 yards from the back tees and shoots a par 72. You start right out of the gate with an incredible 500+ yard par 5.

Book your tee time online then show up to the well stocked Pro Shop. Here you will find all the top names in golf equipment and apparel. They can even regrip your clubs for you. Private lessons are available at varying price points. Dining is available in the Champions Grille Restaurant. Members have access to the swim club and other amenities.

 

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Ormond Beach

Halifax Plantation Golf Club                                                                                                                                  3400 Clubhouse Drive                                                                                                                                        https://www.halifaxplantationgc.com/

This Bill Amick designed course plays at 7,100 yards at its longest with a par of 72. The course is noted for its picturesque views and rolling terrain. New grass in 2021 has increased the quality of play.

Reserve your tee time online. A PGA certified instructor is on staff to help you improve your game with private lessons. The Tavern Restaurant offers golfers and excellent meal option. The restaurant has varied hours by day.

Riviera Country Club                                                                                                                                           500 Calle Grande Street                                                                                                                                         https://www.rivcc.com/

Expanded to 18-holes in 1954, this course has been updated several times by golf architects including Mark Mahana, Dave Wallace, and Lloyd Clifton. The course measures 6,250 yards and is a par 71. This family owned course is part of the Florida Historic Golf Trail.

Call to reserve your tee time. Once there, get a bucket of range balls and warm up on the driving range. Most greens fees include cart rental. Stop in at the Pro Shop for all your golfing needs from top manufacturers. Breakfast and lunch year round, and it appears there is a dinner buffet during the winter months.

Port Orange

Crane Lakes Golf & Country Club                                                                                                                          1850 Crane Lakes Boulevard                                                                                                                    https://www.cranelakesgolf.com/

This is a semi-private 18-hole course designed to challenge any skill level. Rates depend upon season and time of day. Par 66 course that measures 5,186 yards from the furthest tees.

Reserve a tee time online then head over to the Golf Shop for any items you may need for your bag: clubs, balls, gloves, you name it. Practice facilities include a driving range, chipping green, and a putting green. Crane’s Roost Bar & Grill offer golfers a place to rest and unwind after playing 18.

Cypress Head Golf Club                                                                                                                                       6231 Palm Vista Street                                                                                                                                     https://www.cypressheadgolf.com/

Designed by architects Arthur Hills and Mike Dasher in 1992 this is a public course owned by the City of Port Orange. This course measures in at just under 6,800 yards from the longest tees with a par of 72.

Book your tee time online. Improve your game by signing up for one of the many clinics offered onsite. After shooting 18, finish your day at Flagsticks at Cypress Head.

Spruce Creek Country Club                                                                                                                            1900 Country Club Drive                                                                                                                                       https://www.sprucecreekclub.com/

This semi-private course was designed by Bill Amick. The back tees are slightly over 6,800 yards with a par of 72. You may encounter arriving or departing planes as the course is adjacent to the fly-in. Trees and water hazards highlight the course.

Reserve your tee time online. Call to reserve you table at the Prop n’ Fore Bar and Grille with salads, sandwiches, and full entrees. After playing and eating, you may want to look into a membership which is available at different levels and perks.

Thank you for reading my round up of golf courses in Volusia County. Now you should be able to find the best course to match your skills and be ready to play golf in Volusia County during your next vacation.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.

 

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Daytona Cubs Intern Ejected Over “Three Blind Mice”

Derek Dye

Every professional baseball player is going to have a run in with an umpire at some point. Umpires are human and are going to make bad calls. Calling balls and strikes at 95+ miles per hour is subjective no matter what the official baseball rule book might say. Bang-bang plays at a base can be just as difficult as an umpire may be partially shielded and at times, they just make a bad call. Modern replay and the challenge system are helping to lessen the impact of these calls but in years past, player or manager confrontations with umpires were more commonplace. In 2012, a sensitive umpire ejected a Daytona Cubs intern for playing the song Three Blind Mice.

Usually not a lot comes of it. The player may argue for a bit while walking away. When a call appears to be particularly egregious the manager may come bolting out of the dugout. Usually, he already knows he is going to get tossed but these actions are not meant to change calls but to support and fire up his team and their fans.

Some managers have been known for their tantrums. Bobby Cox holds the all-time record for most ejections with a whopping 162, equal to the number of games played in a complete season. Others well known for arguing calls and being ejected are Tony La Russa, Lou Pinella, and Bruce Bochy.

You can review career ejection numbers on this page.

Watch as Pirates manager Lloyd McClendon gets ejected in this classic clip.

For players, coaches, and umpires, life in the minor leagues can be a drag with long bus rides, low pay, and the reality that very few of them will ever make it to the majors. Umpires have an approximately three percent chance of making it to the “show.” It’s a dream though that dozens chase every year. In fact, Daytona Beach is home to one of the most famous umpiring schools; the Wendelstedt Umpire School.

Want to know more about what it is like to be a Major League umpire? Read Called Out but Safe: A Baseball Umpire’s Journey.

 

 

 

 

For fans, these minor league games can be quite entertaining. Teams run fun promotions, there’s a chance to see legitimate major leaguers on a rehab assignment, and prices are usually very reasonable, especially in comparison to major league prices.

Late Innings August 1, 2012

Fans at Jackie Robinson Ballpark were treated to some unexpected entertainment on August 1, 2012. That night during a close game between the home team Daytona Cubs and visiting Fort Myers Miracle in a Florida State League game, fans witnessed an ejection that could not have been predicted.

To learn more about historic Jackie Robinson Ballpark, click HERE.

With the game hanging in the balance during the top of the eighth inning, Miracle batter Andy Leer grounded a pitch to Cubs shortstop Tim Saunders, who threw low to first base. Field umpire Ramon Hernandez ruled that first baseman Taylor Davis bobbled the throw and called Leer safe.

 

Brian Harper was the Daytona Cubs manager when an intern was ejected for playing Three Blind Mice
Brian Harper of the Chicago Cubs poses during Photo Day on Monday, February 27, 2012 at Hohokam Stadium in Mesa, Arizona. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images)

Daytona Beach Cubs manager, and former major leaguer, Brian Harper came out to argue the call with Hernandez while home plate umpire Mario Seneca stood by taking stock of the situation.

Derek Dye Daytona Cubs Intern Ejected Over Three Blind Mice
Derek Dye is the Daytona Cubs intern ejected for playing Three Blind Mice
Photo courtesy Nigel Cook/Daytona Beach News Journal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Daytona Cubs Intern is Ejected

Seated in the press box was twenty-one-year-old intern Derek Dye, who attempted to poke some home-team humor at the umpires and over the public address system played the children’s song “Three Blind Mice.”

Seneca was in no mood for humor and turned to the press box, picked out the culprit, and yelled out, “You’re gone,” motioning the ejection. Seneca took his ire even further, silencing the sound system for the remainder of the game. That’s right. No announcing of batters, no music, no between innings sound system. Nothing but silence.

At first there was a bit of confusion. Those in the press box through that Harper had been ejected despite not vociferously arguing. They quickly realized it was University of Illinois senior, intern, Dye that had been given the boot.

The small crowd of less than 1,000 reacted as would be expected, showering the umpiring crew (all two of them) with boos. Cubs staff was quick to improvise however and a staffer in the grandstand took to shouting the names of each batter in turn. The tired crowd played along clapping and stomping their feet, showing support for their beloved Cubs.

When the final batter struck out in the top of the ninth inning, the Cubs were 2-1 winners over the Miracle and fans left Jackie Robinson Ballpark with a story that almost had to be seen to be believed. Want to see it? Watch below!

The Cubs and Miracle took to the field the next evening with the same umpiring crew. Intern Derek Dye was not in the press box however. Feeling lighter in the wallet thanks to a $25 fine from the Florida State League, Dye was handing out wristbands, helping identify fans as being 21 years or older in order to participate in the “Thirsty Thursday” promotion that evening.


Dye, and some fans in attendance, questioned the authority of Seneca to eject a non-participant in the game. Dye was quoted afterward, “I couldn’t believe it. I didn’t think the umpire had that sort of jurisdiction. I haven’t seen the flow chart of who has what power.”

While Dye may have questioned Seneca’s judgement, it appears that the umpire was well within his authority, and was not the first to do such. In an article in Bleacher Report they cited three rules Seneca invoked.

Paraphrased:

Rule 4.06(a)—participants should not incite or try to incite a demonstration by spectators

Rule 9.01 (b)—umpires have the duty to order a player, and others, to do or refrain from doing anything that impacts the administration of these rules and to enforce penalties

Rule 9.01(c)—umpires have authority to rule on any point not specifically covered in these rules

So, while Seneca may have seemed thin-skinned and quick on the trigger, Dye’s actions were considered worthy of ejection by the league who handed down the token fine. For Dye, he received an immediate, if short lived, burst of fame. It was reported that interview requests were submitted by ESPN and the “Good Morning America” show and the young intern signed several autographs for knowing fans.

Neither Mario Seneca or Ramon Hernandez was able to beat the odds. Neither umpired in the major leagues. Their having ejected Daytona Cubs intern Derek Dye for a game is the reason they are remembered in baseball today.

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Florida Surf Film Festival Coming in Novemeber

Florida Surf Film Festival
Florida Surf Film Festival
Florida Surf Film Festival

Make your plans now to attend the 2021 Florida Surf Film Festival being held on the campus of the Atlantic Center for the Arts in New Smyrna Beach.  Tickets for the two day event are available online now starting as low as $15.

Whether you are a  seasoned surfing veteran, a novice, or a film buff,   this is an event you won’t want to miss.

Film makers scheduled to attend include Jack Coleman and Isaac Halasima.

Jurors in attendance for the 2021 festival include Matt Warshaw, Encyclopedia of Surfing, Scott Hulet of The Surfer’s Journal, and Matthew Shaw, The Surfer’s Journal writer.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you click these links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. This commission does not affect any price that you pay. All views and opinions provided are my own and are never influenced by affiliate programs or sponsors providing products.